Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Why?

  1. #1
    I need speed AzTallRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    My Bikes
    Giant Propel, Cervelo P2
    Posts
    5,514
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Why?

    On her blog, my coach posed the simple question "Why?", as in, "Why do endurance competitors do it?". Here is the link.

    http://gorillamultisport.wordpress.com/2011/03/28/why/

    I'm posting the link here because we so often discuss the various forms that our cycling takes, from casual 'smell the roses' rides, to loooonnnggg endurance rides, to 'push till your eyes bleed' races. I think we try to understand each other, and that her blog entry, and the response I wrote to her below, might further that understanding.

    *********************

    There comes a point, in any challenging ride, when you see the space in front of your wheel increasing. You are pushing hard, but that space is getting bigger and bigger. You realize it is one of those moments, when you either dig deep down into your reserves to close the gap, or you will find yourself 'Off The Back'.

    Off The Back - OTB - Dropped - Detached - Off The Pace - Behind - DFL

    However you label it, watching as the pack rides away from you is a disheartening experience. As they pull away, you find yourself slowing even more, not only from the fatigue of trying to hold the too-fast pace, but from the mental letdown which occurs as you are unable to do so. Going OTB can effectively end a race, or destroy a workout session.

    But it doesn't have to.

    When Coach asked the question "Why?", I thought hard about whether I had honestly answered the question, and whether I had hit the training wall hard and long enough to truly face it. Plus, there are so many reasons not to do what we endurance athletes do, that our thoughts surrounding the question of "why" can become cluttered, and our motivation compromised. We can get so caught up in the process of what we are putting in to our sport, that we lose track of what we are trying to get out of it. I think that is part of what Coach was trying to do in posing the question: clear the clutter; boil it down to the basics of what we are doing and why we are doing it; clean up the thought process. Focus!

    In doing so, my answer to coach's question becomes clear.

    Off The Back.

    In life, just as in my much shorter venture into cycling, there have been many times when I have gone "Off The Back". I haven't performed the way I wanted to at work; I've hurt a friend or lover; I've let down my family. These things happen. If you've lived a life where you haven't experienced "Off The Back" life events, then you are either very young, very sheltered, or have just never 'put yourself out there'. Our mistakes... our failures... is how we learn the most. And in life, the real key is in being able to put those failures behind you, learn from them, forgive yourself if need be, and move on. Remember them, yes, and use them to perform better, but don't dwell on them. Remember them, and you will grow; dwell on them, and you are destined to repeat them - to let them defeat you.

    I choose not to be defeated by going Off The Back.

    That's my answer. I choose not to be defeated by life experiences, nor by the physical and mental demands of cycling. I will be one of those individuals who are able to push through the physical strain, and who accept the mental and emotional struggles of a sport that constantly reminds us of how far we still have to go.

    I'm going to be dropped, again and again. I may not finish with the pack on any given day, but I will finish. I will finish strong, and I will leave every bit of myself out on the course. I will learn from being dropped, but I will not dwell on it. I will get better and better; stronger and stronger. I will grow. And on some days, there will be riders behind me, watching my wheel get further and further away, and they will be asking themselves the question:

    "Why?"
    "If you're riding less than 18 MPH up a 2% grade please tell people Coggan is coaching you."

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    44.0942-73.366791
    Posts
    412
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Because you 'win' when ever you give it your personal 100% effort [quote of a second place finisher]
    http://img1.jurko.net/avatar_14902.gif


    *Common sense clearly isn't common*

  3. #3
    Senior Member bobbycorno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,545
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AzTallRider View Post
    On her blog, my coach posed the simple question "Why?", as in, "Why do endurance competitors do it?".
    Not a competitor in any sense any more, but I rando because I like to ride and I don't like to stop. I ride harder than a lot of folks do, and less so than others, but yeah, I "leave it all out there".

    SP
    Bend, OR

  4. #4
    just keep riding BluesDawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Milledgeville, Georgia
    My Bikes
    2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2014 Specialized Crux EVO Carbon Disc, 2012 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross, 2011 Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert Compact, 2009 Salsa Casseroll, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB
    Posts
    12,793
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    HTFU, loser!

    Not serious. Actually a very well stated and healthy approach.
    The more you ride your bike, the less your ass will hurt.

  5. #5
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    A Different Perspective

    Unlike you (I guess), I have a limited amount of energy and realted strengths, and must choose where I put that limited resource.

    As the father of two children with profound disabilities, I have chosen to place my total energies in that direction and related family issues. And, believe me, it has (and is - even this week) taken that energy, drive and effort in full to achieve for them what is needed for their best growth, living and even survival. And, I have done this even when putting my job and career in jeopardy, and even changing my careers when there was a conflict.

    So, again, unlike you, I find that activites such as bicycling, swimming, weight lifting, walking are activites that relax me and reenergize me so that I can do my primary "job" to the best of my ability and with all my energies. Therefore, I have no fear of not finishing or falling off the back in bicycling - it siimply is not in my consciousness nor do I want it to be.

    I compete - yes I do - only in an entirely different (and to me significanlty more important) arena.

    Fortunately, it takes all types to make up this world.

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

  6. #6
    I need speed AzTallRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    My Bikes
    Giant Propel, Cervelo P2
    Posts
    5,514
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I applaud your commitment to your children Dnvr, and I don't see our perspectives as that divergent. For me, pushing through the limits on the bike helps enable me to meet the challenges of life. The riding I do energizes me, just as yours does you. I am of course limited in the time I can spend riding, but my biggest limiting factor is that I am 56 years old, and in only my first year of training and racing. There aren't enough years left to really catch up with those that started much younger.
    "If you're riding less than 18 MPH up a 2% grade please tell people Coggan is coaching you."

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    Specialized SL2 Roubaix Comp
    Posts
    707
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Why ? My wife and I are like DnvrFox.

    As a parent of a son who has Aspergers syndrome and as someone himself who has ADHD it's a constant challenge every day, seven days a week, 52 weeks a year. My wife and I feel lucky in that our son's disability is more of a borderline case than a profound one but it's never been easy. We've both had to make a lot of compromises in our careers and we feel blessed. He's now in his freshman year in college and with some fairly minimal support and a lot of coaching by my wife ( a teacher ) and his older brother we feel pretty confident that he'll be well on his way. There were times when we feared that both his younger and older brother had ADHD as well but fortunately that hasn't been the case.

    The divorce rate among couples with a child with disabilities in the autism spectrum like Aspergers is considerably higher than the norm. It's not the reported 80% but it is probably closer to double the average rate. The only way to survive is to make compromises and decisions that ar at times unthinkable for some people. My wife and I have been married for 32 years and we've been together for over 35 and we feel like we've dodged the bullet sometimes. We both really feel for parents of children with special needs and we do know several couples that two or more children with profound disabilities. In a couple of cases, it's a miracle that they're still all together but together they are and a lot stronger for it.

    My own issues with ADHD started interfering with my life while I was an undergrad and eventually got so severe that I dropped out of graduate school. It took over 5 years but once I finally discovered what the problem was and we found the right treatment I could at least get on with life. That's not to say that there hasn't been a few bumps but who doesn't run into those ? I've feel that I've been very fortunate in that I've been working in cutting edge tech for over 35 years and it's been a profession that's been not just satisfying but fun as well. Between family pressures and my own issues with what is called a disability (it can actually be an asset in my line of work) my wife and I have had to make a lot of compromises with respect to things like career opportunities and promotions but I can't complain nor do I feel that I have a right to complain since most people consider us to be extremely affluent.

    Do I feel like I'm being left behind ? Sometimes, but by the end of the day, I'd have to say no. I know that I've often had employers to consider me as underachieving but they've never had to live with the sorts of challenges I've had and the compromises I've had to make. It's something that I've always had to make abundantly clear to them and I feel lucky in that I've only had to change jobs once because of an employer who refused to accept the word "no". The software engineering profession is full of people with ADHD, Aspergers syndrome and I've actually had managers who are in the same sorts of circumstances as I am.

    Living with a child with disabilities also takes it's toll on the other siblings in the family as well which is why we went to the added and considerable expense of having our eldest son go to college away from home for which he has been extremely grateful to help him keep his sanity.

    On the other hand, the experiences that our he has had with his brother has also equipped our eldest son with some impressive mediation skills that I never would have thought he would develop. He's now in his senior year in college and will be on his way to law school after taking a year off. It was a path in life I never would have predicted for him 5 years ago.

    Our youngest son (15) has also learned a great deal in recognizing and learning how to deal with children with ADHD and autism spectrum disabilities and since he's a very proficient skier he's been instrumental in instructing a friend of his who has severe ADHD. He's also been often asked to help instruct younger children at the ski school he goes to. He'll be taking counselor training at the summer camp he goes to this summer and he'll be geting his level 1 certification in ski instruction next winter.

