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  1. #1
    Senior Member GaryPitts's Avatar
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    Any 50+ers in normal health have issues going to a road bike?

    I'm thinking stongly about getting a CX bike to use as a road hybrid with drop bars if you will. Not quite a year ago when I got my hybrid, my first bike, I had a heck of a time with neck pain after moderately long rides. I ended up putting a stem riser on which fixed things up nicely and neck pain is no longer an issue. So, I'm wondering if getting into the drops is going to cause this problem all over again. I know no one can speak for me and my particular scenario, but I'm wondering if anyone else out there went to their first drop bar bike after 50+ and have any pro or con experiences to share. I'm thinking about dropping a couple of grand on this thing and I'd hate to get something I couldn't ride but for 20 miles without pain
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    Senior Member bigbadwullf's Avatar
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    I have a road bike. I rarely/ever ride "in the drops". Pretty much always on the brake hoods. Borrowed a friend's cyclocross bike for a century ride and couldn't tell the difference between the two except for the crappy brakes on his bike . I completely forgot I was on his bike except when I needed to use the brakes.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member jmccain's Avatar
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    I've been riding road bikes since the great Bike Boom so I'm probably the wrong person to reply. But since I've had periods that I let my riding lapse and had to get back in shape, I may be able to respond in a helpful manner.

    If you do not have any unusual health or structural problems, you, like most everyone else, should have no problems once you build up the muscles required to hold your neck and head in position. If you want to get a jump on getting in this shape, I'd suggest you do some simple neck exercises.

    Good luck on your purchase!

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    Semper Fi, A way of life. qcpmsame's Avatar
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    You can probably adjust saddle height and fore/aft position as well as stem drop/rise, reach to take care of your neck problems. It worked well for me.

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    The Left Coast, USA FrenchFit's Avatar
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    Yes. But yoga, spin class with the bars lower than the saddle, lots of riding, rotating off your butt into a flat back position, and the result is my bars keep getting lower and I do ride in the drops comfortably.

    It takes time and intention. You learn alot about your fit and fitness along the way. I think the benefits carry over into general health and posture.

    If you come from a background of virtually no road bike riding for 40 years it will take time, like years.

    That was my experience.

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    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
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    For me, drops are for downhill and fighting winds. Learn to tuck your chin in to your chest and move your whole head back, do not tilt your head up from the chin, straining the neck. My PT taught me this.
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  7. #7
    Senior Member bud16415's Avatar
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    We all age at different rates and I don’t think the number is as important as the wear and tear we put our bodies thru getting to whatever age it is we are at. I see guys in their 50’s, 60’s and sometimes 70’s still riding low drops with no pain or issues. That wasn’t the case for me and through a good number of used bikes when getting back into riding around age 50 I learned a lot about self-fitting that’s not in the young guy at the LBS vocabulary. In my case the legs, lungs and heart are all cooperating pretty well still, but like you the neck, back, wrists etc. were my limiting factor. The solution was more upright the problem was the hybrid bikes didn’t seem to fill the needs I had ether. I read a lot on the topic and found for me more of a “French Fit” helped along with figuring out how to move drop bars up and back to counteract the reach problem. The biggest thing I found out that took the most pain away was saddle position front to back. With moving the saddle back against all intuitive reason to move it forward when trying to take strain off the neck and get a slight bit more upright balanced me better on the bike and the core took over much of the support of my upper body. Taking the strain off arms and shoulders allows the neck to work a lot better.

    So for me I hated drop bars when I first went back and after figuring out drop bars can be higher than what most people would recommend. I then got the benefits of all the hand positions. The hoods are a most relaxed place now and I find myself in the drops more than half the time now. When I’m riding I take note of where most people have their hands and almost no one older is riding down there most are on the tops or hoods and I see a lot stretching like they are fighting getting upright where their body naturally wants to be. My one friend asked me how can I ride all day in the drops and I pointed out my drops are almost as high as his hoods and he gave me a puzzled look.

