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Old 05-04-12, 03:02 PM   #1
DnvrFox
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OT: Attention Stapfam and others across the pond on the potion of the island called

England

My wife does aquareobics with a lady from your part of the world who makes two claims:

1. Folks over 70 can not drive in England

2, In order to fly in an airplane, folks (over 70??) need a medical clearance, and her mother was denied one to fly to the big island on which I live because she had varicose veins.

True?
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Old 05-04-12, 03:12 PM   #2
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Not true.
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Old 05-04-12, 03:15 PM   #3
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To elaborate, one's driving licence expires at 70 and must be renewed every three years thereafter. But renewal is routine unless the applicant has some medical condition that would disqualify them from driving.
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Old 05-04-12, 03:21 PM   #4
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To elaborate, one's driving licence expires at 70 and must be renewed every three years thereafter. But renewal is routine unless the applicant has some medical condition that would disqualify them from driving.
This right but at 65 and 50,000miles a year for the past 40 years- I don't drive unless I have to.

On the over 70's Flying- Not come across this except for Holiday Insurance for travel. I have had a Bypass and Cancer. Both around 10 years ago and both clear now. But holiday insurance jumped from 32 last year to 205 this year. Just due to my Medical History and the fact that I am over 65.
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Old 05-04-12, 08:38 PM   #5
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Thank God he didn't mention the Death Panels ...
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Old 05-04-12, 08:42 PM   #6
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Thank God he didn't mention the Death Panels ...
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Old 05-04-12, 09:07 PM   #7
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A Google shows that airlines in England can seemingly easily stop folks with certain conditions from flying.
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Old 05-05-12, 01:54 AM   #8
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A Google shows that airlines in England can seemingly easily stop folks with certain conditions from flying.
Well, of course they can. The main issue is whether a passenger has a pre-existing condition that could be exacerbated by flying and endanger the safety of the flight or the other passengers. And obviously airlines aren't keen on flying someone who is quite likely to experience a medical emergency and cause them to divert the flight.

But this isn't an age restriction. It will happen more with the very elderly because they are more likely to suffer from such conditions. But my mother, for example, took her last flight when she was 86, iirc.

Edit: KLM require a medical certificate from potential passengers who
  • Passengers who have a medical condition that could result in a life-threatening situation or could require the provision of exceptional medical care for their safety during the flight.
I'd be mildly surprised if all airlines didn't have some similar policy.

Last edited by chasm54; 05-05-12 at 02:09 AM.
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Old 05-05-12, 05:28 AM   #9
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Well, of course they can. The main issue is whether a passenger has a pre-existing condition that could be exacerbated by flying and endanger the safety of the flight or the other passengers. And obviously airlines aren't keen on flying someone who is quite likely to experience a medical emergency and cause them to divert the flight.

But this isn't an age restriction. It will happen more with the very elderly because they are more likely to suffer from such conditions. But my mother, for example, took her last flight when she was 86, iirc.

Edit: KLM require a medical certificate from potential passengers who
  • Passengers who have a medical condition that could result in a life-threatening situation or could require the provision of exceptional medical care for their safety during the flight.
I'd be mildly surprised if all airlines didn't have some similar policy.
As long as the airlines don't have strict requirements that travelers over 70 bring a medical release, such policies will only have an effect if you tell them you have such a limitation. But, if you are worried about it, they should be too.
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Old 05-05-12, 06:01 AM   #10
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Apparently not just the UK : >>>

:-)
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Old 05-05-12, 06:49 AM   #11
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Apparently not just the UK : >>>

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Old 05-05-12, 08:04 AM   #12
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Well, of course they can. The main issue is whether a passenger has a pre-existing condition that could be exacerbated by flying and endanger the safety of the flight or the other passengers. And obviously airlines aren't keen on flying someone who is quite likely to experience a medical emergency and cause them to divert the flight.

But this isn't an age restriction. It will happen more with the very elderly because they are more likely to suffer from such conditions. But my mother, for example, took her last flight when she was 86, iirc.

Edit: KLM require a medical certificate from potential passengers who
  • Passengers who have a medical condition that could result in a life-threatening situation or could require the provision of exceptional medical care for their safety during the flight.
I'd be mildly surprised if all airlines didn't have some similar policy.
This gets a bit sticky when, for example, my son, who is quadraplegic, travels on airplanes. The US of A has regulations:

"Carriers may not refuse transportation on the basis of disability. By law, US air carriers must comply with highly detailed regulations that affect people with disabilities. These do not cover foreign carriers serving the United States." Also note the Air Carrier Access Act.

http://www.disabilitytravel.com/airl...arrier_act.htm

My son travels tens of thousands of miles per year on US airlines - and it would be a travesty if he got to England and could not come home. Without federal regulations, so much is left to the interpretation of the airlines.

Obviously a sensitive subject for me.
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Old 05-05-12, 09:51 AM   #13
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My son travels tens of thousands of miles per year on US airlines - and it would be a travesty if he got to England and could not come home. Without federal regulations, so much is left to the interpretation of the airlines.

Obviously a sensitive subject for me.
This should not be a problem. The UK has an Equalities Act which has replaced, and incorporates the provisions of, the old Disability Discrimination Legislation. UK airlines (and others flying into and out of the UK) routinely carry people with disabilities. Obviously it is important to make the airline aware of the passenger's needs at the time of booking, but you will know much more about that than I.

A lot of effort has been made in recent years to ensure that service providers do not treat people with disabilities as "ill". I'd be surprised if your son met with any obstructiveness.
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Old 05-06-12, 06:03 PM   #14
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1 Over 70 Driving Licence application procedure http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring...nce/DG_4022086
A medical check is only needed to drive a heavy vehicle like a lorry or bus. The normal licence is only valid for 3 years.

2. We fly to the UK each year and we are in our 70s and have never been asked about our health. The airlines know our age because we all have to provide this information since 9/11
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Old 05-06-12, 06:53 PM   #15
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1 Over 70 Driving Licence application procedure http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring...nce/DG_4022086
A medical check is only needed to drive a heavy vehicle like a lorry or bus. The normal licence is only valid for 3 years.

2. We fly to the UK each year and we are in our 70s and have never been asked about our health. The airlines know our age because we all have to provide this information since 9/11
Thanks, all. My wife's friend seems very confused.
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