Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    I've lost that carefree feeling.

    It's been almost 2 years since the accident that broke both of my elbows. I feel like I've recovered physically, at least to the point where I should be able to ride, but mentally I'm still not there.

    Our first attempt was to spend a ton of money to buy recumbent bikes to replace our fleet. What I didn't count on was the recumbent learning curve. Every detail was like inventing the wheel for me. I've finally reached the point where I feel like I'm nearly a competant recumbent rider. I can maintain around the same speed as I did previously on diamond frame bikes, but I still avoid hills and, just this morning, I started using the water pack drinking device.

    Last summer and fall I even had several sessions with a psychologist to work through the anxiety I was having concerning bicycling. I was making progress and Mrs. Grouch and I were even handling the tandem pretty confidentally.

    Then, a couple of weeks ago, I assume that Mrs. Grouch had an attack of vertigo while we were attempting to get the tandem launched. Over we went and I got a concussion serious enough that I don't remember about a half hour window of time. I'm back to having that weak kneed feeling (only in my elbows) whenever I think about rideing.

    I'm back riding again but I envy the helmetless people I see riding department store POS bikes wearing flip-flops on their feet. I used to have that devil-may-care attitude about just hopping on a bike and riding, but I've lost it and I miss it.

  2. #2
    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    My Bikes
    Simoncini, Gary Fisher, Specialized Tarmac
    Posts
    4,054
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I lost it about 35 years ago. Being conservative is not a bad thing.
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

  3. #3
    Senior Member NOS88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    6,379
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personal injury can impact on us in many ways. I hope you find a path out of where you are right now. If it were me, I'd take it slow and reduce my expectations just a bit. You know, just get on the bike as much as possible without pushing distance, time, effort, etc. Riding is such a joy, when not hurt or fearing injury, that I'm sure it will come back over time.
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. - S. Wright

  4. #4
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
    My Bikes
    Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
    Posts
    19,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    1999 and a Bypass- got over it well and was in training for the BIG ride I used to do and in 2001 contracted Prostate Cancer.Got over the op and was doing a few rides by the end of the year that I should not have done--They hurt but mentally I was OK.

    Then in 2002 the brain started to go wrong. Still riding with my offroad group- still getting the milage in and still doing the rides BUT-------

    Why should I attempt to be the first one up the hill?

    Why should I worry about walking up hills that I previously rode? It was only a hill and it will still be there next week.

    Why should I worry about doing the milage?

    Answer to all these was that I had just survived Cancer and I shouldn't be doing these sorts of rides. I ought to think about taking it easier after the medical problems and get myself a road bike for an easier time.

    Bit of time passed and an offroad Tandem was bought so someone can get me up the hills---WRONG-- Tandems are hard as you know and you cannot take it easy on them when hard work is to be done. Ran through a series of Co-Riders that were useless and met Stuart. We got riding and I started thinking. Still thought about the easier time on the road bikes but decided on a Kill or Cure remedy.

    That ride I was in training for in 2001 when PCa set in was still there. The hardest off road ride in the UK in one day and it was hard. I had last done it in 97 and took a break in 98 and in 99 the bypass. Had 7 months to get fit enough to attempt it with Stuart on the tandem so trained. When i say trained I mean trained. offroad rides up to 65 miles at the weekend- 3 nights aweek in the gym and twice a week for 30 mile offroad night rides. That training did hurt but I got fit enough to do the South Downs Way in june 2003.

    What got me over my spell of lack of enthusiasm was setting a goal. Something I had to work for. It was going to be hard and I had to get fit-No---Ultra fit -to be able to do it. It worked.

    At least it delayed the Advent to an easier time by going road for 3 more years.

    So set a goal- Something you have to work for but don't go as stupid as I did by setting the target way up high. You are older than me and I have now had 10 yearsto come to my senses and realise how high that target was. Just settle on something that is going to push you and you will have to train for. That training will get the body right and hopefully the adrenalyn of training with those 20 year old Nubile blondes at the gym will get the brain right.




    And when you find the 20 year old Nubile blondes let me know where they are. All I ever found were the 40 year old obese that had been ordered by the doc to lose weight- otherwise their benefits got stopped.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


    Spike Milligan

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Malvern, Pa.
    My Bikes
    Trek Pilot 5.9
    Posts
    432
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    RG,

    Traumatic experiences stick with us because the extreme emotions we experience at the time help make the memories longer lasting. In essence, you are suffering from a light form of post traumatic stress disorder.

    The simplest way get over this is to start small and slowly increase the length of your rides. Even if you just ride around the block, completing a ride successfully will start to degrade the brain circuit that has formed which associates riding with a painful event. Each successful ride you take will wear down the circuit further until it is gone.

    If you find your anxiety to be extreme, you might consider hypnosis to help you get over it. Although I don't have a practice, I am a certified hypnotist, and hypnosis can definitely help many people overcome many types of phobias and fears. Here is an interesting video about hypnosis: http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/s1440855.htm . It is from the Australian Broadcasting Company; they have a weekly TV "magazine" show called Catalyst. This segment was about hypnosis and is very well done. One of the things it shows is how a young woman overcomes a paralyzing fear of spiders through hypnosis. (Try to ignore the first minute or so of the story which focuses on stage show hypnosis. Stage show hypnosis tends to give the whole field a bad reputation.) To watch the video, just click on one of the links immediately to the right of the movie camera icon in the center of the page.

  6. #6
    Randomhead
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    12,309
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    my co-worker just broke a couple of bones. He's not 30 yet, but you can see the change in his attitude towards risk. Probably a good thing, although I haven't been riding with him since the accident. I'd be annoyed if I had to wait for him at the bottom of hills. I'm no longer the kind of person that rides down hills out of control, so if someone is behind me they are working too hard to be there.

  7. #7
    Has opinion, will express
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    12,300
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Banded Krait View Post
    RG,

    Traumatic experiences stick with us because the extreme emotions we experience at the time help make the memories longer lasting. In essence, you are suffering from a light form of post traumatic stress disorder.
    Yes.

    I have an inkling of Retro's feelings. I just got out alive in the 2009 Victorian bushfires that killed more than 170 people, including 34 in a nearby township. I lost a lot of interest in cycling right then, despite having put in my fastest century the month before and being, arguably, the fittest I had been in decades.

    When Machka arrived to live in Australia about six months later, we went for a ride. I came up to a corner with no shoulder and a log truck bearing down. Normally, it wouldn't have bothered me, and it didn't bother Machka just ahead of me. But I bailed into the ditch. I was very nervous.

    And about six weeks after Machka arrived, she was hospitalised for a fortnight with deep vein thrombosis. She went on to medications that affected her physical activity, and, because of our living arrangements post-bushfires, our opportunities to ride were sporadic. We put in centuries, and randonnees up to 300km, but we weren't really enjoying them and DNFed quite a few, including short 100km events.

    We are also both battling to get off weight.

    Last August, things started to improve somewhat when a fellow randonneur lent us a tandem to try out. It helped tremendously and we bought our own in January.

    We had set our goal as being Paris-Brest-Paris in August this year, but our lack of fitness and motivation after the DNFs had us as non-qualified, and settling for a trip instead to Vancouver to see Machka's folks and tour a bit around that area.

    We've slowly been getting back our motivation to build fitness and despite being winter here, I have been enjoying our weekend rides a lot more, and we are now looking at doing more indoor training.

    The goal of touring on Vancouver Island is one of the reasons. Getting our bodies back in shape for the new summer season is another. And the desire just to feel better is a third reason.

    Oh, and a bit of retail therapy along the way -- new Ti bikes for each of us, the tandem, and some good cold-weather riding gear, for example -- has helped. I mean... you buy, you gotta use it, eh.

    So, yes, it can be a long haul, but worth it, I think.

    Retro, you mentioned something about envying someone who just jumps on their bike and goes without helmet, in sneakers on platform pedals. Have you tried doing that, too?
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
    Retro, you mentioned something about envying someone who just jumps on their bike and goes without helmet, in sneakers on platform pedals. Have you tried doing that, too?
    Sort of. A week ago I took my beater bike out for what should have been an easy ride. I did wear my helmet, gloves and bike shoes. I don't know if it's due to getting acclimated to riding recumbents or just lack of fitness, but the strain of lifting my head to see forward caused pain in my lower neck and my shoulders. It was HOT too. Eventually I called Mrs. Grouch to rescue me.

    I've ordered a much shorter stem with a 30 degree rise but it'll be this week end before I'll be able to install that and try it out. I hope that it works because I loved taking that bike up to the convenience market and near-by hardware store.

    Perversly, it's comforting to know that riders' like yourselves go through the same kind of anxietie and low points. It's really neat to have this kind of forum to air out a problem and hear how other folks have delt with similar challenges.
    Last edited by Retro Grouch; 06-06-11 at 06:37 AM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Billings, Montana
    My Bikes
    Trek 2100, Trek 960, Trek 2300, Novara Randonee, Specialized Langster
    Posts
    388
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As one becomes older, one naturally becomes more conservative where injury and danger are possible consequences. Nothing to worry about. Jump on your bike and do what feels safe and comfortable. No one is critiquing your performance. Too often we worry about things that should really be of no concern, and so we spoil some fun that we could have had. I am not as strong a cyclist as I used to be, but that is natural because I am older. No big deal. Sometimes we think to critically of ourselves. The key to an enjoyable life as an older person is to stop making judgements and just do the things you love to do as best as you can. If you're a little afraid of some elements of cycling, don't worry. Do what you are comfortable with. Eventually you will establish a new norm for your cycling performance.
    Trek 2300
    Trek 2100

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •