Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-10-11, 08:37 PM   #1
Banded Krait
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Malvern, Pa.
Bikes: Trek Pilot 5.9
Posts: 438
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My new ride

I am so excited, you'd think I was a 7-year old boy getting his first bike instead of the 54-year old "geezer" I actually am.

After an 8-month long research-and-shopping odyssey which began last August, I finally bought a bicycle today. I bought a 2010 Gary Fisher Cronus.

I am so tired--I spent four hours both yesterday and today test-riding bicycles--that I am going to keep this post short and hit the sack. I just wanted to thank all of you who make this forum such a great resource for people like me who are getting back into biking after very long--in my case, over 30 years--layoffs.

I will add more details about my research and shopping experiences later. All I can say is, it was very enlightening on many different levels.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Gary Fisher Cronus.jpg (54.7 KB, 143 views)
Banded Krait is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 08:42 PM   #2
Dan Burkhart 
Senior member
 
Dan Burkhart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Oakville Ontario
Bikes:
Posts: 5,984
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banded Krait View Post
I am so excited, you'd think I was a 7-year old boy getting his first bike instead of the 54-year old "geezer" I actually am.

After an 8-month long research-and-shopping odyssey which began last August, I finally bought a bicycle today. I bought a 2010 Gary Fisher Cronus.

I am so tired--I spent four hours both yesterday and today test-riding bicycles--that I am going to keep this post short and hit the sack. I just wanted to thank all of you who make this forum such a great resource for people like me who are getting back into biking after very long--in my case, over 30 years--layoffs.

I will add more details about my research and shopping experiences later. All I can say is, it was very enlightening on many different levels.
Congratulations. Very sharp bike. We'll be waiting for your ride report.
Dan Burkhart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 08:45 PM   #3
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20,916
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
"YES!"

Gorgeous

And - 54 is NOT a geezer. Wish I was 54 again - and - even at 71.5, I am NOT a geezer.
DnvrFox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 09:01 PM   #4
doctor j
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Louisiana
Bikes:
Posts: 2,893
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Congratulations on the new ride. It looks nice.

Come back to us with a ride report.
doctor j is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-11, 09:32 PM   #5
miss kenton
Senior Member
 
miss kenton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Blueberry Capital of the WORLD, NJ
Bikes: Trek '09 1.5 wsd, Trek '13 Cocoa
Posts: 2,095
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

Hey! I'm 54. I... am...not a geezer! I am not...a geezer! I am a human being!

Oh. By the way, nice bike!
miss kenton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 04:07 AM   #6
BluesDawg
just keep riding
 
BluesDawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Milledgeville, Georgia
Bikes: 2015 Specialized AWOL Comp frameset (custom build), 2015 Zukas custom road, 2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB, 1980ish Fuji S-12S
Posts: 13,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Welcome aboard, fellow geezer. Nice bike. Looking forward to reading about the selection process.
BluesDawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 08:07 AM   #7
CraigB
Starting over
 
CraigB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Indianapolis
Bikes: 1990 Trek 1500; 2006 Gary Fisher Marlin; 2011 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105; 2012 Catrike Trail
Posts: 4,081
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd love to hear your riding reactions on the bike. It looks like it has a pretty healthy (read: tall) head tube, which appeals to me, but I've also read someplace, maybe the Fisher website, that his road bike designs feature longer than average top tubes, which I think might cause me some of the neck/back issues the taller head tube would have otherwise helped.
CraigB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 08:11 AM   #8
BluesDawg
just keep riding
 
BluesDawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Milledgeville, Georgia
Bikes: 2015 Specialized AWOL Comp frameset (custom build), 2015 Zukas custom road, 2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB, 1980ish Fuji S-12S
Posts: 13,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigB View Post
I'd love to hear your riding reactions on the bike. It looks like it has a pretty healthy (read: tall) head tube, which appeals to me, but I've also read someplace, maybe the Fisher website, that his road bike designs feature longer than average top tubes, which I think might cause me some of the neck/back issues the taller head tube would have otherwise helped.
Looking at the geometry chart on the GF website shows the size 58 Cronus has a shorter top tube than my size 58 Roubaix. FWIW
http://fisherbikes.com/bike/model/cronus
http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...01&scname=Road

