Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-22-11, 08:44 PM   #1
colpatrick
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Rochester, NY
Bikes: Specialized Crossroads
Posts: 76
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wife thinks we'll be fixing flats on our rides.

I'm telling her that whoever DOESN't get the flat drives back to the car and picks up the stranded rider.

Don't think it's realistic to carry a tire kit and pump for the type of riding we'll be doing.

I'm looking at 10-25 milers for the most part.

Who's being realistic?
colpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 08:56 PM   #2
Velo Dog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Northern Nevada
Bikes:
Posts: 3,802
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Why would you not fix the flat? It's about a five-minute job (I can do it in less than four with a frame-fit pump, but I've done it hundreds of times). Apparently you're casual riders, which is fine, but that probably means 10-12 mph. So you're 10 miles out, and somebody's going to ride for an hour to the car, load the bike and drive back while the other person does...what? Sits on the curb? Pushes the bike to Starbuck's? What happens if the rescue rider goes five miles and HE has a flat?
what's not "realistic" about carrying a pump and patch kit? Flats are a part of cycling. I've had six on my 25-mile commute to work and nine in a single century. One summer, here in the land of big thorns, I averaged a flat every 30 miles (I used to keep a very detailed riding log). Realistically, I don't go out of sight of my house without a pump, spare tube and patch kit.
Velo Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 08:57 PM   #3
bsektzer
Senior Member
 
bsektzer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Northern CA
Bikes: Pinarello Paris/Ui2, BMC TeamMachine SLR01/Campy Record EPS
Posts: 517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Your strategy will work just fine... until the "rescue" rider gets a flat on the way to the car.

What's not "realistic" about saving yourself 10 - 25 mile walk with a bit of kit that'll cost you maybe $20, fit in a sock, and weight less than a pound?

Speaking for myself, I wouldn't risk a lifetime's worth of "I told you so" from SWMBO when such a minor investment would prevent it
bsektzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:02 PM   #4
CraigB
Starting over
 
CraigB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Indianapolis
Bikes: 1990 Trek 1500; 2006 Gary Fisher Marlin; 2011 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105; 2012 Catrike Trail
Posts: 4,081
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Fixing flats is not that big a deal. Why not take care of it on the spot?
CraigB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:17 PM   #5
kevrider
Senior Member
 
kevrider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: northern nevada
Bikes: way too many
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
colonel, i think we're all with wifey on this one. a flat kit is like an umbrella -- it will not rain if you're smart enough to bring it. get the patch kit and feel smug about never having to use it. except you will use it eventually.
kevrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:18 PM   #6
cranky old dude
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 4,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by colpatrick View Post
...........
Who's being realistic?
Your Wife!!

Carry everything you need for emergency repairs, always.

If you're going to be riding our roads you can expect all kinds of mechanical difficulties. Crazy cars have been sliding into each other for the last three months leaving all sorts of debris out on the roadway to cut up your tires. The 'Pot Hole' crews have been out installing potholes all over the place hoping to break a few of your spokes.

The trails, oh my! They are littered with all kinds of wind blown goodies...everything from tree limbs to errant garbage which will do a real number on various parts of your drive trains when kicked up by your front wheel.

Be a good boy and listen to your bride.

P.S. When the weather improves, keep an eye out for a fat, grey bearded, crazy guy on a bike....and say Hi to me.
cranky old dude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:29 PM   #7
xizangstan
Senior Member
 
xizangstan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Colorado-California-Florida-(hopefully soon): Panama
Bikes: Vintage GT Xizang (titanium mountain bike)
Posts: 1,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I disagree. You're right. Us guys are always right. But to be safe, I would go ahead and buy a couple pumps and patch kits, as well as a set of plastic levers. That way, you just shut her up. And if you do have a flat, you won't have to walk. You can even let her fix the flat! Tell her to be careful and not break a fingernail...


I'm not being sexist, am I?
xizangstan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:30 PM   #8
XR2
Senior Member
 
XR2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Back in the hills again
Bikes: 88 Bridgestone T700
Posts: 1,004
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The wife is right. Regardless you can be right................or you can be happy. Seems like you choose the former a lot.
XR2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:31 PM   #9
CbadRider
Administrator
 
CbadRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: On the bridge with Picard
Bikes: Specialized Allez, Specialized Sirrus
Posts: 5,963
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Last summer I got 3 flats one afternoon riding the 17 miles home from work. Sometimes when it rains, it pours.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xerum 525 View Post
Now get on your cheap bike and give me a double century. You walking can of Crisco!!

Forum Guidelines *click here*
CbadRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:36 PM   #10
xizangstan
Senior Member
 
xizangstan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Colorado-California-Florida-(hopefully soon): Panama
Bikes: Vintage GT Xizang (titanium mountain bike)
Posts: 1,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm tired of thorns. I'm riding a mountain bike on Marathon Plus road tires with the Kevlar belt, plus I have the thorn-resistant Slime tubes, plus a pump and patch kit. Plus, I keep a spare tube in my rear rack bag. Yeah, that's a ton of extra weight. But like I said, I'm tired of thorns!
xizangstan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:38 PM   #11
Northwestrider
Senior Member
 
Northwestrider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Gig Harbor, WA
Bikes: Surly Long Haul Trucker, Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo, Dahon Mu P 24 , Bacchetta Strada, Rodriguez Tandem, Wheeler MTB
Posts: 2,453
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
The flat will need to be fixed at some point anyway. You'll have a more pleasant ride if you take the few minutes it takes to fix a flat, and just get it over with.
Northwestrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:39 PM   #12
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Bikes:
Posts: 6,273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Well, I guess we're all going to pile on. Get a pump that fits on your frame, levers, spare tube and a patch kit. You can splurge and get a little bag for under the saddle or under the top tube, carry the stuff in a jersey pocket, stuff it into a water bottle or get a larger bag that will carry your picnic and spare clothes and stuff it in there. While you're at it, get a nice multi-tool with a chain tool on it. I did a fifteen mile walk of shame while my wife and her sister finished the fifty mile loop we were on once because I didn't bring a chain tool. If you get lucky, you'll never need to use this stuff. I'm not that lucky.
B. Carfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:42 PM   #13
Doohickie 
You gonna eat that?
 
Doohickie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas Church of Hopeful Uncertainty
Bikes: 1966 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist, 1973 Schwinn Varsity, 1983 Raleigh Marathon, 1994 Nishiki Sport XRS
Posts: 14,360
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Perhaps your position is reasonable, but if you *do* get a flat at your furthest point out, you will hear about it FOREVER. Besides, how hard is it to carry an extra tube, a CO2 cartridge and inflator head, and tire levers?
__________________
I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.



Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
Doohickie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:43 PM   #14
Robert Foster
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Southern california
Bikes: Lapierre CF Sensium 400. Jamis Ventura Sport. Trek 800. Giant Cypress.
Posts: 3,498
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here is how it works on real life. If you ride 25 miles you will get your first flat on a hot day 12.5 miles from the car. If you leave your wife to go get the car when you get back to the car you will discover you locked your keys inside. When you do get back and retrieve your wife you will have given her several years of I told you so to live through. It is better to just bring something to fix the flat.
Robert Foster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:50 PM   #15
billydonn
Council of the Elders
 
billydonn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Omaha, NE
Bikes: 1990 Schwinn Crosscut, 5 Lemonds
Posts: 3,761
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by colpatrick View Post
I'm telling her that whoever DOESN't get the flat drives back to the car and picks up the stranded rider.

Don't think it's realistic to carry a tire kit and pump for the type of riding we'll be doing.

I'm looking at 10-25 milers for the most part.

Who's being realistic?
Your wife is right.
billydonn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:54 PM   #16
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20,916
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Flats are NOT a big deal, and you will be a hero in your wife's eyes if you can calmly and with knowledge fix it. Better practice a bit to be able to do that.
DnvrFox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 09:58 PM   #17
Monoborracho
Senior Member
 
Monoborracho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Deep In The Heart
Bikes: Seven Ti Tandem, Blue T12 tri bike, 92 Paramount, 93 Schwinn Mesa MTB, Soma Saga
Posts: 2,611
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
A few years ago on an out of state tour I had three flats in less than two miles. Fix them and go on.
Monoborracho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 10:02 PM   #18
doctor j
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Louisiana
Bikes:
Posts: 2,877
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
When you get the pump, get a Topeak Road Morph G. It has a foot peg and a hose, so it works like a floor pump and has a gauge. Carry a spare tube and a couple of tire levers. I've included a couple of GoJo towelettes in my kit. I got them at O'Reilly Auto Parts. Gets the grease off your hands easily. The first flat will naturally be a rear flat, and you'll get some grease on your hands.
doctor j is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 10:13 PM   #19
downtube42
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: San Angelo, TX
Bikes: Volae Team, '76 Motobecane Grand Jubile
Posts: 1,706
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You can be prepared for three flats and have four. You can be prepared for four and break a chain. You can carry chain repair and a crank arm will come loose. You can haul a portable bike shop and get hit by a truck. What do you consider "prepared enough"?

Carry flat repair because the odds of flatting are pretty high. But realize that, eventually, someone is going to have to walk home in the rain, alone.
downtube42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 11:03 PM   #20
outwest5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Southern California
Bikes:
Posts: 201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Flats are easy to repair, but I hadn't the slightest idea how to do it until I went to a bike clinic at the lbs. If you aren't sure how to do it quickly, go to your lbs and have them show you the little tricks. Once I learned how, I just carry those two plastic thingies to get the tire off the rim (free from lbs), an extra tube (under $5), a couple of sticky patches (in case I get more than one flat) and CO2 cartriage with a tiny nozzle- no pump. CO2 is quick and easy. Why stop a nice ride for a little flat?
outwest5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 11:26 PM   #21
Louis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 4,866
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by outwest5 View Post
Flats are easy to repair, but I hadn't the slightest idea how to do it until I went to a bike clinic at the lbs. If you aren't sure how to do it quickly, go to your lbs and have them show you the little tricks. Once I learned how, I just carry those two plastic thingies to get the tire off the rim (free from lbs), an extra tube (under $5), a couple of sticky patches (in case I get more than one flat) and CO2 cartriage with a tiny nozzle- no pump. CO2 is quick and easy. Why stop a nice ride for a little flat?
Exactly. I look at a flat as kind of like breaking a bootlace on a hike. A minor nuisance, but a chance to rest for bit, take in the scenery, have a snack, etc.
Louis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-11, 11:58 PM   #22
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Bikes:
Posts: 3,894
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Heck, my wife knows how to change tubes and fix a flat

However, I do have to ask, " why does she always get to take the picture"?


PS. Stick a pair of rubber gloves in your kit. Keeps hands clean.

Last edited by Doug64; 02-23-11 at 12:03 AM.
Doug64 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-11, 12:07 AM   #23
t4mv
ES&D
 
t4mv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Roadieville, USA
Bikes: 3Rensho, Merlin XL, Melton custom, Michael Johnson tandem, Look 481SL, Pedal Force RS
Posts: 1,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you have N+1 flats where N=the # of cartridges you have, you might want to have a pump with you. Just sayin'
t4mv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-11, 12:19 AM   #24
twobadfish
Riding
 
twobadfish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Bend, Oregon
Bikes: Motobecane Fantom Cross Pro; Motobecane Nemesis Pro
Posts: 1,603
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by colpatrick View Post
Who's being realistic?
There is ironic comedy in the answer to your question.
twobadfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-11, 12:39 AM   #25
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Bikes:
Posts: 6,273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
Heck, my wife knows how to change tubes and fix a flat

However, I do have to ask, " why does she always get to take the picture"?


PS. Stick a pair of rubber gloves in your kit. Keeps hands clean.
+1 on the gloves. Rims are messy, at least if you live anywhere with hills, stop signs, rain, or dirt. I hate riding home with dirty hands and flats only happen when you are about to run out of water.
B. Carfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:24 PM.