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  1. #26
    Sore saddle cyclist Shifty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_V View Post
    So does the metric century take a completely different route than the century? Most of the rides I have been on use a common route, normally the shortest ride, and branch off of that route to roads that return to the common route to add the miles. If this is the case where you are at, a metric century is only 62 miles. Pretty much guarantees that you'll be at that party. But then again, once you have ridden a century, you can say you have ridden a bike.



    The SAG stations usually have energy food; granola bars, bananas, some have extra gel packs. They also have water and Gator Aid. I have never seen them run out of water and if you want to ride with the extra weight on your back, bring your camelback.



    Yes, it's a mix. I mix it up before the ride and carry it in a water bottle behind my seat. I also have a small handlebar bag that I use to carry extra gel packs and chews. I try not to put too much stuff in my jersey pockets because the weight sits right on the area of your back that is bent the most and the longest.



    Absolutely! There are always going to be riders that are faster than you are and there will always be riders that are slower than you. I'm 64 and the last distance ride I did was a half century (had anemia) and I did it in 3h 28m. Almost 4 hours if you include the SAG stops. Not the first rider in, but definitely not the last of the ones doing the half century.

    Make up a training schedule and plan, follow it and don't worry. You'll do fine! Enjoy the ride .... it's a great feeling when you get done.
    Yes, completely different route for the metric. See map here for metric route marked in solid red lines http://skinnytireevents.com/images/s...Elevations.pdf
    Those voices in your head aren't real, but they have some great ideas

  2. #27
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    Ok, I just map my ride it. http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/37473306#climbs Looks like the climbs are 2.5 to 3.5 grade. That's not too bad. But I better keep practicing hills!

    Tabriz

  3. #28
    gone ride'n cyclinfool's Avatar
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    You have a compact, what's your cassette? If it is a 12-25 I would consider an 11-28 unless you are really confident on a long grade and have been riding a lot.
    "Of all the things I ever lost I miss my mind the most." Mark Twain
    If all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

  4. #29
    Senior Member EsoxLucius's Avatar
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    Here is a simple training plan for a century. It looks like you are already at a level where it should not be too difficult to increase your long rides, but I wouldn't think it necessary to exceed 75 miles. If you are already riding 150 miles a week, you can likely keep your rides during the week about the same and just increase the length of your long ride. Just take it a little easier the week of the ride.

    Week One: Long Ride - 25 miles, Total miles/week - 55
    Week Two: Long Ride - 30 miles, Total miles/week - 65
    Week Three: Long Ride - 35 miles, Total miles/week - 73
    Week Four: Long Ride - 40 miles, Total miles/week - 81
    Week Five: Long Ride - 45 miles, Total miles/week - 90
    Week Six: Long Ride - 50 miles, Total miles/week - 99
    Week Seven: Long Ride - 57 miles, Total miles/week - 110
    Week Eight: Long Ride - 65 miles, Total miles/week - 122
    Week Nine: Long Ride - 50 miles, Total miles/week - 75
    Week Ten: Long Ride - Century, Total miles/week - Whatever

    Stay properly hydrated. Start increasing your hydration starting three days before the century and then drink Gatorade G2 during the ride.
    You could burn as many as 5200 calories on a century ride so plan your eating accordingly.
    Last edited by EsoxLucius; 06-14-11 at 10:29 AM.

  5. #30
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    Cyclinfool, The website says: Shimano Ultegra, 10-speed, 11-28t for my bike. But, I'm always looking for another gear on hills. I wonder if they can put a triple on this bike?

    Tabriz

  6. #31
    Sore saddle cyclist Shifty's Avatar
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    Here is a link to a better ride profile, look at the chart for Day One, Dead Horse. This chart shows the 65 miles that are of interest, the balance of the century rides along the Colorado River and is basically flat. http://skinnytireevents.com/images/s...Elevations.pdf
    Those voices in your head aren't real, but they have some great ideas

  7. #32
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    Thanks, Esoxlucius, According to that training guide I feel more confident. I do think I have to work on hills, though.

  8. #33
    Senior Member CHAS's Avatar
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    I lived on the route they are using for the metric for two years. The grades hit 19% on the Big Nasty. There is one short bit on the way up to Spanish Point that shows 20% in the right hand lane.
    The climb to Canyonlands and dead horse include 8% climbs.
    Both are great rides.
    The stops are well supplied with food, water and sports drinks. The people of Moab are great.
    People ride both routes frequently with standard chainwheel sets. I used a triple.
    May have to go myself.
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  9. #34
    Broom Wagon Fodder reverborama's Avatar
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    PatW's advice is excellent -especially the part about how much it hurts to start riding again after you've stopped. Most organized century rides have 4 or 5 stops stocked with all kinds of energy bars, bananas, and muffins. The tendency is to hang out there too long. After 75 miles, when you get back on the bike it's going to hurt so bad you will swear there is no way you can make it. This is one of the few things you actually have to gut out. After a few hundred yards you will being to feel better but the first time it happened to me, I really thought I was done. Luckily I had no choice but to continue and began to feel better after about a half mile.

    If you google around for a century training plan you will find there are many to choose from and most are pretty much the same. One thing that is interesting is they all suggest riding a metric (65 miles) the week before your century. This really is, IMHO, really important. You will recover in time for the event and even if you fail to complete the metric, you should learn enough to pull off the 100.

    The only other advice I'd give is to relate a story from a century I rode here one April. The night before I broke my front shifter cable. I replaced it but before the start I had one of the mechanics check my work. Big mistake. He touched it with a screwdriver and pronounced it fine. After we got out of the big parking lot and into a place where I wanted to shift to the big ring, I found I couldn't get into it. Not willing to stop, dig out the tool kit, and screw around on the side of the road, I rode the 20 miles to the first stop in the small ring (34 teeth), spinning at 100 -110 RPM the whole way. This turned out to be the best thing I could have done. A lot of people burned themselves out riding too fast at the beginning and that really began to show at the 70 mile mark where the lines for the sag bus were very long. Oh yeah, it was 45 degrees and raining. Did I leave that out? Anyway, don't go too fast at the beginning and you will do just fine.

  10. #35
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
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    Also, something that I left out previously, don't forget to stretch. Do a full set of stretching exercises before the ride (at least 10 minutes) and every time you stop at a SAG station, do some stretching when you get off the bike and then again when you are ready to head out. When you are done, do another 10 minute routine.

    If you are going to spend the night at a motel at the end of the ride, take a hot shower and when you are done, let the hot water run on your legs for about 4-5 minutes or until the hot water runs out. The hot water will cause the muscle tissue to relax and keep your legs from cramping or feeling like jelly. Between the hot shower and the stretching, your legs will feel as if though they were never on a bike the next morning. I do this on all my long rides with overnight stays and it works wonders.
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  11. #36
    Senior Member EsoxLucius's Avatar
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    Just remember if before the ride you don't warm up before stretching it is practically worthless. I wouldn't do much more than a brief stretch of quads, hammies and calfs during rest stops, if I would stretch at all. If you are bikeing 150+ miles a week and are consistently doing a 50+ mile ride and up to a 65-75 mile ride before the event you are in plenty of shape to complete a century. I've found that not stopping for more than 10-15 minutes and being appropriately hydrated and nourished is more important than stretching during an event. I like the idea of stretching after and the hot shower though.

  12. #37
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    I have a similar plan to yours Tabriz. I'm working on getting in shape for a club century in September. I worked out a schedule of distances to work up to by the end of each month. Last Friday I rode 60 miles and, to my surprise, felt pretty good the next day. In July I will work up to 75 miles but it will be very hot and humid by then.

    Your century has a hill with the intimidating name of "The Big Nasty" and the elevation profile indicates elevation gain of 3000 feet in 7 miles which works out to an average of 8% slope. But as we know, the devil is in the details, and as Chas has said, just above, a few sections will be well more than that.

    My century takes place on the relatively flat regions of coastal Rhode Island and Massachusetts. However, I'm way older than you so my gearing is way lower, not only for the century but for light touring in New Hampshire which has mountains. I have installed lower gearing but I'm also climbing every hill in sight near my home and can see myself getting a bit stronger each week.

    Your rear cassette has a low cog of 28 teeth which for many people is low enough. You may want to try some steepish hills or even "The Big Nasty", if it is close to you to see how you feel about your gearing.

  13. #38
    The Professor akohekohe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabriz View Post
    http://skinnytireevents.com/images/s...Elevations.pdf

    This is the website showing the elevation change. It looks like I only really have to ride 50 miles, then coast downhill the rest of the way. However, I know that is probably misleading! It looks steeper than what I'm accustomed to. I live at the bottom of Sandia Mountain, which climbs 3,000 feet in I think 12 miles, but I haven't tried it, yet. I'm thinking getting used to the long miles is more important at this point than trying to get up that mountain? The course I do ride is hilly, but not as steep as the Sandias.
    Well, absolutely start climbing. If the Sandia Mountain you are talking about is the one I'm looking at on the map it is a lot tougher than anything you will face on the century. I'm playing around with roads in your area on RideWithGPS and it doesn't look like it would be too hard to find a route where the elevation profile is close to the century, where you are climbing about 2,000 feet in 30 miles. I would start working on that 30 mile climb just so you can learn how to pace yourself. Now, if it was me I would also start working on climbing Sandia - it looks like lots of fun and you'll gain a lot of confidence doing that tough hill. Plus riding at elevation will make you stronger. Don't worry about the time climbing at first, just enjoy the climb and you'll get faster the more you do it. The other thing is to get used to riding into the wind. You probably are already since you commute, but really make it a point of going out when it is really windy and doing some good long stretches into the wind. Then if you get hit with wind on the century you'll be prepared. Now, my final piece of advice, which no one else will agree with I'm sure, don't wait until the organized century to do your first century. Just keep mapping out rides that are a bit longer and work up to it. Then, keep going till you can do 120 miles. Then when you do the organized century you can really enjoy the socializing, which is what organized rides are really for, and not have to worry about whether or not you'll finish.
    The more you drive the less intelligent you are. - Tracy Walter as Miller in Repo Man.

  14. #39
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    I was supposed to do 55 miles this past Saturday, but ended up with just 50. http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/38020600#climbs
    But, it was hillier than the 50 I did the week before, so that counts, right? Instead of going down towards town the last 6 miles I went back up. It was much harder than my previous 50. I did take gu and Perpetuam. The Gu was like warm melted chocolate, yum! I could get even fatter than I am on that! The Perpetuam, not so much. But I did feel ok at the end. Tired, but ok.

    I talked to my neighbor, who is a "real" biker, and he said if I could do the route I did Saturday, I should be able to do the climb up Sandia Mt. at least to the ski area, the first 6 miles http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/38150500. Not sure how to incorporate that, though. Should I do that instead of a long Saturday ride sometimes, or do it during the week instead of a commute day? Or do it first, up and down, then go ride another 40 (if I can)?

    Thank you for all the advice, everyone!

    Tabriz

  15. #40
    Sore saddle cyclist Shifty's Avatar
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    So keep training, the ride is totally worth the effort. Here is the view from the turn around point at Dead Horse State Park.



    Those voices in your head aren't real, but they have some great ideas

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