Last edited by BluesDawg; 04-11-11 at 08:16 AM.
BluesDawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 08:12 AM   #9
CraigB
Starting over
 
CraigB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Indianapolis
Bikes: 1990 Trek 1500; 2006 Gary Fisher Marlin; 2011 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105; 2012 Catrike Trail
Posts: 4,081
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Good to know. Thanks, BD.
CraigB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 09:20 AM   #10
bjjoondo 
Old, SLOW bike rider! ;)
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Colorado Springs, CO.
Bikes: 1993 Mongoose Switchback MTB
Posts: 1,856
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
SWEET machine, ENJOY, LOL, too many take our age to seriously, I mean a kid I don't know called me Grandpa, what the heck, he called it right!
__________________
Take care, RIDE SAFE, have FUN!
B.J. Ondo
1993 Mongoose Switchback Ridged MTB, converted to a "Rail Trail Bike"! :)
bjjoondo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 10:06 AM   #11
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Bikes: '73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, '72 Peugeot UO-8, '82 Peugeot TH8, '87 Bianchi Brava, '76? Masi Grand Criterium, '87 Centurion Ironman Expert, '74 Motobecane Champion Team, '86 Gazelle champion mondial, '81? Grandis, and lots of uncertainty on some
Posts: 10,516
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banded Krait View Post
...the 54-year old "geezer" I actually am.
I remember 54. Not clearly though. It was some time ago.

Jump on the bike and go!
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 11:48 AM   #12
KDGast
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri
Bikes: Merlin, Trek, Specialized, Trek
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am a 59 year old "geezer" and have a 2010 Chronus Pro and love it!!! Fast and comfortable. I think you will enjoy it.
KDGast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 11:59 AM   #13
az_cyclist
Senior Member
 
az_cyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Arizona
Bikes: Trek Domane 4.5, Trek 1500
Posts: 1,899
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Enjoy, Banded Krait, and welcome to the 50+ cycling club!

Just curious..... why did you chose this nickname?
az_cyclist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 07:31 PM   #14
Ranger63
Senior Member
 
Ranger63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: western new york
Bikes: mid 80s Ross Centaur converted to Alfine 11 09 motobecane imortal force, 83 Ross Paragon,81 Schwinn LeTour Tourist, 91 Paramount, 93 GT converted to city bike
Posts: 719
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
The jersey said D>O>B>..is Geezer short for that? At our age wheezer may be a better term.
Ya got the bike, now get togeather with some guys and gals who like to ride wnd who'll push the envelope a bit.
By next year at this time you'll be regaling us with tales of hill climbs and centuries.
Ranger63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-11, 08:35 PM   #15
billydonn
Council of the Elders
 
billydonn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Omaha, NE
Bikes: 1990 Schwinn Crosscut, 5 Lemonds
Posts: 3,761
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
"YES!"

Gorgeous

And - 54 is NOT a geezer. Wish I was 54 again - and - even at 71.5, I am NOT a geezer.
+1 on the "no-geezer" lingo!
Also +1 on the bike... very nice!
Would like to see a pic of the actual bike though... and look forward to further comments on the shopping experience. I sure wish I had started back riding at 54 instead of waiting until 60.
billydonn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 02:02 PM   #16
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
Posts: 19,915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Difference in interpretation of the term "Geezer" over here. A geezer is a male that has a bit of flashness about him and always to the fore of anything taking place. You can be an "Old" geezer but the term geezer can be interpreted for any age of male that has some presence about him. It is normally a "Southern" term aswell and associated with Londoners more than anyone else.

So the bike is 2 days old and no ride report yet and no pics of it alongside the Pie and coffee.---That is worrying.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 03:52 PM   #17
nmichell
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Fort Collins, CO
Bikes: '05 Salsa La Raza, '13 Aluboo (bamboo) SS, '12 DaVinci Grand Junction tandem
Posts: 359
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Nice ride. Maybe too nice for an "old geezer". Luckily, riding this bike often will make you younger
nmichell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 05:01 PM   #18
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20,916
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Looks like the OP has flown away!!