    Nothing wrong with drop bars but don’t be afraid to experiment with stems and height.
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    As others already said, you shouldn't have fit problems with the right stem, saddle, and bar adjustments.

    My advice is take a good test ride on cyclocross bikes. The brakes just don't work as well as road bikes. I got one for winter riding and occassional trails. It is fun and more useful for me than a mountain bike. But it doesn't stop like I'm used to. I'm going to try different brake pads.
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  9. #9
    A might bewildered... Dudelsack's Avatar
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    Senior Member avmech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
    For me, drops are for downhill and fighting winds. Learn to tuck your chin in to your chest and move your whole head back, do not tilt your head up from the chin, straining the neck. My PT taught me this.
    With 3 discs in my neck screwed up from a car wreck 10 years ago (3 others in my back), I also learned to do this. The worst thing I can do is tilt my head up the wrong way. Also doing stretches for the neck, including when riding, makes a world of difference.

    I also use the drops only for the reasons stated in the quoted post.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member bigbadwullf's Avatar
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    As with anything, start out S L O W! A few miles and and more miles as you get comfortable. I started back in the Fall of 2010. I rode like 2-3 miles the first time out. Last Summer I did an extremely hilly Metric Century(of which I could only do 32 miles) and by the end of the summer I did a full 'real' century. Don't just jump on the bike and ride 30 miles. Build up slowly.

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  12. #12
    tsl
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    After a sedentary 49 years followed by one year on a hybrid, I bought a road bike.

    I had neck and upper back pain for a while because my neck muscles never had to hold my big fat head up like that for so long. It took a month or two to get those muscles in shape.

    I get that still if I haven't been doing long rides and suddenly do 70 or 75 miles.

    As for the drops, it was excess pressure from excess middle that interfered with my breathing and kept me out of the drops for several years. I still find the hoods more comfortable, but I can also go miles and miles in the drops.

    I have a fitting every year as my strength and flexibility become greater. Over the years my bar height has dropped with every fitting. My stem is now "slammed" (soon to be flipped too) on two of my bikes (the ones with taller headtubes) and on the others I have as many spacers above the stem as below it. Along the way I've also switched from shorter 17° stems to longer 6° ones.

    My point being is that it takes time and miles and fitness (and desire) to get comfortable lower on the bars. There's no reason why you can't start out higher--and even stay there if that's what you like. I just hate headwinds and take every step (short of aerobars) to present less of myself to them.
    Last edited by tsl; 02-03-12 at 09:32 AM.
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  13. #13
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    GaryPitts,

    Lots of good advice above; I suspect that given the wide availability now of 'slightly relaxed geometry' road bikes (often referred to in marketing-speak as "endurance"), and of 'compact bars' (shorter reach/shallower drop), you can probably adapt. Lots of these kinds of bikes available now, at all price levels: Giant Defy; Spec. Roubaix/Secteur; Trek 'H2' fit, etc.

    FWIW, I'm 60, and while in very good overall aerobic shape for my age do have pretty severe osteoarthritis (spine, hands, knees etc.) coupled with mild scoliosis. Even so, I've averaged 6-7000 kms/year since taking up cycling in 2002; most of that has been on the 'road', and the last two years on a 'flat-bar road bike', which bars/controls apart is a road bike for all practical purposes (SRAM Apex group; Conti GP 4000s tires [25c]).

    But I've always wanted a 'proper' road bike, and have in fact twice purchased one only to return it after a few weeks ("I can't do this, etc.") -- last time in 2007. I have a very good/understanding LBS! I had pretty much concluded that I just couldn't "do" drop bars.

    However ... fast forward to late this past Fall ... I've pasted in below a relevant response I made to another thread. Both bikes fall into the 'endurance' category, and both have 'compact bars':

    ... I'll relate a very recent experience. I've been riding 'road' for some time now, thinking always that I couldn't ride a full-on road bike (i.e. with drops etc). Currently riding a Sirrus Comp (flat-bar road) w/upgrades. I'm 60, lots of physical issues (back, arthritis, etc.).

