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Old 05-30-11, 06:11 PM   #1
tabriz
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Jump from 30 to 40 miles?

Hi, I'm slowly upping my mileage. I've ridden 30 miles 6 or 7 times now, and would like to try 40 miles next week. Do you think that's too big a jump for a 50 year old woman? I'm riding 80-120 miles/week and started last September. I know I could do it, but I wonder how I'll feel afterwards. I don't want to not be able to ride due to having to recover too long!

I would like to ride the Utah Cliffs (280 miles in 6 or 7 days) route this October, so feel I need to start upping my mileage now.

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Old 05-30-11, 06:17 PM   #2
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Not unless riding 30 is a struggle for you already. It doesn't sound like it is since you've done it so many times. I say give it a try. Just take it easy. You'll make it.
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Old 05-30-11, 06:21 PM   #3
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Can you ride 30 miles without a stop? If so, just do two 20 mile rides with a brief break in between. Or just go ride 40. It sounds like your weekly mileage will easily support that distance.
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Old 05-30-11, 06:49 PM   #4
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I don't know about training from books and a bit from my own experience. Several training books I own, (Long Distance Cycling, by Burke and Pavelka and Cycling Past 50 by Friel) stress that when increasing mileage for a planned event to avoid over training by increasing the distances just by 10%. The danger is the possibility of over training to the point where recovery could take some weeks rather than a few days. Also, until the body adjusts to the increased work load there is a possibility of injury as for example, knee issues which seem to be somewhat common.

I'm retired and can ride as many days per week as my body will stand. So far, my limitations are recovery time which is about two days between rides. Recovery is also a major issue with the pros as well as us hackers. Since everyone is different in recovery times, basically pay attention to your own body.
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Old 05-30-11, 06:54 PM   #5
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40 easy miles? 40 miles of hills? Slow? Fast?

If it is 10 more miles of what you have been doing, I say go for it. You can always stop and rest, turn around, etc.
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Old 05-30-11, 06:55 PM   #6
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I would think you could easily do it.
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Old 05-30-11, 07:06 PM   #7
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I've found that the key to longer rides is to make a plan, and stick to it. Know how much you need to drink, how much to eat, when to stop, and so forth. And be sure to stick to the plan. It's easy when you're feeling good to just keep going and not take a break, or to not eat a bar or a gel. But skipping what you know you need will get you on a longer ride, because you can't get it back. And it really stinks to get close to your goal and not be able to finish.
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Old 05-30-11, 07:10 PM   #8
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Given the amount of training you have been doing, 40 miles should not be a problem. 50 or 60 shouldn't be too tough either.
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Old 05-30-11, 07:33 PM   #9
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You need a new bike for 40 miles and up, make sure its at least $1300.00 and up. New outfit to match the new bike. Post pics of the results. Also you need a "Rain bike", it can be of good used quality. This is known as N+1.....you might as well start now as it will surly sneek upon you. If you feel good just go for the 40, it will feel gooood. Good luck and keep up the enthusiasm.
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Old 05-30-11, 07:41 PM   #10
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I found that once I got to twenty, thirty was a breeze and then the fifties just came naturally. Once I
started doing fifty, the rest was a breeze. Just a little more and you can do a hundred. Just pace your
self and allow time for your ride with out rushing it. You can cut time later when you get the feel for
the longer rides.

Remember, you need more water for longer rides and a snack. I take raisins. If you ride alone, make
sure some one knows where and when you are going and check with them when you return. Take
your phone. Don't get lost! Pre flight your bike for the longer rides.
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Old 05-30-11, 08:02 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerlenbach View Post
I've found that the key to longer rides is to make a plan, and stick to it. Know how much you need to drink, how much to eat, when to stop, and so forth. And be sure to stick to the plan. It's easy when you're feeling good to just keep going and not take a break, or to not eat a bar or a gel. But skipping what you know you need will get you on a longer ride, because you can't get it back. And it really stinks to get close to your goal and not be able to finish.
Sorry Kerlenbach,
For the second time in about 1/2 hour I'm agreeing with you. Good advice! It is too easy to keep going when you really feel good and then you bonk for not drinking and eating. To the OP I would say pick a day when you are fairly rested and when conditions are good (not too hot, windy, etc.).
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Old 05-30-11, 08:24 PM   #12
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Somewhere above 30 miles is where proper hydration, nutrition, and rest stops become really key. I can do 30 non-stop with just a bottle of water, but usually 40 requires electrolyte replacement, a snack, and a break somewhere.
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Old 05-30-11, 08:31 PM   #13
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Somewhere above 30 miles is where proper hydration, nutrition, and rest stops become really key. I can do 30 non-stop with just a bottle of water, but usually 40 requires electrolyte replacement, a snack, and a break somewhere.
It's that way with me too...up to about two hours and it's just a little water that I need.
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Old 05-31-11, 06:54 AM   #14
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I'm 59 and I have been training for a century. My training has hardly been going to plan because of weather and personal schedule. I had worked up to 55 miles and then had 3 weeks in a row where all I could fit in was 40-ish for my long ride. Then last Saturday I had the time and the weather and attempted 80 and as it turned out more climbing than the century route itself will have. Other than a saddle sore I have to nurse until next Sunday when the century is scheduled I was fine. I don't think you will have any trouble jumping from 30 to 40 given that you have done 30 so many times. I did the 55 mile ride on nothing but a good breakfast and water but I for sure would not have done the 80 without the power bars I packed along. So at some point soon you will need to start packing fuel as the others are telling you.