I guess we can stop commenting unless we just like to write (and read) our own stuff.
DnvrFox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 05:30 PM   #19
BluesDawg
just keep riding
 
BluesDawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Milledgeville, Georgia
Bikes: 2015 Specialized AWOL Comp frameset (custom build), 2015 Zukas custom road, 2014 Specialized Crave Pro 29, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB, 1980ish Fuji S-12S
Posts: 13,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
I guess we'll have to settle for being "old farts" to avoid the cross-cultural confusion of the term "geezer".
BluesDawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 05:37 PM   #20
kr32
Senior Member
 
kr32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Waldorf Md.
Bikes: Cannondale Six Carbon 5 and Gary Fisher Wahoo
Posts: 2,045
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When does one stop being a "new fart" and become an Old one?
kr32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 07:09 PM   #21
Phil85207
Century bound
 
Phil85207's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mesa Arizona
Bikes: Felt AR4 and Cannondale hybrid
Posts: 2,253
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
OP. Wake up and give us some specks.
Phil85207 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 08:26 PM   #22
Banded Krait
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Malvern, Pa.
Bikes: Trek Pilot 5.9
Posts: 438
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Looks like the OP has flown away!!

I guess we can stop commenting unless we just like to write (and read) our own stuff.
No, that’s not the case. I actually tried to post some more yesterday evening. That was when I discovered a rather annoying bug—err, feature—of the software behind this forum. Apparently there is an unadvertised inactivity time limit. I had typed a longer than average reply, and when I attempted to post it, I got a message that I would have to log-in, even though I had been logged-in when I began typing my post. So, I logged-in again, only to discover that my reply had vanished in the ether. Man, that was annoying. Any suggestions as to how to avoid this in the future?

Anyway, thanks for all the nice comments. I thought I would recount a little of my selection/shopping experience, for as I said in my original post, the whole process was very enlightening for me.

What surprised me the most was the huge variation in professionalism and service I experienced in the five different local bicycle stores (LBS) I visited during this process. This ranged from what can be described as almost total indifference in not just one, but actually two different stores of the same local chain of LBS, to what I will characterize as the historical seat-of-the-pants level of service in two other stores, to a notably higher level of service, advice, and professionalism at the fifth store. Guess which one I bought the bike at? Given the fact that the country is in the midst of the worst financial downturn since the Great Depression, I would have thought that small businesses like bicycle stores would be clawing for customers, but that’s certainly not what I found.

This was most obvious in the area of determining the correct size of bike for me. As I said in my original post, it has been over 30 years since I last rode a bike. One of the most important things I knew from reading this and other bicycle forums is how important it is to get a bike which fits you well. It was startling to see the casual and almost haphazard way most of the stores approached this. Four out of the five stores used what I refer to as the “eyeball” method. That is, the salesman looked me over and then either asked me, or guessed my height. He then grabbed the nearest bike from the overhead racks in the category I was interested in (“comfort” road bikes) in the frame size he guessed would fit. Next, he had me straddle the top tube and asked me how it felt. Now remember, I am almost a complete novice at this point. I was not wearing bicycle shorts—I was wearing jeans. The clearance from the top tube I experienced among the different bikes I tried probably ranged from ¼” to ¾” (or more), yet none of the salesmen ever measured it, nor could they see it due to the cloth of my pants. They then had me climb aboard the saddle, briefly checked the bend of my knee as I put the pedals in the 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock positions, and then they shoved me out the door for a test ride in the parking lot of the store.

The salesman at the store where I bought my bike also used the eyeball method, but that was merely to establish the starting point. After selecting a bike from the rack, he directed me to the back of the store where he mounted the bike in a set of rollers and had me climb aboard. He then proceeded through a set of careful measurements. I particularly took notice when he pulled out an instrument which looked like a giant pair of navigator’s dividers with which he measured my thigh-knee-calf angle at various points during the pedal cycle. He also used a plumb line to determine the correct fore-aft position of the saddle. He repeated this measurement exercise with several different bikes and frame sizes. At the end of this process—which took over a half-hour—he stated that the frame size which fit me best was 52 cm. The frame sizes the other bike stores had me try ranged from 50 cm to 54 cm, and you can imagine the difference in how those different sizes felt to me.

What I am trying to say is that it is easy to see how a novice can be sold an ill-fitting bike and how disappointed I am in the general level of professionalism in the bike stores I visited.

The bike store where I bought my bike was the third one I visited. I didn’t buy from them immediately because, as a novice, I wanted to try as many bikes as possible before making a purchase decision. So, this past Saturday I spent over four hours test-riding bikes from stores numbered four and five. It was at these stores that I rode bikes with frames ranging from 50 cm to 54 cm. Simply because of the level of bikes I was trying—like the Cannondale Synapse, Specialized Roubaix, and Fuji SL 2.0—they all felt good compared to the bikes I had ridden 30 years ago, but they didn’t feel optimal. So, the next day I returned to the store which had fitted me correctly, and I took the two bikes I liked there—the Specialized Roubaix and the Gary Fisher Cronus, both in the 52 cm frame size—out for repeated test rides until I decided on the Cronus. Both of these bikes felt so good that it was very hard picking one. In the end I picked the Cronus because of its stiffness—it felt as though every ounce of energy I put into the pedal transferred into driving the bike forward. A reviewer on a Web site called ride of the Cronus “buttery smooth,” and it felt like that to me. The ride of the Roubaix was truly excellent, as well, but in a slightly different way. I am sure I would have been happy with either bike.

Because I didn’t have any bicycle accessories, I had the bike store hold my bike for me. I placed an order for a Thule Helium bike rack, and I will pick up the bike rack and my new bike this coming Sunday. Tomorrow I am getting a trailer hitch installed on my vehicle for use with the bike rack. I will also be purchasing all the other accessories and gear—such as clothing, water bottles, bike computer, and helmet—in the next week or so. I am certainly doing my part to pump up the economy!

I certainly look forward to sharing my initial impressions of the bike over the next month or so as I get back into cycling. I know I’ll be coming back for advice frequently in the days ahead.
Banded Krait is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 08:43 PM   #23
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20,916
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banded Krait View Post
No, that’s not the case. I actually tried to post some more yesterday evening. That was when I discovered a rather annoying bug—err, feature—of the software behind this forum. Apparently there is an unadvertised inactivity time limit. I had typed a longer than average reply, and when I attempted to post it, I got a message that I would have to log-in, even though I had been logged-in when I began typing my post. So, I logged-in again, only to discover that my reply had vanished in the ether. Man, that was annoying. Any suggestions as to how to avoid this in the future?

Anyway, thanks for all the nice comments. I thought I would recount a little of my selection/shopping experience, for as I said in my original post, the whole process was very enlightening for me.

What surprised me the most was the huge variation in professionalism and service I experienced in the five different local bicycle stores (LBS) I visited during this process. This ranged from what can be described as almost total indifference in not just one, but actually two different stores of the same local chain of LBS, to what I will characterize as the historical seat-of-the-pants level of service in two other stores, to a notably higher level of service, advice, and professionalism at the fifth store. Guess which one I bought the bike at? Given the fact that the country is in the midst of the worst financial downturn since the Great Depression, I would have thought that small businesses like bicycle stores would be clawing for customers, but that’s certainly not what I found.