    Anyway, over the past two weekends I've had the chance to extensively test first a new Giant Defy Composite 1, and then a Specialized Roubaix SL2 -- both Ultegra. Did about a three-hour loop on each.

    Shopguys thought I'd go for the more relaxed, slightly less 'aggressive' Roubaix, no question ... "everybody like you does." Not at all an insult ... just an educated prediction on their part. I was prepared to say "I just can't do this" to both, but to prefer the Roubaix. We were both wrong!

    I loved the Defy. Riding position felt perfect/balanced out of the box (as did the Roubaix), but (can't believe I'm saying this) I much preferred the slightly more 'planted' feel of the Defy, greater 'road feel', stiffness, etc, all without being harsh.

    The Roubaix was great, no question, and certainly more 'plush' (can't avoid using that term, I guess) ... but I just 'liked' the slightly 'racier' feel of the Defy a little more (BTW, we were very careful to equalize for tire pressure etc. as much as possible), so much so that I am seriously considering getting one for next season.


  14. #14
    Senior Member mprelaw's Avatar
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    I got back on a road bike this summer after almost 30 years of being almost totally sedentary. I have a hybrid/comfort bike, but once I started riding it seriously, I realized that I was outgrowing it once my fitness improved (I had begun a walking program about 18 months previously, after being diagnosed with T-2 diabetes). I borrowed an older Schwinn Super LeTour off a friend, that was the right size for me. He didn't have enough, uh, "clearance" over the top tube.

    It took a couple of days, maybe a week to 10 days, for the muscles to adjust. Once I found that I could adjust to a road bike, I worked out a deal to own it. Road bikes give you 3 options for hand position--the top bar next to the stem, the brake hoods, and the drops. 8 months down the road, I never ride on the top bar any more. Just on the hoods and the drops. On long rides, I alternate between the hoods and the drops, just to change things around.

    The key is getting a bike that fits you. And, many bike shops have rental programs. Some will let you rent a bike for a period (up to a week or two) and will apply the rental fee to a purchase if you decide to buy. I would suggest that you look for a shop that has a program like that, before you drop 4 figures on a bike that you'll hate 3 months down the road.

  15. #15
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    started road riding at 59 after 16 years of MTB's. Of course I had neck problems but a few rides and that lessened greatly. A bit of core training and it improved-- high rise stem to bring the bars up to the saddle and after 40 miles or so and I had backache--More core training and a bike later and everything was fine. My problem was I was too tight in the body so a longer laid out stretched position on the new bike with the bars 4" below the saddle and I was fine.

    Back and neck problems will need some adjusting for you but you may even be one like me that found that a road bike suits me better
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  16. #16
    Senior Member teachme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaryPitts View Post
    I'm thinking stongly about getting a CX bike to use as a road hybrid with drop bars if you will. Not quite a year ago when I got my hybrid, my first bike, I had a heck of a time with neck pain after moderately long rides. I ended up putting a stem riser on which fixed things up nicely and neck pain is no longer an issue. So, I'm wondering if getting into the drops is going to cause this problem all over again. I know no one can speak for me and my particular scenario, but I'm wondering if anyone else out there went to their first drop bar bike after 50+ and have any pro or con experiences to share. I'm thinking about dropping a couple of grand on this thing and I'd hate to get something I couldn't ride but for 20 miles without pain
    If you are in normal health; 3 factors (maybe more) enter the equation of eliminating neck pain in the drops:
    1. Proper bike fit
    2. Proper rider weight
    3. Proper core strength
    If any of these conditions are less than ideal; you have something to work on.
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  17. #17
    Senior Member GaryPitts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StanSeven View Post
    The brakes just don't work as well as road bikes. I got one for winter riding and occassional trails. It is fun and more useful for me than a mountain bike. But it doesn't stop like I'm used to. I'm going to try different brake pads.
    This one has disc brakes and I suspect it will stop like a boss
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  18. #18
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
    Yes. But yoga, spin class with the bars lower than the saddle, lots of riding, rotating off your butt into a flat back position, and the result is my bars keep getting lower and I do ride in the drops comfortably.

    It takes time and intention. You learn alot about your fit and fitness along the way. I think the benefits carry over into general health and posture.

    If you come from a background of virtually no road bike riding for 40 years it will take time, like years.

    That was my experience.
    My experience also.

    I was away from cycling for 30 years. I started cycling again with a Hybrid. I liked the bike, but wanted better performance within 6 months. I went to a professional fitter and purchased a Cyclocross bike. Best thing I could have done. The Cyclocross bike was set up for endurance and I was able to increase my time on the bike from two hours/day to twelve hours/day in a year. I've put 15,000 miles on my Cyclocross bike in 5 years. It's still my favorite bike.
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  19. #19
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by badger1 View Post
    GaryPitts,



    I loved the Defy. Riding position felt perfect/balanced out of the box (as did the Roubaix), but (can't believe I'm saying this) I much preferred the slightly more 'planted' feel of the Defy, greater 'road feel', stiffness, etc, all without being harsh.

    The Roubaix was great, no question, and certainly more 'plush' (can't avoid using that term, I guess) ... but I just 'liked' the slightly 'racier' feel of the Defy a little more (BTW, we were very careful to equalize for tire pressure etc. as much as possible), so much so that I am seriously considering getting one for next season.

    [/B]
    This is exactly what I found with my second road bike. First one was just a "Starter" bike in an OCR3 and was a comfort frame and was set up up to conform to an older riders style. The two bikes Badger1 mentioned are two very good examples of very good bikes to think about. Get test rides in and compare the two styles. The Roubaix is one of the favourites on this forum and the defy is a good range to start with on the more competitive feel.

    I know I am thinking of a CX for the offroad trails we have round here- but if you are thinking road riding---Then go road.
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  20. #20
    Senior Member teachme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
    My experience also.

    I was away from cycling for 30 years. I started cycling again with a Hybrid. I liked the bike, but wanted better performance within 6 months. I went to a professional fitter and purchased a Cyclocross bike. Best thing I could have done. The Cyclocross bike was set up for endurance and I was able to increase my time on the bike from two hours/day to twelve hours/day in a year. I've put 15,000 miles on my Cyclocross bike in 5 years. It's still my favorite bike.
    You ride your bike for 12 hours a day?
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    Senior Member Looigi's Avatar
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    Tops of my bars are 10cm below the top of my saddle and I ride in the drops at length. Found that this is the best setup for my back. For me, lower is better. May not work for everybody though.

  22. #22
    Carpe Velo Yo Spiff's Avatar
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    I've been preferring a road bike my whole life, though having just turned 50 last year, I'm one of the youngsters in this group. I have the bars about an inch below the saddle. I'm not comfortable in the drops at all, but I think that's my spare tire being in the way. Riding on the hoods feels perfect. I suppose if you've been used to a more upright bike, it may take some adjustment and getting used to.
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  23. #23
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teachme View Post
    You ride your bike for 12 hours a day?
    144 miles. Did that just once.

    10 wheels rides his bike 12 hours a day ;-).
    Last edited by Barrettscv; 02-03-12 at 02:08 PM.
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  24. #24
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
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    I started riding road bikes at 64. I'm now 65 and have purchased a second road bike as an upgrade to the first. Coming from a hybrid, I had the same issue as you do, but exercising the neck muscles helped strengthen them to the point where I can do a century and not be bothered by it. It will take some time and you will most likely have some discomfort or even mild pain. Don't give up on it and keep riding. The more you ride, the better it gets.
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  25. #25
    Senior Member teachme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
    144 miles. Did that just once.

    10 wheels rides his bike 12 hours a day ;-).
    LOL! I'm still trying to get my first century in. Longest ride so far was 75 miles in 5 1/2 hrs.
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