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Old 05-31-11, 07:12 AM   #15
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One trick is to go from hilly 30 to gentle 40. You barely notice the difference.
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Old 05-31-11, 07:41 AM   #16
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Just me but my water only non-stop bonk point seems to fall in between 2 and 2-1/2 hours.
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Old 05-31-11, 09:43 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tabriz View Post
Hi, I'm slowly upping my mileage. I've ridden 30 miles 6 or 7 times now, and would like to try 40 miles next week. Do you think that's too big a jump for a 50 year old woman? I'm riding 80-120 miles/week and started last September. I know I could do it, but I wonder how I'll feel afterwards. I don't want to not be able to ride due to having to recover too long!

I would like to ride the Utah Cliffs (280 miles in 6 or 7 days) route this October, so feel I need to start upping my mileage now.

Tabriz
I'm a 55 yr. old woman. If you are riding 80-120 p/w you will have no problem making the jump. Just rmember to eat & drink!
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Old 05-31-11, 09:57 AM   #18
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The older I get I find that I need to map out the potty stops on my route. While a man can just find a nearby tree or the side of the building (as they do in France); a woman like yourself may have to consider a restroom. Then there is the problem of leaving your bike unguarded outside the service station, etc. So be sure to take along your locking device. Take your wallet, keys, and cellphone into the "stall" with you. Don't leave them on the bike.

And speaking of longer rides, be prepared for flat tires and other breakdowns. The farther you go, the more inconvenient this will be. If you can't repair your own flat tire, you should not go more than 10 miles from home.
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Old 05-31-11, 10:59 AM   #19
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Wow, glad I asked! The idea of bringing food hadn't occurred to me! It will be a hilly (to me anyway) route. I'll tack on the extra 10 to a route I've done before. I can ask DH to do a "drive by" to see how I'm doing around mile 35, so if I'm dying he could pick me up. But if I get to 35 I'd probably rather walk the last 5 than give up and take the car ride.

As for potty breaks, this route is out of town so I'll be able to find a convenient bush if necessary.

Thanks for all the posts and advice! I'll post a status report when I'm done, weather permitting!

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Old 05-31-11, 11:16 AM   #20
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Plenty of water-sufficient food and the occasional out of the saddle riding for Butt Breaks.

I was in training a few years ago and I rode with a buncg of mountain bikers and we did 30 to 40 miles every Sunday. To improve my milage we used to do an Extra 10 miles on the road after the Offroad ride. Then increased to offroad up to 65 and still got in the extra 10 on the road.

So if you are on a "Hilly" 30 now and are worried- get the last 10 over a less hilly route. Providing you feel fine after that 40--Get the entry in for a Metric and go for it. If the last 10 hurt- then keep doing your current 30 for a few weeks and then try the 40 again.

But 30 now--you will be fine on a 40. Just don't try for any speed records.----Well not for a couple of weeks at least.
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Old 06-02-11, 12:50 PM   #21
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Hang the age thing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tabriz View Post
Do you think that's too big a jump for a 50 year old woman?
Tabriz
the jump from a 30 mile ride to a 100 mile ride is largely dependent upon your ability to dial in your calorie and hydration needs

about the 'too big a jump for a 50 yr old woman' thing...
At 50 I bought a bike (hadn't ridden one for 30 yrs) and a year later completed a 1200k (780 miles) in 74 hours. YOU have the ability to achieve your goals too... Just be persistant and don't be afraid of rising to the challenge!
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Old 06-02-11, 05:00 PM   #22
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Yes!!!!
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Old 06-02-11, 05:48 PM   #23
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30 to 40 miles is a step, not a jump. Just watch your step (fuel, hydration, pacing) and you'll be fine.
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Old 06-02-11, 08:16 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAriverRat View Post
You need a new bike for 40 miles and up, make sure its at least $1300.00 and up. New outfit to match the new bike. Post pics of the results. Also you need a "Rain bike", it can be of good used quality. This is known as N+1.....you might as well start now as it will surly sneek upon you. If you feel good just go for the 40, it will feel gooood. Good luck and keep up the enthusiasm.
You are a RAT! This is TMI for a noob. You will scare her away! We all know this is GREAT advice, but it is to be used as the JUSTIFICATION to the spouse/SO. We all know she will soon be looking for these sorts of excuses...
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Old 06-02-11, 08:34 PM   #25
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Heck-you're ready to jump up to some 60 milers!
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