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Old 11-14-12, 07:37 AM   #1
NOS88
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Update on City Commuter

Several weeks ago I posted about my "Upright CIty Commuter" I built from extra parts and a Nashbar aluminum touring frame.

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...build-finished

Iíd like to provide an update now that I've had some time to commute on it.

First, let me say that the bike has accomplished what I wanted rather well. It provides a very upright position making visibility in traffic quite good. With the addition of the Tubus rack I've been able to carry two panniers with laptop, lunch, extra clothesÖ.all-in-all about 26 lbs of load on the days when I must carry the most. Even with the additional load the bike is stable and very predictable. The upright position has created a bit more work in that there is virtually no aerodynamic advantage. But, since Iím rarely moving more that 12 to 14 mph in traffic; it has not been a real problem. If I were out for five to six hours a day taking that much wind, it would be a real annoyance.
Now Iíll move on to some of the specific details. While a bit on the heavy side, the Cannondale fork, salvaged from a Cídale T800, works well. It may have a bit more rake than ideal, but the bike is still stable enough for hands free riding. Perhaps Iím just used to a tighter front end? The triple crank has worked well. I think, however, I might swap out the large chain ring for a chain ring guard. Realistically, Iím not likely to need the big ring for the commute Iím doing. The lowest gear, however, is one Iím going to keep. In the attached photo the largest rear cog is 30 teeth, but Iíve swapped this out for one that is 34 teeth. This gives me a 30 X 34 or 24 inch low. I believe I could climb a wall with it. Given Iíve one 19% grade climb on my return trip home; the low gearing is quite welcome. The Selle Anatomica Titanico saddle is working well. It took two or three rides to get the tilt and tension adjusted properly. I think there are some folks that never get to like this saddle, because they donít adjust both tension and tilt. It is the right combination of both that really allows fine tuning. The Mavic Open Pro rims on Ultegra hubs are trouble free, as one might expect. The Deoro derailleurs are working just fine. The real nice surprise, however, is just how good the TRP CX9 brakes are. I can lock up the wheels with ease should I desire. The soft lever feel takes a bit of getting used to, but after the second commute, it was natural. I do wish the SKS mudguards were just a bit longer. There is still enough spray to get your feet wet if you have to ride through too much water.
Well, Iíve rambled on enough. Suffice to say that Iím happy with the build and would not hesitate to recommend such a build for others who must commute in heavy traffic with loads.
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File Type: jpg 10 completed bike 10.jpg (99.7 KB, 47 views)
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Old 11-17-12, 09:46 PM   #2
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Nice job; I also went back and checked your other posting on this. So I read about your reasoning for selecting a larger frame size for the upright positioning. I tried a friend's build of your same Nashbar frame, and I was surprised that the 54cm seemed to fit me like my previous Trek 58cm. So my question is what is the standover height of your 58 cm frame?
Thanks. You have a great looking bike.
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Old 11-18-12, 07:45 AM   #3
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Standover height is just over 81 mm. It's only 3 mm more than my largest road bike. When wearing dress pants, blue jeans, or any non-cycling related bottoms, it just barely touches the fabric. When wearing lycra cycling shorts (seldom worn on this bike) it makes no contact at all. Now, in my stocking feet, it's another story! Glad I don't ride that way. It would make dismounting a whole new experience.
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Old 11-18-12, 02:33 PM   #4
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The completed build looks really professional and well thought out NOS. Thanks for the update and the pic on the new build, you did very well sir.

Bill
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Old 11-18-12, 05:24 PM   #5
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The completed build looks really professional and well thought out NOS. Thanks for the update and the pic on the new build, you did very well sir.

Bill
I quite agree... And, I like it's rather elegant simplicity.

But I am curious: if the main concerns were: "Upright" and "Commuter" why did you elect to go with drop bars? I don't have any biases against them -- actually I tend to like them over flat bars. But it seems to me that they tend to pull one OUT of the upright posture...

So, knowing that you thought this out very carefully I am curious what I am missing here?
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Old 11-18-12, 07:31 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by GeorgeBMac View Post
I quite agree... And, I like it's rather elegant simplicity.

But I am curious: if the main concerns were: "Upright" and "Commuter" why did you elect to go with drop bars? I don't have any biases against them -- actually I tend to like them over flat bars. But it seems to me that they tend to pull one OUT of the upright posture...

So, knowing that you thought this out very carefully I am curious what I am missing here?
They are what I had. I was tyring to build this with only the frame being purchased as new.
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Old 11-18-12, 08:55 PM   #7
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They are what I had. I was tyring to build this with only the frame being purchased as new.
Hey! That's as good a reason as any and better than most!

I hope you enjoy this bike as much as I think you will. Perhaps one day I will be able to do something similar. But right now I am long ways away from that level of ability. But I can't think of anything I would enjoy more than riding a bike I had built myself...

Again: Congratulations! That is a very nice looking bike.
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Old 11-18-12, 09:21 PM   #8
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Nice build..........looks like a comfortable commuter.

That seat looks interesting. Can you compare this one to others seats you've tried? And how will this seat hold up in the rain?
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Old 11-19-12, 05:24 AM   #9
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The Selle Anatomica Titanico is different from the Selle Italia SLK that I use on all my other bikes. It is much more comfortable for a more upright riding position. It is slightly wider in the back, and more supple in the mid section. It is also longer with one of the longest rail sections I've even seen. For my normal riding position (much less upright) I like a firmer saddle - the SLK. This particular model is their "watershed" model. It's been ridden in the rain quite a bit with no issues. Given I'm on it while riding and that the bike has fenders, it never gets all that wet. However, even when I've had to change a flat tire in the rain, exposing the seat completely, the watershed treatment seemed to do its job. Right now there are some limited color choices on sale via their web site. www.selleanatomica.com
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