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VertigoFlyer 10-24-11 10:41 AM

A unique way to deal with demon possessed dogs
 
I've had my own share of run ins with evil demon possessed dogs. Here is a unique method for dealing with them:

Big Dog Bark!!

BTW this Blog happens to be one of my favorites. I read it daily! No it's not mine...

CraigB 10-24-11 11:48 AM

This is the thinking behind my shouting "NO!" in as large and deep a voice as I can muster. That and the hope that the dog has heard the command enough times before that somewhere in his brain stem is an automatic reaction to stop, at least for a split-second.

BlazingPedals 10-24-11 01:37 PM

My fav dog-deterrent almost happened on yesterday's ride. As I rode by one house where a man was raking leaves, a large dog suddenly broke from behind the man and hit the pavement right behind me, toenails a-clattering. The mini-van who'd been getting ready to pass me almost nailed it.

t4mv 10-24-11 01:38 PM

Hmmm, I'd like to imitate a pit bull in a full on Michael Vick death match; combined w/ VF's link suggestion, that would be most satisfying, indeed. Especially if I can end up chasing the dog for a while. :D

BigAura 10-24-11 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CraigB (Post 13406632)
This is the thinking behind my shouting "NO!" in as large and deep a voice as I can muster. That and the hope that the dog has heard the command enough times before that somewhere in his brain stem is an automatic reaction to stop, at least for a split-second.

+1. I do same and it does give you an extra second to make your getaway.

bigbadwullf 10-24-11 01:49 PM

Ruff ruff.

Keith99 10-24-11 01:54 PM

The biggest problem with dogs is it can be very difficult to guess their intensions.

My original pair would have been a nightmare for the tough guy attitude, and that includes this version.

Now mine rarely got out, so no danger to people. And the way to go was to treat them as friendly (and if they did get out and were away from home it is doubtful they would seem aggressive).

But they would present a very real danger to a cyclist with the bark strategy. Why? because they would see that as an invitation to play. A playful jump can translate to a broken collarbone.

Actually the waterbottle squirt is a pretty good idea, most dogs dislike it, but no harm, no revenge trigger in the dogs. With my pair one would hate it, the other not. But the one would did not hate it would have enjoyed it, which would have been more than enough distraction to let you be gone.

Wogster 10-24-11 04:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VertigoFlyer (Post 13406319)
I've had my own share of run ins with evil demon possessed dogs. Here is a unique method for dealing with them:

Big Dog Bark!!

BTW this Blog happens to be one of my favorites. I read it daily! No it's not mine...

I'm wondering if one of those boat air horns would work, Okay mutt, try this on for size, BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARP!!!!!!

Phil85207 10-24-11 04:30 PM

I still like a can of wasp and hornet spray. It sprays 15 feet in a straight line.

BigAura 10-24-11 05:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phil85207 (Post 13408082)
I still like a can of wasp and hornet spray. It sprays 15 feet in a straight line.

I hope you are joking. Spraying poison chemical into a dogs face is very cruel and wrong. If you must, use pepper spray that will not cause permanent damage.

BlazingPedals 10-24-11 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BigAura (Post 13408205)
I hope you are joking. Spraying poison chemical into a dogs face is very cruel and wrong. If you must, use pepper spray that will not cause permanent damage.

Crashing due to a dog attack could cause permanent damage to ME. I wouldn't havewasp spray with me unless it was a repeat problem, but you can be certain that if it was, the dog's welfare would be way down my list of priorities.

genec 10-24-11 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CraigB (Post 13406632)
This is the thinking behind my shouting "NO!" in as large and deep a voice as I can muster. That and the hope that the dog has heard the command enough times before that somewhere in his brain stem is an automatic reaction to stop, at least for a split-second.

My method too. Never had it fail yet.

Works on some motorists too.

B. Carfree 10-24-11 06:38 PM

I just couldn't bring myself to yell (or bark) at the last dog that chased me. Actually, he was more of an undernourished rat named Buck, and his owner was hobbling after him as fast as he could. I stopped so the owner could catch up and carry Buck home. We exchanged some friendly words and he clearly understood how awful it would be for Buck to get in front of a bike heading down the hill as opposed to up. He was setting to work on the fence as I rode home later that day.

Why is it nice people have harmless dogs and jerks have pit bulls?

Louis 10-24-11 06:56 PM

One of my many dog encounters featured a not-so-pleasant conversation with the dogs owner. He finally told me that I should "stay in the city where I belong...this is the country".

:rolleyes:

B. Carfree 10-24-11 07:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Louis (Post 13408679)
One of my many dog encounters featured a not-so-pleasant conversation with the dogs owner. He finally told me that I should "stay in the city where I belong...this is the country".

:rolleyes:

I love that one. I've had that line delivered to me by folks who lived in the suburbs that I passed through on my way to work from home. At the time, I lived sixty miles from the city along a river in the forest in what I also considered to be the suburbs. I consider anyplace where most of the people living there commute into the city to be a suburb. If most of the people make their living off of the land or the place is unpopulated, then it is rural.

HawkOwl 10-24-11 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phil85207 (Post 13408082)
I still like a can of wasp and hornet spray. It sprays 15 feet in a straight line.

Let us see now: Spraying a poison in an uncontrolled way in public. Owner and maybe the owner's children are exposed when they contact the dog. Bystanders are exposed to poison depending on wind. Dog dies due to poison. Yep, just the way to deal with the situation.:rolleyes:

Louis 10-24-11 08:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by B. Carfree (Post 13408769)
I love that one. I've had that line delivered to me by folks who lived in the suburbs that I passed through on my way to work from home. At the time, I lived sixty miles from the city along a river in the forest in what I also considered to be the suburbs. I consider anyplace where most of the people living there commute into the city to be a suburb. If most of the people make their living off of the land or the place is unpopulated, then it is rural.

Agreed.


I almost laughed in his face when he said that. I grew up around farms, I had horses as a kid, I've bailed hay, I've shoveled manure. Still can't figure out what made him think I was a city boy.:rolleyes:

Sgt Mac 10-24-11 09:04 PM

One of my neighbors psycho dogs got out and was waiting for me at the end of my driveway. I locked up the brakes on my bike, pulled out my trusty K-Bar (USMC Fighting knife) & offered my arm to the dog all the while wearing a menacing warface and yelling come on MFR You want some of this, come and get it. All the while I am marching toward the dog with my left arm out front as bait. But I accomplished exactly what I thought I would. The last thing he thought was that I would stand up to him an 80+lb German Sheppard, I backed him all the way off my property and back on to his, with his head down and tail tucked. Had he actually bitten me I would have decapitated him. Sounds cruel, but I have a daughter and had he thought he could terrorize us with impunity and attacked my little girl, I shudder to think of what I would have done to the owners.

Wogster 10-25-11 05:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Louis (Post 13408679)
One of my many dog encounters featured a not-so-pleasant conversation with the dogs owner. He finally told me that I should "stay in the city where I belong...this is the country".

:rolleyes:

Yes and the country way to deal with a dog that is attacking you is a 12 gauge or at least a 22, which does not bode well for the dog. I still say, it's not the dogs fault, it's the owners.... The owner should have the dog properly trained or keep the dog tied up. I've seen dogs that were trained to know how to guard property, and they wouldn't dream of chasing a car or a bicycle down the street, unless that car or bicycle came onto their property, then of course if the person was known by the dog, they would still be okay.

gcottay 10-25-11 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sgt Mac (Post 13409210)
. . . I locked up the brakes on my bike . . .

Over the years I've found this sudden STOP a key for dealing with potentially troublesome dogs. That not only transforms us from chase toy or potential prey to human but also provides us with a stable platform for whatever action is required. Almost all dogs prove either friendly or disinterested. Others can receive our full attention whether that means a loud "No! Bad dog!," the swing of a frame pump or the promise of a K-Bar insertion.

BigAura 10-25-11 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BlazingPedals (Post 13408327)
Crashing due to a dog attack could cause permanent damage to ME. I wouldn't havewasp spray with me unless it was a repeat problem, but you can be certain that if it was, the dog's welfare would be way down my list of priorities.

Wait a minute, who's repeating the problem, you or the dog? Once again, use pepper spay if you must, NOT TOXIC CHEMICALS. Plus, aren't you BlazingPedals who should be able to out pedal a dog.

bkaapcke 10-25-11 10:56 AM

Challenging dogs can be a rewarding proposition. I've done it myself many times with good results. First, some rules.The larger dogs who aren't making any noise and aren't bothering you should be left alone. They are the self confident ones who know there is no need to prove themselves by making noise. They will deal with you if they have to, and they're able to do so. Second, leave all pit bulls alone. Avoid them, and run if you have to.

Most of the rest are insecure dogs who think making lots of noise lets their owners know they are "on the job". They quickly fold when challenged. Or you can simply chase them so far away that they will never find their way home. This usually solves the problem permanently.

The 'big bark' works well too. Once, on a walk through the neighborhood, an owner was in the front yard gardening. Her dog was on the sidewalk, barking like mad at me, while I was across the street. I stopped and let this go on for a few minutes, with no response from the owner. I walked across the street, dropped to my knees in front of the dog. "Face to face', the barking continued. I grabbed his collar, twisted it tight, and let out the big bark while we were nose to nose. When I let go the dog it ran off, whimpering all the way. It was an inside dog after that. bk

BlazingPedals 10-25-11 01:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BigAura (Post 13411089)
Wait a minute, who's repeating the problem, you or the dog? Once again, use pepper spay if you must, NOT TOXIC CHEMICALS. Plus, aren't you BlazingPedals who should be able to out pedal a dog.

No, I can't always outrun a dog. Oh, small and medium-sized dogs on flat ground are not a big problem unless they're lying in wait for you. But the big ones can sprint faster than any bike. I've done all the stuff listed by others, at one time or another. Chasing a cowardly German Shepard back home was a fun one. But some dogs just don't give up. Ever had a pack of three of them encircle you? I have. For them, it's either them or you. I presume from your reaction that their welfare is more important to you than you are?

bkaapcke 10-25-11 05:23 PM

Are we supposed to worry about damaging the dog? Nah, no way. bk

larwyn 10-25-11 06:04 PM

Nope! Never worry about damaging the dog, just worry about the dog's owner damaging you in retaliation! You people are full of it.

There seems to have been quite a bit of imagination involved in creating some of the fairy tales posted in this thread. No doubt inspired by all the video games which have replaced real life experiences for many of the worlds less fortunate souls. If some of you had been given a dog and the responsibility of caring for it instead of a TV, a video game, an I pod or a cell phone, you would have a better grasp of reality. It is amazing how ignorance of the canine world can result in the ignorant spreading such large helpings of bovine waste.


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