This was most obvious in the area of determining the correct size of bike for me. As I said in my original post, it has been over 30 years since I last rode a bike. One of the most important things I knew from reading this and other bicycle forums is how important it is to get a bike which fits you well. It was startling to see the casual and almost haphazard way most of the stores approached this. Four out of the five stores used what I refer to as the “eyeball” method. That is, the salesman looked me over and then either asked me, or guessed my height. He then grabbed the nearest bike from the overhead racks in the category I was interested in (“comfort” road bikes) in the frame size he guessed would fit. Next, he had me straddle the top tube and asked me how it felt. Now remember, I am almost a complete novice at this point. I was not wearing bicycle shorts—I was wearing jeans. The clearance from the top tube I experienced among the different bikes I tried probably ranged from ¼” to ¾” (or more), yet none of the salesmen ever measured it, nor could they see it due to the cloth of my pants. They then had me climb aboard the saddle, briefly checked the bend of my knee as I put the pedals in the 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock positions, and then they shoved me out the door for a test ride in the parking lot of the store.

The salesman at the store where I bought my bike also used the eyeball method, but that was merely to establish the starting point. After selecting a bike from the rack, he directed me to the back of the store where he mounted the bike in a set of rollers and had me climb aboard. He then proceeded through a set of careful measurements. I particularly took notice when he pulled out an instrument which looked like a giant pair of navigator’s dividers with which he measured my thigh-knee-calf angle at various points during the pedal cycle. He also used a plumb line to determine the correct fore-aft position of the saddle. He repeated this measurement exercise with several different bikes and frame sizes. At the end of this process—which took over a half-hour—he stated that the frame size which fit me best was 52 cm. The frame sizes the other bike stores had me try ranged from 50 cm to 54 cm, and you can imagine the difference in how those different sizes felt to me.

What I am trying to say is that it is easy to see how a novice can be sold an ill-fitting bike and how disappointed I am in the general level of professionalism in the bike stores I visited.

The bike store where I bought my bike was the third one I visited. I didn’t buy from them immediately because, as a novice, I wanted to try as many bikes as possible before making a purchase decision. So, this past Saturday I spent over four hours test-riding bikes from stores numbered four and five. It was at these stores that I rode bikes with frames ranging from 50 cm to 54 cm. Simply because of the level of bikes I was trying—like the Cannondale Synapse, Specialized Roubaix, and Fuji SL 2.0—they all felt good compared to the bikes I had ridden 30 years ago, but they didn’t feel optimal. So, the next day I returned to the store which had fitted me correctly, and I took the two bikes I liked there—the Specialized Roubaix and the Gary Fisher Cronus, both in the 52 cm frame size—out for repeated test rides until I decided on the Cronus. Both of these bikes felt so good that it was very hard picking one. In the end I picked the Cronus because of its stiffness—it felt as though every ounce of energy I put into the pedal transferred into driving the bike forward. A reviewer on a Web site called ride of the Cronus “buttery smooth,” and it felt like that to me. The ride of the Roubaix was truly excellent, as well, but in a slightly different way. I am sure I would have been happy with either bike.

Because I didn’t have any bicycle accessories, I had the bike store hold my bike for me. I placed an order for a Thule Helium bike rack, and I will pick up the bike rack and my new bike this coming Sunday. Tomorrow I am getting a trailer hitch installed on my vehicle for use with the bike rack. I will also be purchasing all the other accessories and gear—such as clothing, water bottles, bike computer, and helmet—in the next week or so. I am certainly doing my part to pump up the economy!

I certainly look forward to sharing my initial impressions of the bike over the next month or so as I get back into cycling. I know I’ll be coming back for advice frequently in the days ahead.
Pretty good review for a "geezer" -

I would like to know in what city you found these LBS's - as I am sure others would, also.

Welcome, and I think you are going to have a great time with your new bike.
DnvrFox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-11, 09:06 PM   #24
Banded Krait
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Malvern, Pa.
Bikes: Trek Pilot 5.9
Posts: 438
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
I would like to know in what city you found these LBS's - as I am sure others would, also.
I live in the NW suburbs of Philadelphia, Pa. I visited bike stores in both Chester and Montgomery counties during my shopping odyssey.
Banded Krait is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-11, 04:08 PM   #25
NebrVandal
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Omaha, NE
Bikes: Trek 1000, Marin San Rafael, Scott CR 1 Team
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm a 53-year old geezer. After a decade hiatus of road biking, I got my hands on a Scott CR-1 Team, and I love it!
NebrVandal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:27 AM.