Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 48
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    My Bikes
    2011 Trek Madone 3.1, 2009 Trek 7.3FX
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Help With Prostate Cancer Treatment

    I was diagnosed 4 years ago at age 60 with a slow growing cancer in my prostate. Knowing the risks attached to these treatments, I opted for watchful waiting. My PSA scores have unfortunately been increasing recently, as have my urination issues. Last month my oncologist advised that the nodule on my prostate has increased in size, and he recommended that I get treatment this year. After a lot of research, I am leaning towards brachytherapy (radioactive seed implantation)....but. The oncologist advised that my butt would be too sore to ride my bike for awhile. Any comments or guidance? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,807
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Only my very best wishes and hope for success.
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    My Bikes
    2011 Trek Madone 3.1, 2009 Trek 7.3FX
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Senior Member love2pedal.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    My Bikes
    Look 586, Condor Baracchi, Litespeed
    Posts
    730
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The good news for you is that the doctor thinks the cancer is still contained within the prostate.

    I am pretty certain about one thing, the time off the bike is a lot less with brachytherapy then with removing the prostate. I had my prostate removed two years ago and was told to not ride for 4 weeks.

    If the time off the bike really is a concern, I think there are some external beam radiation therapies that shouldn't affect your time off the bike like brachytherapy.

    Good luck and wishing you a lifetime of low PSA numbers.

  5. #5
    Senior Member zonatandem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    My Bikes
    ariZona carbon fiber tandem & single
    Posts
    9,941
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Had seed implants about 5 years ago.
    Works just as advertised!
    In/out of hospital in half-a-day.
    Off the bike for about 4 weeks.
    Backside was, as my wife described: "beautiful technicolor!"
    Attempted to get on bike several times, butt was just a bit too tender.
    Finally adjusted saddle tilt jus a bit and been riding ever since.
    Get 'er done!
    Pedal on!
    Rudy/zonatandem

  6. #6
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
    My Bikes
    Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
    Posts
    19,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That watchful waiting is not a good treatment for PCa. Whatever you do decide on treatment- get it done soon.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


    Spike Milligan

  7. #7
    tly
    tly is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NW Missouri
    My Bikes
    Cannondale T700 Specialized Hardrock Comp Disc
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Had mine removed October 7, 2011. Off bike two weeks before surgery and 8 weeks after. Butt soreness during post surgery recovery but getting on the bike the exact day I was cleared to do so actually helped and have been riding ever since with no issues. I chose removal over other options and have no regrets. Surgery with Da Vinci method was a breeze.
    I don't want a pickle......
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Comp Disc
    2006 Specialized Allez Elite

  8. #8
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Pensacola, Florida
    My Bikes
    CAAD 10 4
    Posts
    6,565
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Best of luck in which ever mans of treatment you choose. You'll be in my prayers, adding you to the prayer board this morning.

    Bill

  9. #9
    Cycling Anarchist Trsnrtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,013
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Radiation and hormone therapy are probably the only way that you will stay on the bike but neither of those is a picnic, either. External beam radiation can carry severe side effects, though rare. Unluckily, my highly aggressive cancer came back 6 years after a radical prostatectomy, necessitating external radiation and hormone therapy. I now have a damaged rectum that has been repaired and am having cystoscopy in a couple weeks to determine if I also have radiation/scar damage to my bladder. I'm the poster boy for the worst case scenario.

    If my doc told me that I could have brachytherapy and I'd only be off the bike 4 weeks, I'd go for it. Your sex life will be better and you'll have way less complications. Count your lucky stars and do it. I was never offered brachytherapy due to a 5 element in my Gleason score, a small prostate, and the non-containment of the disease.

    Good luck!
    Dennis T

  10. #10
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Indianapolis
    My Bikes
    1990 Trek 1500; 2006 Gary Fisher Marlin; 2011 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 105; 2012 Catrike Trail
    Posts
    4,081
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm following this thread with interest, as my father had prostate cancer late in life (successfully treated with radioactive pellet implants), and my doctor says mine is "prominent," prompting us to keep a close watch on it and my PSA levels at each annual physical. So far, so good, with only modest urinary issues, barely bad enough to even be called a nuisance. But it's good to be forearmed with info, should the worst occur.

    Denny, I had no idea about your issues. I'm sorry to hear them, and I wish you nothing but the best from here on out.
    Craig in Indy

  11. #11
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    My Bikes
    2012 Colnago Ace road bike, 2010 Giant Cypress hybrid
    Posts
    3,145
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Trsnrtr View Post
    Radiation and hormone therapy are probably the only way that you will stay on the bike but neither of those is a picnic, either. External beam radiation can carry severe side effects, though rare. Unluckily, my highly aggressive cancer came back 6 years after a radical prostatectomy, necessitating external radiation and hormone therapy. I now have a damaged rectum that has been repaired and am having cystoscopy in a couple weeks to determine if I also have radiation/scar damage to my bladder. I'm the poster boy for the worst case scenario.

    If my doc told me that I could have brachytherapy and I'd only be off the bike 4 weeks, I'd go for it. Your sex life will be better and you'll have way less complications. Count your lucky stars and do it. I was never offered brachytherapy due to a 5 element in my Gleason score, a small prostate, and the non-containment of the disease.

    Good luck!

    I also had the radiation and hormone therapy (2008) but it was augmented with brachytherapy (77 isotopes). I opted for the orthoscopic surgery but was told it wasn't an option because of my leukemia. So far, I have not had any major issues from the radiation therapy. A new option is Cyber Knife, which came out after my treatments were completed. There are a lot of treatments available for prostate cancer, none of which should be influenced by time off the bike. Treatment should be determined by the severity of the cancer and your your ability to handle the treatment. Do lots of your own research and determine which treatment is right for you.
    HCFR Cycling Team
    Ride Safe ... Ride Hard ... Ride Daily

    2012 Colnago Ace
    2010 Giant Cypress


  12. #12
    Senior Member late's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    8,246
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by stapfam View Post

    That watchful waiting is not a good treatment for PCa. Whatever you do decide on treatment- get it done soon.
    I disagree.

    I opted for that, and my numbers went down.

    Even if they didn't, most prostate tumors grow so slow something else is going to
    kill you first.

    There's no rush, and lots of reasons to wait.
    We are as gods, we might as well get good at it.
    Stewart Brand

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    279
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by late View Post
    I disagree.

    I opted for that, and my numbers went down.

    Even if they didn't, most prostate tumors grow so slow something else is going to
    kill you first.

    There's no rush, and lots of reasons to wait.

    I agree. AND, it's not called watchful waiting anymore; it's called active surveillance. Time is your friend in the right conditions. Who knows where medical science will be in another 3 to 4 years. I've been on active surveillance for the last four years and I thank my lucky stars every day.

    Matt

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    My Bikes
    2011 Trek Madone 3.1, 2009 Trek 7.3FX
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks so much everyone. Time off the bike, as love2pedal and John V said, shouldn't be the issue. I agree. 4 or 5 weeks is perfectly acceptable to me when it may result in many more years of cycling (and reading this forum). Stapfam, I noticed this change (from 'watchful' to 'active') a couple of years ago. I have been actively surveilled....PSA tests (I will never enjoy these) every 3 months, and the old finger test (I enjoy these even less) every 6 months. I have done a lot of research on treatments, looking for the least invasive procedure with the best outcomes. I am still a fan of brachytherapy at this point. Again...thanks for your comments and prayers.

  15. #15
    Cycling Anarchist Trsnrtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,013
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by late View Post
    I disagree.

    I opted for that, and my numbers went down.

    Even if they didn't, most prostate tumors grow so slow something else is going to
    kill you first.

    There's no rush, and lots of reasons to wait.
    That's not totally true. Not all prostate cancers are the same; some are aggressive and watchful waiting could be deadly. If your doctor says it's time and you don't agree, then you better be sure you get a second opinion before totally disregarding the doctor's advice.

    Mine was very aggressive and had already escaped the capsule and taken out my semen ducts. Watchful waiting would have been the most ignorant thing that I could have done. By the way, I was 51 when my cancer was found and 57 when it returned.

    Remember what I said earlier about the cancer having spread beyond the prostate? Even after a prostatectomy and a wide margin removal, it still returned and was found to be growing like a runaway freight train.

    I agree with watchful waiting or active surveillance or whatever sanitized name wants to call it as long as it's based on good medical advice, but it certainly is not a good strategy in all cases.
    Last edited by Trsnrtr; 05-17-12 at 08:38 PM.
    Dennis T

  16. #16
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
    My Bikes
    Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
    Posts
    19,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by late View Post
    I disagree.

    I opted for that, and my numbers went down.

    Even if they didn't, most prostate tumors grow so slow something else is going to
    kill you first.

    There's no rush, and lots of reasons to wait.

    My Diary shows Doc gave a Rectal as I was of that age in January 2001. No symptoms what so ever except he found the prostate was enlarged. PSA count came back as 16 and that is high. Biopsy in March and all 6 samples showed Cancer. Radical Prostatectomy in June and it was 5 years later that I was I was declared clear. I was also given the reason for in that 5 years having a PSA test every 3 months. From March to the OP I had lots of tests and no adverse signs to stop the operation but the Examination on the prostate after showed the cancer was right through it and did not have long before it would have spread. Within a few weeks it would have spread tp other parts of the body.

    Now if the initial PSA test is low and further tests do not show growth then no treatment is required- but as soon as it is determined there is a problem and a Biopsy shows that the problem is Acute then Action has to be taken Quickly. Biopsy is the only way to confirm severity and if any sign of cancer is found then you do not have long before it will spread through and from the prostate. But PSA count is just an indicator that there could be a problem. I worked with someone that had a PSA count of 27. Biopsy every 6 months and no cancer has been found and this has been going on for the last 15 years. He is now 75 and decided not to have any more biopsy's

    Prostate Cancer Kills and it is not long that it develops from a Problem to a life threatening condition. Watch and See is not a treatment that provides a cure. And like Trsnrtr-I was only 54 when I had the problem. it is not just an old mans disease.
    Last edited by stapfam; 05-18-12 at 12:30 AM.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


    Spike Milligan

  17. #17
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    My Bikes
    2012 Colnago Ace road bike, 2010 Giant Cypress hybrid
    Posts
    3,145
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We had a similar thread going around the 50+ forum several months ago, and some of the responses really shocked me. It makes me really wonder just how many men really understand, or want to understand, prostate cancer and the methods used to diagnose it. I always hear that they hate taking a PSA test. It's only a blood test! I would venture to say that it's the test results and not the method of testing, that scares most men.

    An elevated PSA is not an indication or diagnosis of prostate cancer, nor will it ever be. It only indicates that your prostate is releasing more antigens than what is considered normal and your PSA can be elevated for several different reasons. A digital exam only serves to determine if the prostate is normal in size and consistency (deformities or hard spots). A wait and see type of treatment is usually recommended for elevated PSA if it is the first time that the PSA is found to be high. However, a second test is normally scheduled in 6-12 months to check for the PSA Velocity to indicate whether further testing is required. The PSA Velocity is the time it takes for the levels to rise from test A to test B. The higher the rise and the shorter the time and you most likely have a problem. My PSA rose from 2.4 to 4.6 in one year and to 6.2 three months later. This definitely indicated immediate attention and a biopsy.

    Granted, prostate biopsies are not fun and can have severe complications, but not having one done, if needed, can quickly turn fatal. Lots of lymph nodes in the area around the prostate and that's one cancer I definitely don't want to deal with. Depending on the results of the biopsy (Gleason Score), is when you should start considering the type of treatment that is best for you. Cancers with low Gleason Scores respond well to brachytherapy and in many cases, that's all that is required. Personally, I would never consider brachytherapy, alone, with a Gleason Score of 6 or higher (max is 10, mine was 8.8). I have several friends that have had the orthoscopic surgery with low Gleason Scores, just to decrease the chances of it returning. Also consider the number of lanced that will be used (6 or 12). The more lances that are used, the greater the risk of complications, but the results are twice as accurate.

    Having spent over 20 years in the medical field, understanding prostate cancer (and my leukemia) was easy for me. Might I suggest to those that are not 100% sure about prostate cancer, that you find a board certified urologist and let them explain it to you. Just don't leave their office until you are 100% sure you understand all that was covered. And don't be afraid to ask questions, especially if you are not certain of the answer. The more you know, the less the fear.
    HCFR Cycling Team
    Ride Safe ... Ride Hard ... Ride Daily

    2012 Colnago Ace
    2010 Giant Cypress


  18. #18
    Cycling Anarchist Trsnrtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,013
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good info, John. Understanding what is going on is vital. One size (treatment) does not fit all in prostate cancer.
    Dennis T

  19. #19
    His Brain is Gone! Tom Bombadil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Paoli, Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    RANS Stratus, Bridgestone CB-1, Trek 7600, Sun EZ-Rider AX, Fuji Absolute 1.0, Cayne Rambler 3
    Posts
    9,980
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L'Amour

    There are two types of road bikers: bikers who are faster than me, and me. Bruce Cameron - Denver Post

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    My Bikes
    2011 Trek Madone 3.1, 2009 Trek 7.3FX
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can't understand this Tom. It was my PSA test that first alerted my family doctor that I needed to have a biopsy. Yes, there are risks in having a biopsy, but if I didn't have one, my cancer may have gone untreated....and may have subsequently spread. BTW, I have defintely decided to have the brachytherapy treatment next November. Why November? Who wants to miss out on summer riding?

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    My Bikes
    2011 Trek Madone 3.1, 2009 Trek 7.3FX
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    John V., my Gleason Score is 6....

  22. #22
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Around now and then
    Posts
    20,807
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "“There is convincing evidence that the number of men who avoid dying of prostate cancer because of screening after 10 to 14 years is, at best, very small,”"

    What is "very small"????
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  23. #23
    tly
    tly is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NW Missouri
    My Bikes
    Cannondale T700 Specialized Hardrock Comp Disc
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    A peek at the future of Government controlled healthcare

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bombadil View Post
    What is the fastest growing age group in the US today? Baby Boomers. As a rule what age group does prostate cancer begin to develop? Baby Boomers. Welcome to the future of government controlled healthcare.

    PSA testing saved my life and I hope to live long enough to draw my SS and Medicare if it survives.

    Sorry folks but this really gets under my skin. Since my encounter with prostate cancer I have made it my mission to talk about it and encourage all guys my age to get their PSA tested.
    I don't want a pickle......
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Comp Disc
    2006 Specialized Allez Elite

  24. #24
    Senior Member John_V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    My Bikes
    2012 Colnago Ace road bike, 2010 Giant Cypress hybrid
    Posts
    3,145
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bombadil View Post

    I started to read this article and just couldn't go any further than the second paragraph:

    "The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force gave the prostate-specific antigen test a grade of D, saying that the risks of population-wide screening outweigh the benefits."

    These guys have either got to be complete morons or have been seriously lobbied by the insurance companies. Someone please explain to me the risks of a simple blood test which is normally done during an annual physical, anyway. That statement definitely sounds like an insurance company statement. I hate to think of the number of men that will get undetected prostate cancer because they believe this statement and don't have a annual test done.
    HCFR Cycling Team
    Ride Safe ... Ride Hard ... Ride Daily

    2012 Colnago Ace
    2010 Giant Cypress


  25. #25
    Free Velo Vol! Dudelsack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Loovul
    My Bikes
    Bacchetta Giro ATT 26; Lemond Buenos Aires
    Posts
    6,200
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Help With Prostate Cancer Treatment

    I wonder about that too.

    I know a couple of men who have had multiple negative prostate biopsies because of a positive PSA. That's expensive but hardly life threatening.

    Medicine always follows the Golden Rule: he who has the gold makes the rules.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •