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  1. #1
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Changes with age

    I've been riding for about 15 years now and in the last few years I have had to change a few items on the bike to accomodate my changing body.My Items have been

    More upright position, not much but on the Mountain bike this was easily done by fitting riser bars;

    I have always used a Flite Titanium saddle, but this became uncomfortable about 2 years ago so went to a wider saddle with the Pelvic bone cutout. This caused chaffing at the groin, so have now reverted to a new Flite titanium, with the cutout and just a little gel insert. This is comfy, but on the Tandem, where I am even more upright, have gone to a wider Selle Italia Transam--Womans version. This is comfortable.

    I am no longer comfortable with any tightness around the waist, so have changed to bib shorts.

    Still on shorts-The normal chamois type liner has been changed to the Roadie type of thick foam for the longer rides

    The fingerless gloves have been changed to a full length finger glove for all round use.This is due to not being able to take the branch whips across the fingers that I used to be able to.

    What changes have the rest of you had to make to accomodate your advancing years?

  2. #2
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    Good post. I've been waiting for this one.
    I feel my balance diminishing. Can't trackstand like I used to.
    Curiously, I descend slower, but climb faster than ever.
    I am more jumpy and nervous in traffic than I used to be.
    Single trails don't have the allure that they once had.
    On the positive side, I ride a whole lot smarter now. Eat better. Dress better.
    My endurance is stronger than it ever was. I have a 122 km MTB tour that I do regularly. I never used to ride my MTB that long.
    Wish I could cherry-pick the best attributes of the years gone by, but there's no time for that. Got to ride TODAY.

    Over & out.

  3. #3
    Email for new group DnvrFox's Avatar
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    Last couple of rides on my mtn bike have been having some real noticeable "pain in the neck" problems.

    I had this on the road bike last year, but adjusted the bars up, and I was fine. This year, the problems are occuring even on the mtn bike. It is always the right side of my neck in the side-rear, a real sharp unending pain, and I still have it right now, even though I am headed out for a short trail ride.

    I have bar ends on the mtn bike, but they don't help much. I may boost the mtn bike bars a bit.

    Ow!
    Gone from the 50+ forum. - Email me at dnvrfox@aol.com for fun new group of 50+ folks

  4. #4
    Email for new group DnvrFox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swiss Hoser

    I feel my balance diminishing. Can't trackstand like I used to.

    Over & out.
    Recently read an article which stated that most balance problems of folks as they age are caused by decreased sensation in the sole of the foot. They fitted a bunch of folks with balance problems with some feet doo hickies that gave more sensation - I guess something with raised bumps - and their balance improved remarkably.

    How this relates to trackstanding, I haven't a clue?? Perhaps some special shoes?
    Gone from the 50+ forum. - Email me at dnvrfox@aol.com for fun new group of 50+ folks

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox
    Recently read an article which stated that most balance problems of folks as they age are caused by decreased sensation in the sole of the foot.
    I've read that balance problems are attributable to changes in the inner ear. My wife would confirm this.
    "Did you say something, Sweetie?"

  6. #6
    Senior Member skydive69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stapfam
    I've been riding for about 15 years now and in the last few years I have had to change a few items on the bike to accomodate my changing body.My Items have been

    More upright position, not much but on the Mountain bike this was easily done by fitting riser bars;

    I have always used a Flite Titanium saddle, but this became uncomfortable about 2 years ago so went to a wider saddle with the Pelvic bone cutout. This caused chaffing at the groin, so have now reverted to a new Flite titanium, with the cutout and just a little gel insert. This is comfy, but on the Tandem, where I am even more upright, have gone to a wider Selle Italia Transam--Womans version. This is comfortable.

    I am no longer comfortable with any tightness around the waist, so have changed to bib shorts.

    Still on shorts-The normal chamois type liner has been changed to the Roadie type of thick foam for the longer rides

    The fingerless gloves have been changed to a full length finger glove for all round use.This is due to not being able to take the branch whips across the fingers that I used to be able to.

    What changes have the rest of you had to make to accomodate your advancing years?
    Balance does diminish with age. One of the classical tests to determine physiological age, is to time the amount of seconds one can stand with one foot off the ground with the eyes closed. I have seen a scale that determines the extent of aging based on the results of that test.
    www.brokennecktobrokenrecords.com

  7. #7
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox
    Last couple of rides on my mtn bike have been having some real noticeable "pain in the neck" problems.

    I had this on the road bike last year, but adjusted the bars up, and I was fine. This year, the problems are occuring even on the mtn bike. It is always the right side of my neck in the side-rear, a real sharp unending pain, and I still have it right now, even though I am headed out for a short trail ride.

    I have bar ends on the mtn bike, but they don't help much. I may boost the mtn bike bars a bit.

    Ow!
    The main reason I Changed to riser bars, was this very problem of Neck pain. Risers bars bring the Grips 2" back and 2" Higher. I did try a short stem and 45Deg rise, but got fed up with being ridiculed by the younger set. I now conform to their fashion "ethics", but the short high rise stem does work just as well.

  8. #8
    Email for new group DnvrFox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox
    Recently read an article which stated that most balance problems of folks as they age are caused by decreased sensation in the sole of the foot. They fitted a bunch of folks with balance problems with some feet doo hickies that gave more sensation - I guess something with raised bumps - and their balance improved remarkably.

    How this relates to trackstanding, I haven't a clue?? Perhaps some special shoes?
    Ah HA!! Found it.

    http://asb-biomech.org/onlineabs/NACOB98/110/

    From a clinical perspective, it is noteworthy that the associations between cutaneous insensitivity and apparent difficulty in controlling compensatory stepping reactions have been demonstrated in active, and ostensibly healthy, older adults. Results such as these suggest that measures of vibration-detection thresholds may prove helpful, as an early indicator, in identifying older adults who may be susceptible to difficulty in controlling rapid balancing reactions. Our ongoing research is aimed at developing interventions, such as special footwear, that may help to compensate for such deficits and thereby reduce the risk of experiencing falls and related injuries.
    Gone from the 50+ forum. - Email me at dnvrfox@aol.com for fun new group of 50+ folks

  9. #9
    Jim Shapiro
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    Good question. I have been riding most of the 60 years since I learned and although the bicycles have certainly changed, I have made very few changes. I only started using clipless pedals a few years ago, and perhaps for this reason or perhaps because of my late start in life with these contraptions I have had a hell of a time getting used to them. I use either toe clips or pedal straps on all of my (7) bikes, save for my road bicycle, but the clipless pedals still make me rather nervous, especially in any stop-and-go traffic.

    I should mention, however, that I rarely take as long rides as the folks on this forum seem to. I ride typically 10 hilly miles daily during the week (at lunch) and take a longer, perhaps 20 to 30 mile ride, on weekends. I still sprint periodically and generally ride close to flat out all the time, so I couldn't possibly ride longer distances.

    I expect to be done building my single-speed/fixed gear bicycle this week and I can't imagine doing even my present distances on it. We'll see.

    Jim

  10. #10
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    I just turned 60, but I didn't start riding seriously until about 10 years ago, when my knees wouldn't take running anymore (I'd been a casual cyclist for years). I struggled along with essentially my college bike setup until I bought a Rivendell Atlantis five years ago, and a lot of their suggestions made sense. The big changes, in order of importance:
    --Raise the handlebars. Mine are level with the saddle (easy with a quill stem), and I'll never lower them. I can cruise comfortably, but still use the drops when I want to get aero.
    --Lower the gears. I'm using a 46-36-26 triple w/11-26 cassette, and it's fine (I live in Reno, with 8,000-foot mountain passes all around, so I need the granny). I'd keep that gearing even if I woke up tomorrow morning 21 years old again.
    --Cushier tires. I do most of my riding on 700x32 or 700x35 Panaracer Paselas, some on Rivendell Ruffy Tuffys labeled 27mm, but actually about as wide as the 32 Paselas. I almost never go over 100psi, and often run the 35s at 75-80.
    --A Brooks B-17 saddle.
    This isn't all just old-guy stuff. I've been riding off and on for more than 35 years, and one reason I didn't do it more is that I was never really comfortable on the bike. I wish I'd made these changes when I was 25, and I probably would have been a cyclist instead of a runner and I'd still have knee cartilage.
    As for the track stand, though, I haven't lost a thing. I couldn't do it in 1960 and I can't do it now.

  11. #11
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    My body started getting noticeably less tolerant to pain at about age 40. I fiddled around with saddles and handlebar height, but couldn't find any relief, so I got a recumbent.

  12. #12
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    I am 54 years old.

    Bought a Catrike Road recumbent May 04 after riding two-wheels for many a year. The recumbent is a complete turn around and eliminated many of the two-wheel hurts.

    Find I can ride the recumbent for hours without needing a rest, and arms and butt do not hurt.

  13. #13
    Drive the Bicycle.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velo Dog
    ...The big changes, in order of importance:
    --Raise the handlebars...
    --Lower the gears...
    --Cushier tires...
    == I made very similar changes to my road bike:
    1. Replaced the drop bars with commuter style.
    2. Moved the saddle down and back and added a gel cushion.
    3. Changed the gears for more power vs. speed.

    These changes had improved my enjoyment to where I can't wait to hit the road.

    Maybe a recumbent is in my future.

  14. #14
    'Bent Brian
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    Yup, I agree. A 'bent is the only way to travel. No pain. Just cruise away the miles. Besides with what other bike do you have the fun of learing to ride all over again, have a nice view as you pedal along, and if the road is good, hammer through the turns under power for a real seat of the pants ride.

    'bent Brian

  15. #15
    Jim Shapiro
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    Quote Originally Posted by bnet1
    Yup, I agree. A 'bent is the only way to travel. No pain. Just cruise away the miles. Besides with what other bike do you have the fun of learing to ride all over again, have a nice view as you pedal along, and if the road is good, hammer through the turns under power for a real seat of the pants ride.

    'bent Brian
    If you want a "set of the pants" ride, try a fixed gear through a turn. Think about it, the pedals keep going while you turn the handlebars and lean. There are two things that can happen if you don't stay focused, and both of them are bad.

  16. #16
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimshapiro
    If you want a "set of the pants" ride, try a fixed gear through a turn. Think about it, the pedals keep going while you turn the handlebars and lean. There are two things that can happen if you don't stay focused, and both of them are bad.
    I think he'd rather keep the seat of his pants in his seat, not on the road! Tadpole trikes can corner like go karts, and in fact I know one guy who, in a moment of brainlapse, took a corner at 28 mph. The trike took the turn fine, but he didn't hang on hard enough.

  17. #17
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
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    I've become more of a mid-to-back-of-the-packer. Finally realized that's where the ladies ride. Duh!

  18. #18
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    I am 74 and been riding regularly sinc I was 4. I now switched to folders. The folding bikes are designed with handlebars that could be make higher than the saddle. A must for older people. I could take my folder to a safer area. It is dangerous for elders to ride in congested road full of speeding cars.

    I started with a single speed Giant Halfway thinkking that a single speed is simpler and should be good enough for people my age. I had pains in my knees every time I go up hill with the Halfway single speed. I had to ordered a 7 speed halfway. It suit me well, no more knee pains. I replaced the saddle with a Brooks B66 Champion. Very comfortable bike and feel safe riding in trafic.

  19. #19
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    Most of this sounds familiar. I had to cut back and then quit running after 50. I tried to spend more time on my Rockhopper. Aches all over: wrists, shoulders, butt. I bought a recumbent (Rans Stratus) and then a recumbent trike (Greenspeed GTO). I love the trike as I can ride farther and in more comfort than I thought was possible. But, I also wanted something for public transport travel, so I just ordered a Dahon folding bike with the handle bars above the seat as a comfort bike.

    Aging is like counter punching. It hits you from one direction and you come back from another. Biking is a great ally in this struggle.

    Regards,

    Gary

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