    Has it been a marathon run ? You bet it's been one. There are days when my wife will say at the end of a day that she feels like she's been through the wringer and done a marathon at the same time although it's been getting easier as time goes on. My wife not only teaches English and ESL (english as a second language - for new immigrants) but she also teaches Special Education. It really takes a parent of a special needs child to teach them because having a child of your own that has special needs makes you more understanding and more compassionate. Some the stories and circumstances that I hear about on almost a daily basis is heartbreaking at times and I can see why she often goes that extra mile for her students.

    DnvrFox,

    I applaud you for what you are doing. If I had to do things over again I'd do what you are doing and have stayed in better shape over the last 30 years instead of doing it now. We've been like most couples, spending our energies in raising a family so staying fit and sometimes our health takes a back seat to everything else.

    AzTallRider,

    I'd been away from being a roadie for over 35 years. My late brother always used to say when we were kids "there's no such word as can't". While both he, my older sister and my parents were the real atheletes in the family, I was the only cyclist and although I've never raced, the word "can't" has never appeared in the equation. I did it, and still do it one mile at a time, one hill at a time. I've become more systematic and more organized because I want to get rid of the last of the excess weight that's been the bane of my existence over the last 6 years. I also want to get back to doing the centuries that were so much easier when I was a teenager.

    My one bit of advice for somebody who isn't used to training. Don't overtrain. The endorphins you produce while training can give you that wonderful high and you feel cranky if you don't get out there but they can get in your way and actually set you back because you're actually hurting yourself when you aren't taking those all important rest days. Your brain needs the downtime too.

    I've had neighbours who are younger than me stand there and ask me "how do you do it ? How can you ride like that ?"

    I have to curb my tongue and not say "well you push this foot this way, and the other foot that way...".




    Keep it up guys.
    At any age: Always carry a spare.
    After age 50: Always carry a spare and try to get rid of the one around the middle.
    Km for last year: 2,844.02 km
    Km this year: 172 km

    2011 Specialized SL2 Roubaix Comp
    2007 Trek 7100

  8. #8
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If I had to do things over again I'd do what you are doing and have stayed in better shape over the last 30 years instead of doing it now.
    I didn't start bicycling until I was 58. While I did activities during my life, the time when my first son became totally paralyzed from the shoulders down (1986) began a period where my absolutely total energy was going in only one direction - starting and providing a program for my youngest son with profound developmental disabilities as he entered a vast world of nothingess and long wait lists as he left school at age 21, and, simultaneously, figuring out how to give my oldest son the best chance in life as someone totally paralyzed. During this time my physical training and health deteriorated, until I founf myself 40 pounds over weight and huffing as I climbed a set of stairs. I practically lived in the rehab hospital for 3 months with my oldest son, then lived in the same rehab hospital 3 months with my youngest son when he also became paralyzed. And that is just the start. Fund raising $60,000 for a van and to add an addition to our home with a roll-in shower. Fighting agencies like vocational rehabilitation for services for both of our sons - including almost going to court, etc., etc., etc.

    Now, my oldest son, still paralyzed from the shoulders down, is a Stanford Law School graduate and married to a Yale Law School graduate, who are very successful and highly respected nationally in their chosen legal specialty, disability access. Instead of being dependent on society, he is a (very large) taxpayer. My youngest son is in a wonderful "Host Home" - but we STILL (at age 71 and 73) have to fight for every dollar and service, which are continuously being reduced in our current economic environment. Even this week, we are fighting for sufficient $$ to keep a day program going for him. And what I have written above is just the start.

    So, my health and weight and fitness suffered, and it was only as things settled down a bit that I have been able to devote some time to my own health. However, I still devote about 40 hours per week in volunteer time for local and national advocacy efforts, especially in ending the 20 year wait lists for services for individuals with disabilities all across the country.

    Enough of the soapbox. Sometimes it seems to me that the glory and plaudits go to the winners in athletic contests, while the winners in the fight for life in difficult situations are never recognized.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    Specialized SL2 Roubaix Comp
    Posts
    707
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sometimes it seems to me that the glory and plaudits go to the winners in athletic contests, while the winners in the fight for life in difficult situations are never recognized.
    I agree that it's frustrating at times. I live in Toronto where hockey is more of a religion than a game. Where the fans are still willing to shell out $600 for a pair of tickets to watch a mediocre team lose once more at the Air Canada Center. It seems that every other kid from the age of 10 up wants to play in the NHL. None of my boys has ever exhibited any interest in playing the game and even though I'd been on skates from the time I was 4 I'm glad that they don't play the game.

    There are parents who have an unhealthy attitude towards the game and in many leagues are banned from attending the games because coaches and officials have been abused and assulted by parents who are literally foaming at the mouth.

    On the other hand, my heart goes out to Scott Finlay's parents who I'd met many years ago and who sold me my second pair of cross country skis when I was in graduate school. I remember Scott working at one of his fathers sporting goods stores and I was horrified to hear about his accident not too long after I'd bought my skis.

    http://www.thestar.com/sports/articl...or-injured-son

    It's time consuming and all encompassing sometimes to be an advocate for your child when they have a disability . Fortunately, here in Canada it's not for a lack of services since our universal health care system is taxpayer funded and is available to everyone for free and health care services are regulated at the provincial level but how those services are delivered at the local level. The access to those services is variable depending on where you live and sometimes people have to move in order to access those services.

    The system of tax credits and provincially funded disability pensions and support payments on the other hand is maze of accounting arcana that has unfortunately spawned a cottage industry that preys upon the people who need the most help but can't or are unable to understand the sometimes insane rules and regulations. My wife has a colleague who has two severely disabled children and is considering starting a non-profit advocacy organization.

    To end this on a more positive note, another person who comes to mind is Brian McKeever, an almost totally blind cross-country skier who was attempting to make history by being the first disabled skier to be on both the Paralympic team and the Canadian Olympic team last year. Brian is a multiple medalist at the Paralympics and his talent and determination continues to amaze me. He got bumped off the national team at the last minute just before the 2010 Olympics and he captured the hearts and imagination of the entire country.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sport...rticle1957709/
    At any age: Always carry a spare.
    After age 50: Always carry a spare and try to get rid of the one around the middle.
    Km for last year: 2,844.02 km
    Km this year: 172 km

    2011 Specialized SL2 Roubaix Comp
    2007 Trek 7100

  10. #10
    I need speed AzTallRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    My Bikes
    Giant Propel, Cervelo P2
    Posts
    5,514
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm sure it's frustrating for both of you, having the extra demands take up such a huge portion of your available time. I do have a glimmer of what it's like, as I have a nephew who is somewhere in that amorphous "autism space". My brother and his wife fought the battles with the school systems for the special care he needed - sometime winning; sometimes losing. They strove to give his 2 brothers lives as 'normal' as possible, but of course those brothers shared the burden. I watched as their marriage ultimately broke apart. My brother has custody of one child - the one with the special needs - who is now in his twenties and nowhere close to being able to care for himself. I've watched my brother try to have relationships, but most people don't want to signup for a life dominated by caring for someone like my nephew. He can be, let's just say "extremely frustrating" to be around for any lengthy period. I admire my brother, and never felt I would have come close to handling things as well as he has. It has been his ultra marathon; one he is still running. And as you say, one without accolades. He has fallen Off The Back many times, but has not let it defeat him.

    I admire all of you that accept the extra challenges you face, and understand it better due to my cycling.
    "If you're riding less than 18 MPH up a 2% grade please tell people Coggan is coaching you."

  11. #11
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Windy City
    My Bikes
    A road bike for every purpose
    Posts
    9,449
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Great opening post and follow-up comments. The last five years I've been improving my life and reconciling my personal narrative. "Why" is something I consider often.

    I have a simple philosophy that might answer the question “Why”? A person is making progress or is declining, there is no possibility of staying the same or finding equilibrium.

    The world keeps turning with, or without, us. We either seek out positive changes or we are reduced to our minimum standards.

    I graduated from Northwestern University at the age of 49 after many years of night school. I did it to become a more substantial person and to provide a good example for my children. That was all the motivation I needed.

    Five years ago I was 70 lbs over-weight. I was in good health, but I knew that doing nothing meant the risk of health issues. I started cycling to improve my health. That was all the motivation I needed.

    My goal is not to hang with a fast group of strong cyclist. I like to train with faster riders, but I know I’ll be dropped and don’t let it discourage me.

    I do set goals for monthly and annual mileage ridden. I also push myself to enable me to ride hilly endurance and challenge rides. I hope that my health and my personal situation allow me to continue to enjoy these activities.
    Last edited by Barrettscv; 04-01-11 at 10:22 AM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member bruce19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
    My Bikes
    MASI Gran Criterium S & Guru steel
    Posts
    3,262
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AzTallRider View Post
    ..........I choose not to be defeated by life experiences.......................
    For some reason this all reminded me of the day I went up to the Univ. of VT to get my son. He had just finished his Junior year and finals were over. As I got out of my truck I saw his gf leaning over the balcony on the second floor waving to me.

    I asked, "How did Finals go?"
    She replied, "Nothing I studied for was on the tests and I guessed at all the answers."
    I responded, "Sounds like my life."

    From a couple of cars away a loud laugh. I turned and saw another Dad standing next to his car with a big grin. In that moment we were kindred souls.

  13. #13
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bruce19 View Post
    For some reason this all reminded me of the day I went up to the Univ. of VT to get my son. He had just finished his Junior year and finals were over. As I got out of my truck I saw his gf leaning over the balcony on the second floor waving to me.

    I asked, "How did Finals go?"
    She replied, "Nothing I studied for was on the tests and I guessed at all the answers."
    I responded, "Sounds like my life."

    From a couple of cars away a loud laugh. I turned and saw another Dad standing next to his car with a big grin. In that moment we were kindred souls.

    Made my morning!

  14. #14
    Must... ride... more... Phil_gretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sterling, VA
    My Bikes
    '77 Fuji S-10S, '82 Fuji Team, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '08 Scattante CFR, '12 Jamis Sputnik, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT
    Posts
    2,395
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Inspirational

    Things I never knew about the fellow posters on this forum. You are, each in your own way, inspirational to the rest of us. Thanks for writing. PG

  15. #15
    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    My Bikes
    Simoncini, Gary Fisher, Specialized Tarmac
    Posts
    4,052
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Why? For me the answer is simple. At 55 I could ease up and just relax, I have worked hard up to this point and my life is in order. But since I enjoy being active and I have a 10 YO which enjoys all the same things I do I am focused on keeping my fitness up to a level that I can continue to enjoy my time with her. I know that within 5 years it will be a significant challenge, I am training for that time.
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

  16. #16
    Senior Member bruce19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
    My Bikes
    MASI Gran Criterium S & Guru steel
    Posts
    3,262
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Although I joined this thread a bit late it has made me see my life in a different context. My entire life has been spent in two pursuits. I've been an athlete from Little League through college football and baseball. And, vocationally I have spent my life trying to make things better for people who are at a disadvantage. Specifically, writing CT's first Affirmative Action Plan for state employees and investigating allegations of abuse of people with developmental disabilities. Reaching for something better makes me better, whether it's my once a week 15 mi. TT on the bicycle or trying to improve life for someone who needs help.

  17. #17
    Banned. DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    20,924
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bruce19 View Post
    Although I joined this thread a bit late it has made me see my life in a different context.
    I guess I am not clear as to what that "different context" is?

    Incidentally, do you know Jordan Scheff of MARCH, Inc in CT?

  18. #18
    Senior Member bruce19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
    My Bikes
    MASI Gran Criterium S & Guru steel
    Posts
    3,262
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
    I guess I am not clear as to what that "different context" is?

    Incidentally, do you know Jordan Scheff of MARCH, Inc in CT?
    I don't know Jordan. I do know MARCH but only tangentially. What I meant by "different context" is simply that I didn't realize that what I have done breaks down into two categories as much as it does. Putting the sports thing aside for the moment....my first job with the State of CT was in helping the unemployed and Viet Nam era vets get work....then Affirmative Action...then Personnel/Labor Relations at the Mansfield Training School where I helped open an office dedicated to investigations of abuse. From there it was the Office of Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities then back to DMR where I ran all the investigations for the Commissioner in the eastern region. Worked out of Norwich. That's kind of it except for getting a teaching cert. in Industrial Technology and a brief stint in woodworking in Stafford, CT.

  19. #19
    Century bound Phil85207's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mesa Arizona
    My Bikes
    Felt AR4 and Cannondale hybrid
    Posts
    2,249
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For me, it just gives me something to shoot for, and tends to help me stay healthy.
    Chief Executive In Charge Of Diddly Squat.

    Taking on a long hill is like fighting a Gorilla. You don't stop when you are tired, You stop when the Gorilla is tired.

    Now ridding a
    Felt AR4 with Mavic Super light Premium wheels
    Cannonade Hybrid

    If you lack the courage to start, you have already finished.

    In God we trust

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •