Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Email for new group DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Send email to dnvrfox@aol.com for new group
    Posts
    20,883
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've noticed a few newer 50+ folks who seemd to not be aware that intensive bicycling increases the chances of developing osteoporosis, and that weight-bearing resistive exercises can help prevent osteo. So, I am reposting a previous post of 01-24-04.

    From Bicycling Magazine which came to my home on 01-23-04

    Some quotes:

    While discussing an orthopedic surgeon/cross country biker age 51 who seemed in excellent health, " . . . the appearance and vitality of a man far younger than his 51 years. He also has the low bone denisty of a man in his 70's and is on the road to osteoporosis."

    "27 male racers ages 40-60 . . . trained average of 12.2 hours a week for 20 years . . . bone densities were 10% lower than a control group . . . Clinically, 10 percent thinning is significant - not good - almost frightening."

    "2/3rd's of the cyclists studied already showed signs of at least osteopenia (moderate bone loss). Four had full blown osteoporosis."

    "Rich Templin, a legendary mega-miler, has the hip and lower-spine bone densities of someone almost twice his age."

    "You are at increased risk if you are Caucasian or asian, have a parent with osteoporosis, trained to excess as a youth, or took steroids."

    In addition to elite cyclists being particularly at risk, it seems that even recreational cyclists are somewhat at risk.

    The mechanism: Calcium is lost through sweat (something we cyclists know about). To be replaced, osteoclasts prep bones to receive a new layer of calcium. As we age, less is replaced, but this can be stopped with a good diet combined with physical activity that includes physical impact, G-Forces and vibration (road biking does not give enough vibration).

    Suggestions -

    1. Calcium and Vit D supplements (1,200 "Ca" spread over the day along with 400-800 IU of "d").

    2. Yogurt and milk

    3. No smoking, less alcohol, and really less soda, (phosphates really depletes the Ca)

    4. Lift weights at least 2x's/wk, YEAR ROUND. It suggests heavy lifting to failure.

    5. Back exercises such as extensions 2x's week

    6. Run, hike, skip rope or jump around.

    7. Stand up on your bike more often.

    8. Mountain bike more

    9. Get a bone scan.

    The article is much longer. I have just presented the highlights.

    "For recreational riders, cycling is not as good, bone-wise, as other fitness activities."

    Note: My youngest son had severe osteo and no one knew it. He fell out of bed and fractured his L-5 vertebrae, and is still recovering from the paralysis. The drug Fosamax (and similar) are pretty effective in helping to build back up the bone density. Osteo is no fun.
    Last edited by DnvrFox; 02-14-05 at 06:48 AM.
    Gone - email me at dnvrfox@aol.com for new group of old 50+ folks

  2. #2
    Senior Member skydive69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Seminole, FL
    My Bikes
    Guru Geneo, Specialized Roubaix Pro, Guru chron 'alu, Specialized Sequoia
    Posts
    2,258
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Gee Fox, you can't win. Running is a great weight bearing exercise, but it beats the crap out of your knees and hips, etc. Well, at least I do weights two times a week, take a gram of calcium daily, and use OJ with calcium & vitamin D. Of course I also take a handful of various suppliments.
    www.brokennecktobrokenrecords.com

  3. #3
    5am
    5am is offline
    RideLong
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Arlington, Virginia
    My Bikes
    Specialized Allez Elite III (2004)
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Happened to me. Rode 2-3k annually in my 30's till injuries put me off my bike for about a decade. Now I've got osteo very bad in my hips and lower spine. My doc says it's "normal" for a man my age (55), but I'll be darned if the pain seems "normal" to me. Alas, my doc just looks at me with ho-hum eyes, and that's that. I've found that since returning to my bike in my 50's I have little or no hip or spine pain while riding and if I don't ride for a few days my arthritis actually feels worse.

    Now I wonder if taking any of those recommended supplements will do any good as I'm already experiencing osteo problems.

  4. #4
    Email for new group DnvrFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Send email to dnvrfox@aol.com for new group
    Posts
    20,883
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Now I wonder if taking any of those recommended supplements will do any good as I'm already experiencing osteo problems
    Fosamax or siimilar drug will do wonders for osteo. Actually reverse
    Gone - email me at dnvrfox@aol.com for new group of old 50+ folks

  5. #5
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    My Bikes
    Lemond Victoire, Cannondale.Mountain Bike, two 1980s lugged steel Treks, ancient 1980-something Giant mountain bike converted into a slick tired commuter with mustache handlebars, 1960-something Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    2,722
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So if you take calcium and Vitamin D, do you also need phosphorus--or any additional supplement--to help absorb the calcium properly?
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  6. #6
    Sore saddle cyclist Shifty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Eugene, OR
    My Bikes
    Road, touring and mountain
    Posts
    3,760
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox
    Fosamax or siimilar drug will do wonders for osteo. Actually reverse
    Fosamax is a miracle drug, it works very fast in restoring bone density. It is a prescribed drug, so your Dr. will advise if you should, or should not take it. The down side, (always has to be one of those) it is very, very expensive. It will, if you are not careful and follow instructions to the letter, eat holes in your esophagus. To prevent problems you need to remain standing while it is being absorbed into your stomach(30 minutes or so), which prevents it from going back up into the esophagus.

    Viactive, on the other hand, is effective and cheap,( I buy it at Costco in the giant economy size) and is like eating candy. We can all benefit from this one. Thanks for the post
    Those voices in your head aren't real, but they have some great ideas

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •