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Old 01-22-13, 01:42 PM   #1
David Bierbaum
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Point of curiosity for Winter riding on the cheap

Instead of buying studded snow tires, I'm curious if anyone has tried a cheapo alternative putting a strip (or patches) of shoe-goo or rubber-cement down the center of the tire, and putting a layer of sand or grit on the strip (or patches) and letting it dry?

Call me stupid. No really, please just call me stupid! but it seems like this method could get one around town for a day before all the grit wears off, and give one some traction on ice or hard-packed snow. Has anyone tried a penurious penny-pinching "my life is worth less than my pocketbook" approach like this?

I was wondering, since it's spitting snow outside at the moment, and I need to do some grocery shopping.
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Old 01-22-13, 01:56 PM   #2
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My experience with anything applied to a tyre's tread is that it will not adhere for any length of time. Some of the more experienced hands here may know of an adhesive that would last, I honestly don't think much will.

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Old 01-22-13, 02:09 PM   #3
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Maybe whatever they use to glue tubular tires. Or vulcanizing patches. I'm just guessing but if your brakes/fork could handle it what if you cut an old tire, say 32c or 35c, poked stubby screws through it and wrapped it around your 19c-26c tire? Maybe lace up the cut end with nylon cord drawing it really tight. And rode really slow. It might work?
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Old 01-22-13, 02:10 PM   #4
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... roger. That leaves stuff like punching thumbtacks (or screwing screws) through my old Nimbus tires...

I think I'll just drive. That's too much like WORK!

Edit: Though that ersatz studded tire-glove thingy sounds like it might actually work, though the lacing might be a bit problematic...

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Old 01-22-13, 03:08 PM   #5
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In your area, studded tires may not be needed much or often, so if it were me, I would just attempt my ride without anything and be cautious and keep the speed down. Your not really putting your life on the line. If you happen to slip and fall at low speed, I don't think it will kill you. Just be careful if your in traffic because that is a different story. Don't do anything where you may fall in harms way and get run over by a car. Other than that, I think like others mentioned, not sure of anything that would adhere to the tire very long and make any appreciable difference. In the great white North, we use our studded tires from the last week of November to the first week in April so they are very well worth it.
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Old 01-22-13, 04:29 PM   #6
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Only for use with disc brakes

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Old 01-22-13, 04:46 PM   #7
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Back in the mid-70's, I had recently moved to Vancouver, Canada and was getting used to riding in snow and ice, which doesn't really happen that often. I think I had read some article in Bike World about making your own studded tires using roofing nails (they have very wide, round heads). So as I recall, I took an old Michelin 50 and stuck roofing nails thru it about every four inches or so. I then took a wire cutter and cut down the points so they were flush with the tire. I installed it on the front (you really only need a studded tire on the front), pumped up the tire, and the thing worked like a hot damn. For about five or ten minutes, and then the innertube went flat from rubbing against the heads of the roofing nails inside the tire.

I think if I were to do it again, I would insert a Mr. Tuffy tube protector between the nail heads and the innertube. Even then, I kinda doubt it would work. But just poking roofing nails thru a tire is a lot of work!

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Old 01-22-13, 04:52 PM   #8
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Back in the mid-70's, I had recently moved to Vancouver, Canada and was getting used to riding in snow and ice, which doesn't really happen that often. I think I had read some article in Bike World about making your own studded tires using roofing nails (they have very wide, round heads). So as I recall, I took an old Michelin 50 and stuck roofing nails thru it about every four inches or so. I then took a wire cutter and cut down the points so they were flush with the tire. I installed it on the front (you really only need a studded tire on the front), pumped up the tire, and the thing worked like a hot damn. For about five or ten minutes, and then the innertube went flat from rubbing against the heads of the roofing nails inside the tire.

I think if I were to do it again, I would insert a Mr. Tuffy tube protector between the nail heads and the innertube. Even then, I kinda doubt it would work. But just poking roofing nails thru a tire is a lot of work!

Luis
Yes, way too much work for sure. If you ride on ice and snow regularly just get the studded tires and put them on both front and rear, you wouldn't believe the difference it makes. JMO
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Old 01-22-13, 05:01 PM   #9
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I've known of some mountain bikers wanting to get out and do trail riding in snow and ice who make their own studded tires by taking a set of old MTB knobbies and driving lath screws threw them in a regular pattern. They swear it works great.
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Old 01-22-13, 05:10 PM   #10
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I've known of some mountain bikers wanting to get out and do trail riding in snow and ice who make their own studded tires by taking a set of old MTB knobbies and driving lath screws threw them in a regular pattern. They swear it works great.
Sure, the screws should be ok for trail riding. Just not good on roads. It would ride really rough and erratic.
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Old 01-22-13, 05:56 PM   #11
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I made my own using short screws wuth nice smooth heads. Put about 100 per tire in and theb taped the inside of ig until there was no chance of a puncture. They are just about the same length as the height of knobs on the tires so they only dig into ice and snow. 2 months abd no flats. Traction is awesome, but its a bad idea to
let the pressure get too low unless you want a really slow hard ride. Those things dig into the road.
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Old 01-22-13, 06:02 PM   #12
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When I used to commute during the winter months I had made a pair of studded tires for my mountain bike. They work well on ice, but are quite slow. Expect to replace screws as the wear down. Never tried stainless screws, but suspect they would last longer. Make sure you line the tire well to protect the tube from the screw heads. Mr Tuffy works great for this, just make sure it does not move off center.
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Old 01-22-13, 06:06 PM   #13
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There is a whole forum devoted to winter cycling and I have posted a tutorial on how to stud your own tyres there, you can also follow the link in my signature as the same directions are on my website.
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Old 01-22-13, 06:29 PM   #14
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Quote:
Mr Tuffy works great for this, just make sure it does not move off center.
The green tape thats used for holding moving boxed shut in Korea - kind of like thin duct tape works great as a tire liner. Thin and flexible enough to take the shape of the tire, Strong enough to keep the sharp edges away from the tube. a couple of good layers of that and your tube is totally safe. Now getting the nasty sharp studded tire on and off is another story.
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Old 01-22-13, 07:03 PM   #15
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Studded tires are a lot cheaper than broken bones. Cheap insurance, IME.

Hell, studded tires are cheaper than just one co-pay due to broken bones.
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Old 01-22-13, 08:19 PM   #16
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Old 01-23-13, 08:44 AM   #17
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I commute all winter long and have never been tempted to get studded tires. My experience with them on cars showed me their best value was when powering through a slick spot --essentially carving deeply into the ice to get traction. I can't (don't want to) do that on a bike. I'm not convinced studs would be any better on ice, AND 99.9% of the time I'm not actually on glare ice or can totally avoid those patches. (I can't believe I'm going to say this)--I have never fallen on ice yet. I am careful to stay in balance on top of the bike (no leaning) when on slippery patches.

Edit: But now that I think of it.. in rutted ice it might be very useful to have side studs at least.
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Old 01-23-13, 09:08 AM   #18
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I'm going to try it - wrapping a studded tire around the regular tire, not the glue idea. I think you could tie it on like a snow chain. I might not have enough clearance on my road bike though so it's a likely fail.
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Old 01-23-13, 11:11 AM   #19
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I know that some classes of automobile ice racing use ground walnut shells in the tire compound. As far as I know, nobody has used glued-on sand.

I have ridden in snow since the age of 13. Don't touch the front brakes, go easy on the rear brakes, use platform pedals, and be willing to slide one or more feet on the surface for stabilization Lowering the seat can help in this. A bike with reasonably wide, non-studded tires is about as capable (or incapable) as a normal rear wheel drive car without chains or "all season" tires. If the snow is wet and only an inch or so deep, narrow tires will cut right down to the pavement and work well. I've done this with my wife's road bike.

When I was 13, I really liked sliding sideways down hills with clouds of snow sparkling around me. Nowdays, though, riding in ice and snow without studs is just too much work. There's an eensi-eensie tightrope-walking sort of feeling that is unpleasant. In contrast, gliding along on dreamlike, smooth black ice with studs is one of cycling's greatest pleasures.

Sometimes, there is an early snow, and I don't have time to switch tires. If one is careful, you can ride in snow unequipped.

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Old 01-24-13, 02:02 PM   #20
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Only for use with disc brakes

you are a creative, sick man.......me likey.
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Old 01-24-13, 07:25 PM   #21
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Only for use with disc brakes

This is one of those things that looks like a good idea, but in reality is an epic fail

See http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...t=zip+tie+tire
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Old 01-24-13, 07:44 PM   #22
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Having gotten a Pair of Nokian Mount and Ground studded tires , Imported Facrory Direct from Finland

22 years ago, and they are still usable, and just cost about $20 a piece, 2 bucks a year is not a bad cost..
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