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Old 04-11-12, 04:39 PM   #1
PatekCalatrava
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What Should I expect to pay?

Hi. I am a "newbie", having ridden a lot as a teenager into my early 20's. Now at age 59, I am contemplating a new bike and a new morning regimen of riding. Concerning the bike to buy, what would I expect to pay for a bike with a good frame, Shimano Ultegra D12 electronic drivetrain, carbon fiber framework, FSA brakes,(front and rear)Ksyrium wheels, Ritchy pro bar and stem? I have doing some research but there is such an abundance of information, some of it obviously planted by interested parties, that it is hard to know what such a combination should cost. Any info would be appreciated. We are talking about a new bike. Thanks.
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Old 04-11-12, 05:19 PM   #2
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I will be the first to venture a guess. With the electronic shifters and higher quality wheels than comes normal I would guess you are in the $6000.00 range.

No personal attacks please, this is just a guess. Thanks
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Old 04-11-12, 05:34 PM   #3
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Someone is going to have to say it, and because there's nothing good on TV I guess I have to do it.

Why would you want a pro level bike if you're a noob?

You risk being branded as a poseur riding a dentist's bike (apologies to the dentists) at any group ride.

Your bike will resent you, especially if you're more than 25 pounds overweight.

If you don't get into cycling, it will be hard to resell.

Then again, if you're the wealthy 1%.....
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Old 04-11-12, 05:48 PM   #4
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First, welcome.

If you're buying at a local shop I would expect to pay around $4000+. You can get Ultegra Di2 equipped bike for less on-line, but not much, and it might not meet all of your specifications.
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Old 04-11-12, 05:51 PM   #5
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Someone is going to have to say it, and because there's nothing good on TV I guess I have to do it.

Why would you want a pro level bike if you're a noob?

You risk being branded as a poseur riding a dentist's bike (apologies to the dentists) at any group ride.

Your bike will resent you, especially if you're more than 25 pounds overweight.

If you don't get into cycling, it will be hard to resell.

Then again, if you're the wealthy 1%.....
Why would you possibly care what he spends on a bike? Give him a break.
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Old 04-11-12, 06:10 PM   #6
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Why would you possibly care what he spends on a bike? Give him a break.
Why would you care if I cared what he spends on a bike?
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Old 04-11-12, 06:25 PM   #7
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Yikes. I did not realize this was a pro bike. It did not occur to me that a better bike would present problems. I better damn well use it after I get it. The truth is, I have been riding motorcycles for years. I have ridden extensively in different parts of the world including the Alps, and Alaska and the Yukon. I have always felt vaguely guilty passing bicycles...the riders are after all getting in better shape while I am just coursing along letting the engine do the hard work. I did some research into what bike to buy and those components were highly rated, so I figured at my age, what the hell, get a good bike because if I don't, I will always think about a better bike and end up buying two and spending more money. I hope I am not making a mistake. I must say the logic escapes me, though. Why would a better bike be unsuited to a new rider? If I ride a lot, I will grow into the bike very quickly. If I don't ride it, then it makes no difference at all what bike I get. I still don't understand why a better bike would be a negative for any reason.
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Old 04-11-12, 06:28 PM   #8
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After careful consideration I withdraw my previous comment. I say go for it. I'm just jealous and a bit out of sorts that I didn't ride today.
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Old 04-11-12, 06:45 PM   #9
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I just don't bend that far over to ride far any more..
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Old 04-11-12, 06:51 PM   #10
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Be aware that no matter what quality bike you get, there is always, always a better one, likely riding in front of you.

However, one has to start somewhere, and I would sure like to be able (to afford) to start where you are planning to start.

Also, be aware that one can be perfectly happy on a $2,000 bike, and it won't be a whole lot different than a $4-6,000 bike, especially for a newbie. In any event, GO FOR IT!! And, mainly, have fun.
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Old 04-11-12, 07:06 PM   #11
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When it comes to bicycles, more expensive is not always better, but more likely lighter. Lighter is not always the most durable. If you have a few pounds to drop, start with a more durable bike and save weight by dropping some off the engine. Best bet is to go to your local bike shop (LBS), talk with them and ride some bikes. I think you'll find a couple of grand can get you a really nice bike.
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Old 04-11-12, 07:15 PM   #12
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Lighter is not always the most durable.
Heavier is not always the most durable either.

Get the cool bike and go ride it.
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Old 04-11-12, 07:18 PM   #13
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Hey, I ride a pro level bike and can go off the back as well as anyone. But, I look good doing it so I'm cool. lol
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Old 04-11-12, 07:30 PM   #14
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I'll throw my 2 cents in. At the price point you are considering you could buy some of the most sought after vintage bikes and ride what a lot of cycling aficionados consider cycling art. Look up Constructeur, Alex Singer, Rene Hearse and oogle some truly beautiful bikes. Might as well look at Cinelli, Eisentraut, Behringer.

Also check out hilarystone.com
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Old 04-11-12, 07:32 PM   #15
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I would never discourage somebody from buying a high end bicycle if their budget allows. I suspect that although many may not derive the ultimate performance that the bicycle can deliver, having a bicycle that evokes a passion will get ridden more often and for greater distance.

My bicycle is better than I need and many can get better performance from much less expensive bicycles than I can obtain from mine. I am passionate about riding it, however. Although it is a better bicycle than I need, I am strongly considering Ultegra Di2. I saw a new Specialized Roubaix SL3 Pro frame go for about $1300 on Ebay. My Roubaix Expert is a 2010 SL2. The weight difference is only 100 grams, and I could never justify the upgrade. I surely was tempted. I am saving enough for my retirement and although I would consider it extravagant, I have spent more on other things that have provided less pleasure than a new frame built with Di2. I could have probably build the bicycle for about $4000 if I re-used my Roval Fusee SL wheels. As an engineer practicality overcame my emotions. I may wait until the 2013 models come out and see whet kind of a discount I can get on a 2012 Roubaix Pro with Di2. My emotions may eventually win.
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Old 04-11-12, 07:34 PM   #16
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White Gold rims will be kinda heavy to match your watch.
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Old 04-11-12, 07:39 PM   #17
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Price doesn't matter in the OP's situation.

These do:

Friendly Bike Shop
Perfect fit to the bike.
The Color.

Get one and have fun.
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Old 04-11-12, 07:39 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by PatekCalatrava View Post
Yikes. I did not realize this was a pro bike. It did not occur to me that a better bike would present problems. I better damn well use it after I get it. The truth is, I have been riding motorcycles for years. I have ridden extensively in different parts of the world including the Alps, and Alaska and the Yukon. I have always felt vaguely guilty passing bicycles...the riders are after all getting in better shape while I am just coursing along letting the engine do the hard work. I did some research into what bike to buy and those components were highly rated, so I figured at my age, what the hell, get a good bike because if I don't, I will always think about a better bike and end up buying two and spending more money. I hope I am not making a mistake. I must say the logic escapes me, though. Why would a better bike be unsuited to a new rider? If I ride a lot, I will grow into the bike very quickly. If I don't ride it, then it makes no difference at all what bike I get. I still don't understand why a better bike would be a negative for any reason.
Buy whatever you like. Higher end road bikes are lighter, easier to pedal, and the components work well. They are aimed at racing or going fast. You may have to lean over more than you want. You also may need to learn about small saddles and bike shorts. But seats and stems and handlebars can be changed. They are also bumpier. Often favoring light weight over being durable. The wheels and tires will not be up to big holes or bumps. However, myself going from decades of motorcycling, to high end bicycles, I was used to scanning the ground and looking at traffic far ahead. I was used to the speed of motorcycles and dirt bikes. It made going around holes and riding in traffic extremely easy. Almost too easy. One only needs to learn the limits of more fragile tires and wheels. And not being able to absorb big bumps like a motorcycle. Also the braking is limited by the small tires. Very easy to learn, after going 50mph down foot paths in the woods. Probably much easier for you than any non motorcyclist due to the speed. Stopping fast on 23mm tires with 120 lbs in them is nothing like a motorcycle. NOTHING!
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Old 04-11-12, 07:49 PM   #19
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If you are reasonably mechanically proficient, $2799.95 seems about right.

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...ltegra_di2.htm

I would be very surprised if you could walk out the door of your LBS with a CF frame, Di2, Ksyrium wheels, etc. for less than $6000.

I bought a (much less expensive) BD bike, and was delighted. I might be more hesitant to buy cutting edge technology that way. On the other hand, Di2 seems like it's more inherently self-adjusting than mechanical shifters and derailleurs.

Did you maintain your own motorcycles?
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Old 04-11-12, 07:50 PM   #20
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You work hard for your money. Spend it how you like. If it's not your wife or financial planner coaxing you to buy less expensive, let it fall on deaf ears my friend.
What ever you decide, ride it, report it and post photos here!!!
Good luck!!!
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Old 04-11-12, 08:24 PM   #21
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A Bianchi Infinito Ultegra Di2 (in celeste -- gorgeous) or Sempre Ultegra Di2 are in the $5k range. Very nice. If you're one of those guys who knows they are really going to like something, then I'd say go for it. If your garage is full of spendy items you only used once or twice, then maybe you should think twice about spending $5k to start, but it's your money. If you like the sport, I don't see waiting 5 or 10 years to get a nice bike -- go for it while you're (relatively) young.
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Old 04-11-12, 08:35 PM   #22
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PatekCalatrava,

I am a long time motorcyclist having owned Guzzi, Ducati, Norton, Triumph, Honda & Kawasikis. I am sure that you have seen newbies to motorcycling that went right out and bought a 1800 Gold Wing or a Hayabusa as their first bike. These are the best or near the best bikes in their particular niches, so they must be the ones for a rookie to buy, right? The result is usually a lot of problems, disillusionment and sometimes major accidents. A lot of these guys would have been better off buying something like a GS550 or a 650 Nighthawk and possibly used. Now major accidents are much less common with newbs on bicycles but adjustment problems are.

Like with motorcycles you need some seat time. If you haven't spent a lot of time on a bicycle before your muscles will settle in and develop in the ways that bicycling demands. Yes there is a learning curve for the level of cycling that the kind of bike you are looking at is made for.

Do you want to go touring, race, club rides, casual rides or just exercise. It's sort of the same difference between touring, cafe, musclebikes, motocross, trials, or cruiser motorcycles.

Personally I would decide what kind of bicycling you are wanting to do and then head for the local bike shop. Personally I would even consider a good used bike. Explain what you want to do to the local bike shop owner and see what he shows you. Don't blow your wad on your first bike. Just get a good serviceable starter bike that matches what you want to do. Have the bike shop fit the bike to you. This is very important as a badly fit bike can cause you a lot of needless problems and will not be very enjoyable.

After you have a quality starter bike then try to use it up. Find your local bike club and go on some rides with them. At first they will probably drop you like a GSXR1100 leaving a CB360. Still you should be able to find someone who will ride with you. Look at the bikes that some of the riders have. As with motorcycles once the owners get to know you, you can probably bum some rides on some of the high end bikes. The more you learn the more your ideas about what you want will change!

I would ride the first bike for at least a year before you go hunting for your dream bike.

In short think about how you would instruct a novice motorcyclist about getting into cycling and then take your own advice with your bicycle.

Lastly, when you get ready to upgrade the local bike shop where you bought the bicycle should give you a large percentage of what you spent as a trade-in. While bicycles do depreciate they don't do it on the same rate as motor vehicles. Many shops will give you even more trade-in if you bought the original bike at their store so save your receipt.

By all means come back here as you progress and ask questions. There are a lot of folks in this forum who have spent a lot of years peddling down roads and trails.

Last edited by Mort Canard; 04-11-12 at 08:43 PM.
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Old 04-11-12, 08:42 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatekCalatrava View Post
I did some research into what bike to buy and those components were highly rated, so I figured at my age, what the hell, get a good bike because if I don't, I will always think about a better bike and end up buying two and spending more money. I hope I am not making a mistake.
Actually I think it is a mistake to think you can get your "bike for life" on the first try. You may benefit from getting beginner's bike and then graduating to better bike after a while. Your fitness, flexibility and riding style will evolve and the bike may have to be changed to accomodate that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
Buy whatever you like.
He doesn't know what he likes.
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Old 04-11-12, 08:59 PM   #24
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That's a pretty detailed list of specifications indicating you must have done a fair amount of research. Kind of surprising you didn't stumble across any pricing information during all that research. If you are really prepared to spend that kind of $ on a starter bike, you should go to a high end bike shop and let them show you what they have. I'm sure they'll be happy to help you. Happy riding.
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Old 04-11-12, 10:04 PM   #25
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I started riding again at age 54 and bought my first road bike since college at age 57. I spent nearly $6K on a custom fitted ti frame with an ultegra triple. In the 5 years I've owned the bike I've ridden over 10k miles on it. I really enjoy riding the bike. It was well worth the money I spent on it. You can't take it with you. If the Di2 was available 5 years ago I might have splurged the price difference for the electronic shifters. Heck I might even upgrade my bike to one this year or next. You might as well spend it on something you enjoy that will keep you fit than give it to the doctors later.
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