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  1. #26
    Senior Member Frankfast's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=JohnJ80;14867266]You know, I don't even think about it. It's automatic to twist my foot to move it off the pedal. I've never understood this issue with clipless contributing to falls and never had an issue with it.


    Some of us get it. Some of us don't. I, for one, am having trouble.

  2. #27
    Dharma Dog lhbernhardt's Avatar
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    " I DON'T WANT TO BELONG TO ANY CLUB THAT WILL ACCEPT PEOPLE LIKE ME AS A MEMBER" - Groucho Marx

    Luis

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    Meets the main criteria? What criteria could he possibly not be meeting? He fell over in front of a car that had a family with little kids in it.
    Well, I hate to be picky, but it's not at all clear that the mom in that family came over and offered to put a band-aid on his scrape. Isn't an offer of assistance from any female eyewitnesses a required element of a Full Tombay?

  4. #29
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    There are certain grades of acceptance into Club Tombay and this has qualified for the basic membership in that left foot unclipped and fall right. Several other types of fall and as the severity- the hilarity and injuries sustained increase then the grading will go up aswell. Other factors also increase the grade such as sympathy from bystanders and the number of off-duty nurses that rendered assistance and first aid- Or the fact that complete Brain fade led to the fall.

    And it has been recognised that clipless pedals are not the only pedal that can qualify you for entry. Even platforms will aid entry on rare occasions.

    And not trying to turn the posting into clipless versus other pedals but you either get on with clipless or you don't. First ride out on mine and I managed 35 miles with numerous stops before I just stopped-didn't think and just fell over. No attempt made to unclip whatsoever. Brain Fade is a major contributor. After 20 years of using them- I cannot ride comfortably without them. It is just natural that the foot is released and placed on the ground without a thought. A few incidents have occurred at slow speed where I have had to stop suddenly and my skill at trackstanding has got me out of trouble. In fact the only fall I have had in the last 6 years was down to NOT being clipped in. A Few walkers in the way on a path and I unclipped as I may hav had to stop. They did see me and got out of my way- put power on the pedals and over I went, The cleat was not engaged and my foot slipped off the pedal.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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  5. #30
    Senior Member volosong's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    You know, I don't even think about it. It's automatic to twist my foot to move it off the pedal. I've never understood this issue with clipless contributing to falls and never had an issue with it.

    Now, going to be the real toe clips and cleated shoes that predated clipless - now THAT took some thought since you had to reach down and undow the toeclip strap. You foot was locked in otherwise.

    Maybe that's why it's not an issue with me. After years of riding old school toe clips and cleats, anything seems easy.

    J.
    Well stated. My experience also.
    Deut 6:5

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    "Ha ha! You fool! You fell victim to one of the classic blunders - The most famous of which is 'never get involved in a land war in Asia'".
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  6. #31
    Senior Member gcottay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papa Tom View Post
    I know I'm already beating this concept to death on another thread, but why did you feel the need to go clipless? If you're afraid of falling and not being able to unclip, why not just use platform pedals?
    Fair question.

    This clipless rider

    1) was never good with toe clips and straps.
    2) appreciates the smoothness and power of a sorta complete stroke
    3) likes have a secure position on the pedal especially over hard bumps
    4) isn't much afraid of falling.
    5) is willing to put up with changing shoes even though he would rather not.

    Clips, clipless and platform all work.
    George
    Laissez les bon temps rouler

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papa Tom View Post
    I know I'm already beating this concept to death on another thread, but why did you feel the need to go clipless? If you're afraid of falling and not being able to unclip, why not just use platform pedals?
    I've only been riding my road bike for a short time, and have never tried clipless, and for now, that's the way I'm choosing to keep it because I AM genuinely afraid of falling and tweaking a wrist, hand, or elbow. I'm a professional musician and if I can't play, I don't eat. I'm aware I may be missing out on something sticking with platforms, but so be it (I am however using VP Thin Gripster pedals with the little spikes and Chromes shoes and I will say, my feet largely stay where I put 'em with that combo--I feel pretty darn "stuck").

  8. #33
    Saved by Grace lphilpot's Avatar
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    I'm still using toe clips and like the ability to walk in regular shoes when stopped but I'm slowly becoming a bit more interested in clipless. A friend of mine uses Speedplays and they appear to be pretty intrusive to the walking process. In general, which (road) cleats are easiest to walk on? SPDs?
    Len Philpot - 2012 Specialized Tricross Sport
    I start out slow and then taper off from there...

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by lphilpot View Post
    I'm still using toe clips and like the ability to walk in regular shoes when stopped but I'm slowly becoming a bit more interested in clipless. A friend of mine uses Speedplays and they appear to be pretty intrusive to the walking process. In general, which (road) cleats are easiest to walk on? SPDs?
    No road cleats.

    You would have to use MTB or touring shoes and MTB cleats and pedals.

    Shimano SPDs are good and have been around forever.

    I've used Time Atacs for a long time and like how they function, but the brass cleats wear too quickly for my liking.

    For the first time, I am using Shimano MTBs cleats with Shimano pedals that have one side as a platform and the other with the clip-in mechanism. It gives the flexibility of using ordinary shoes or cycling shoes. They're working quite well on our current tour.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  10. #35
    Senior Member Ancient Mariner's Avatar
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    I can sympathize. I had this happen 4 times in a (roughly) two week period. In every incident, I was nearly stopped, but for various reasons, started leaning towards the foot that was still clipped in. I'm now happily riding my road bike with mountain bike pedals, and feeling no shame. I'm also feeling a lot more confident that no matter which way I lean, I can get a foot to the ground in a hurry. I'm 70, and I just don't shake things off like younger people. It's not worth the risk, regardless of the benefits.

  11. #36
    Senior Member Doug64's Avatar
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    My judo teacher said,"do the move 1000 times and it is yours". I think I'm well past that with my clipless pedals.

    I've had several major crashes in the last 20 years and none of them were the result of clipless pedals, except one.

    The first time I tried clipless pedals after using toe straps and cleats for 20 years, I had a serious crash. Toe straps and cleats hold you foot securely no matter how much you try to twist your foot. A friend loaned me a set off Look pedals and his shoes. I was coming down a hill at relatively high speed with the borrowed pedals and shoes when I twisted in the saddle to look behind me before taking the lane. As I twisted my body , I twisted my foot at the same time unclipping rather suddenly. I went over the bars, landing in the center of a busy highway. I just lost a lot of skin, but my bike was toast. I did get a new bike out of the deal. However, there are easier ways to get a new bike!

    Use whatever works for you.
    Last edited by Doug64; 10-22-12 at 08:19 PM.

  12. #37
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    Just yesterday I took my first ride with my new Shimano pedals and Bontrager shoes, I practiced clipping and unclipping in the house while leaning against a door frame for about 5-6 cycles. Went out and took a short 5.5 mile ride in some nice hills and really liked the solid feeling the setup gave me. We'll see about falling or not, my routes are pretty much all road and no stopping. That said, I don't doubt my capacity to execute a Tombay in spectacular fashion, I'll just have to watch getting complacent as I get used to being solidly attached to the bike.

    SSTX

  13. #38
    Senior Member Frankfast's Avatar
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    I finally found a combination of shoes and pedals that works well for me. I shelved my Look Keo Classic pedals and road shoes and reinstalled my Nashbar platform one side, clipless the other. I put a set of Shimano cleats into the recesses of a pair of Lake MTB shoes. Now I can walk normally. I ride through traffic with lights, pedestrians, etc. on the platform side of the pedals without fear of the shoes slipping off. Once i reach the open road, I clip into the other side. On the lightest setting they are much easier to clip in and out of than the Look system. I can now relegate the Looks to my geared bike for longer events. The pedals and shoes are lighter and would be advantageous as long as I didn't have to clip in and out much. But I feel relieved now that I've found a system that seems to work and don't have to wonder if I'm going to fall. I can enjoy the ride again. I recommend it to anyone having trouble with clipless pedals.
    Last edited by Frankfast; 10-23-12 at 09:20 AM. Reason: addition

  14. #39
    Senior Member RedC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSTX View Post
    Just yesterday I took my first ride with my new Shimano pedals and Bontrager shoes, I practiced clipping and unclipping in the house while leaning against a door frame for about 5-6 cycles. Went out and took a short 5.5 mile ride in some nice hills and really liked the solid feeling the setup gave me. We'll see about falling or not, my routes are pretty much all road and no stopping. That said, I don't doubt my capacity to execute a Tombay in spectacular fashion, I'll just have to watch getting complacent as I get used to being solidly attached to the bike.

    SSTX
    I'm 70 and too big to fall but I'm a lot more afraid of falling because my foot slipped off the pedal when I was moving than because I forgot to unclip standing still. I went to clipless pedals 4 years ago and like everyone else, I have some embarrassing incidents to remember but I have never hurt anything but my dignity from a clipless fall and after a time uncliping becomes automatic. Last weekend because I wasn't paying attention to what I was doing I missed a little bridge coming back from the restroom and the front wheel stopped but I went over the handlebars and because I was clipped in the bicycle followed me and landed safely on my fat butt. My riding buddy says the important thing to remember is that skin grows back but you can't grow carbon fiber
    Red, like the color my hair used to be.

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  15. #40
    Lanterne rouge 16Victor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    After years of riding old school toe clips and cleats, anything seems easy.
    Second that. I still reach down every now and then to loosen the strap...which isn't there any longer. Nicest thing about clipless is no more knee pain from having the foot↔pedal interface rigidly locked down.

    AFA fixing my foot to the pedal in general, I wouldn't even think of a medium or long ride without some sort of fastening.
    Ron
    Any problem can be solved with the proper application of force, heat, chemicals, or money.

  16. #41
    Senior Member Flying Merkel's Avatar
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    My road & touring bikes have Crank Bros pedals. Got a set for my mountain bike, didn't like them for offroad- but I love them for road use. Using Shimano MTB shoes. Grew up on toe clips, clipless is way better. The few falls I consider learning experiences.
    Pronounced "Murkle"

  17. #42
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    When I first got my clipless pedals, a friend told me I'd fall three times. I did, and within the first three months. That was seven years ago, haven't fallen since. What I've found works for me is to make a slight left turn as I'm stopping. That way I always am leaning to the left.
    Only mad dogs, Englishmen, and triathletes go out in the mid day sun.

  18. #43
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    I have had two Tombay experiences (well one full tombay - sensesly forgetting to unclip at a stop sign next to a bus stop with a bunch of people who sat there and laughed as I came to a stop and keeled over) and one near tombay that also almost resulted in assaulting an officer of the law. Let me explain. I was cruising up to the local starbucks to meet some riding partners for a ride, and noticed our beat officer and another policeman sitting out front having coffee. I thought I would ride up and say hello, got up to their table, stopped, and forgot to put my foot down. I keeled over, luckily it was towards the table and I was able to get my hand out to stop my fall. Unfortunately in the process I knocked over a coffee that soaked our beat officer. Not a great way to get in good with the constabulary. For a few months after that, I kept a piece of red duct tape on my handlebars with "unclip" written on it, so I wouldn't forget

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by lphilpot View Post
    I'm still using toe clips and like the ability to walk in regular shoes when stopped but I'm slowly becoming a bit more interested in clipless. A friend of mine uses Speedplays and they appear to be pretty intrusive to the walking process. In general, which (road) cleats are easiest to walk on? SPDs?
    Shimano makes two types of pedals: SPD-SL and SPD. SPD use a two bolt connection, and are commonly referred to as being mountain bike pedals. If you combine these with a shoe that has a cleat recess, you will be able to walk normally. Most shoes with a recess are mountain bike shoes, but there are some that are more road oriented. I use the Shimano PD-A600 pedal and wear Pearl Izumi Allroad shoes. The shoes are heavier than pure road shoes, but you can get off and walk normally. Also, since they have a rubber tread, you can be assured that when you put your foot down, it will stay where you placed it even if the road is a little slippery. For suburban riding, I think it works very well. I've even used them in a triathlon. For city use, I think I'd stick with toe clips with the straps left loose.

    Crank Bros. pedals also use a two bolt cleat that will fit in the recess.
    Only mad dogs, Englishmen, and triathletes go out in the mid day sun.

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