Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-13-13, 06:10 PM   #1
Lioness1961
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 5
Considering taking up bicycling--Cannondale T700?

I am a woman of mature years considering taking up bicycling. I am considering the purchase (for short money) of a decent 1995 Cannondale T700. Eventually, should I enjoy this as much as anticipated, I will purchase a better bicycle more suited to my riding preferences.

For right now, I am looking for more of a touring style vs. a racing or road style.

Thoughts? Things to look for or avoid? Naturally, my local bike shop will service the machine, but from what I have researched and read, if the bike is the appropriate size and in reasonable condition, this may be a good entry level machine for me.
Lioness1961 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-13, 07:52 PM   #2
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
Posts: 6,912
They are highly regarded touring bikes and worth some money. The frame can be upgraded with all the modern bits you like. You may never buy another bike. Ask over in Classic & Vintage for more details.
jyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-13, 08:08 PM   #3
Shamrock
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Garden State exit 135
Bikes:
Posts: 438
Being a mature woman is a problem.Most of us are kids in old aging bodies.Hop on a bike and tell us of any problems.We are here to help.Good luck
Shamrock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-13, 08:08 PM   #4
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: In Central IN
Bikes: RANS V3, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
Posts: 13,225
The average citizen would call that a road bike, but yes, the T700 is a classic touring-style bike. If it is in functional condition and you are comfortable on it, sounds like a good starter bike.
__________________
RANS V3 - Ti, RANS V-Rex - cromo, RANS Screamer - cromo
JanMM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-13, 12:03 AM   #5
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Bikes:
Posts: 6,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamrock View Post
Being a mature woman is a problem.Most of us are kids in old aging bodies.Hop on a bike and tell us of any problems.We are here to help.Good luck
She didn't say she is mature. She said she is of mature years. It's never too late to have a happy childhood, as we all know.
B. Carfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-13, 12:21 AM   #6
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
Posts: 19,915
That first bike to get you riding- or back riding- is not that important on style or age. However it should be in good condition- feel comfortable to ride and FIT you. Reason I say that is that all the first bike is there for is to tell you what your second bike will be--Which you have already recognised. One thing you will not be able to get right from the start and that is you. Expect some muscle ache- butt ache and to find some new muscles that you never knew you had.

Enjoy the bike.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-13, 07:29 AM   #7
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
Posts: 6,912
Also - there is, [sing]somewhere out there, over the rainbow [/sing], a comfortable saddle for you and for each of us. Somewhat counter-intuitively, it is not a fat padded saddle; those get more awful the more you ride. You just have to keep trying saddles and fine-tuning your riding position until you find The One. Try a Terry or other woman-specific saddle. In the meantime, padded cycling shorts are helpful.
jyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-13, 03:26 PM   #8
Lioness1961
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
She didn't say she is mature. She said she is of mature years. It's never too late to have a happy childhood, as we all know.
Growing old is inevitable. Growing up is optional.

Actually, with this bike, I want to ensure that it fits my rather petite stature. I am particularly concerned about not making a crash landing on the top bar. Years of step-through bikes will do that, I guess. Then we can move on to saddles, pedals and the like. I will have to purchase pedals if I get this bike. Thoughts? The idea of locking one's shod foot onto a pedal unnerves me. Guess it is all that residual "getting hung up in a stirrup" thing from decades of owning, showing and jumping horses.

I so appreciate everyone's thoughts, observations and input. Thank you.
Lioness1961 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-13, 04:22 PM   #9
NOS88
Senior Member
 
NOS88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
Bikes:
Posts: 6,490
When I re-entered cycling I started on a Cannondale T800. It's basically the frame with slightly upgraded components. I put 10s of thousands of miles on that bike with no problems at all. I'd do it all over again if given the chance. BTW, welcome to BF 50+.

There's no reason you can't start riding with platform pedals until you get more comfortable. They're not that expensive.
__________________
A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. - S. Wright
Favorite rides in the stable: Indy Fab CJ Ti - Colnago MXL - S-Works Roubaix - Habanero Team Issue - Jamis Eclipse carbon/831
NOS88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-13, 05:44 PM   #10
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
Posts: 6,912
How tall are you? Your bike inseam? Do you know what size bike you need?

When one is on the shorter side - say, below 5' 6" or so - it becomes increasingly hard to find quality used bikes that fit. They are out there but it takes more looking. I learned that when helping a friend who is 5' 1" find a bike that had to be (1) classy (2) very small (3) cheap. On the other hand, quality new bikes are widely available in diminutive sizes. The bike industry has learned that women are an important market.

I'd use inexpensive platform pedals for a few weeks, then switch to clipless. Clipless pedals offer significant advantages. There are also platform pedals with a SPD binding built in, some are even non-clunky. I understand the fear of being trapped, and you are indeed likely to fall once during the learning curve - almost everyone does - but falls due to forgetting to unclip at stops always happen, by definition, at zero mph, so only pride gets hurt. Unlike a horse, the bike won't go galloping off on its own, dragging its rider by a clipless pedal!
jyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-13, 06:50 PM   #11
miss kenton
Senior Member
 
miss kenton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Blueberry Capital of the WORLD, NJ
Bikes: Trek '09 1.5 wsd, Trek '13 Cocoa
Posts: 2,094
Hello Lioness, I got into cycling six years ago. I started with a cruiser, then a hybrid, and eventually went to a road bike when it was given to me. I can't advise you regarding the Cannondale as I don't know anything about them. I'm almost 5'9" so I can't tell about bikes for small women. I will say that the crossbar has never been an issue, and I've taken a few spills, including going over the handlebars.
As far as clipless pedals go, I feel the same way as you do. Depending on the type of riding you plan to do, you don't need to go clipless. I've been riding platforms with MTB shoes since I've been riding my road bike and have ridden distances of 75 and 80 miles with no issues. I have a pair, still in the box in my bike room, but have never felt inclined to put them on.
I agree with the other posters that a fat saddle won't be the most comfortable, but bike shorts for a woman are a must! I have found that the most expensive shorts are not necessarily the most comfortable.
(Lady Tip: Do NOT wear underwear with bike shorts. The seams and edges of the undies do damage to your body that you don't even want to think about.) Welcome to 50+! I am always happy to see other women post in this forum.
miss kenton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-13, 07:45 PM   #12
roccobike
Bike Junkie
 
roccobike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: South of Raleigh, North of New Hill, East of Harris Lake, NC
Bikes: Specialized Tarmac, Speialized Roubaix, Giant OCR-C, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR, Stumpjumper Comp, 88 & 92Nishiki Ariel, 01 Bianchi Campione, 87 Centurion Ironman, 92 Paramount
Posts: 9,437
Welcome to the forums. A mid 90's Cannondale is a good choice. Six years ago, when I moved from just mountain bikes to add on road biking, it was on a 96' SR500. The T-700 has a chromoly fork and that's good. Avoid bikes that have aluminum forks as they transmit road every bump through the bars to your arms. If you haven't already done so, buy some cycling gloves to help absorb road shock. You'll probably start off with a soft saddle, most folks returning to cycling do. Eventually, you'll want a firmer saddle, but that comes after everything hardens up. Good luck, and keep posting.
__________________
Roccobike BF Official Thread Terminator
roccobike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-13, 03:13 PM   #13
Lioness1961
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 5
Well, I bought it! $200 (can't believe it). It needs at least one new tire and pedals and most certainly a tuneup with perhaps some cabling replaced. But other than that, it is a clean, barely used bike.

Aside from a helmet and padded bicycling shorts, what else should I consider investing in? I'm rather excited--I am dropping the bike off tomorrow at my local bike shop for the needed repairs.
Lioness1961 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-13, 04:06 PM   #14
qcpmsame 
Semper Fi USMC
 
qcpmsame's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cantonment, FL
Bikes: 2012 CAAD 10 3 Ultegra, 1978 Medici Pro Strada
Posts: 9,110
Congratulations on the N+1, we need pics of the new bike. You got a good deal at $200 for a T700. Get yourself a good floor pump, a multi tool and a few bike specific tools and one of the many bike maintenance guides out. I keep Lennard Zinn's, Zen and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance, on my work bench for a reference, there are a lot of good ones out now. Park Tool Company's Big Blue Book is another one I have.

Hope you enjy the new bike, a first ride report would be nice if you would.

Bill
__________________
I can do all things through Christ, who strengthens me. Philippians 4:13

I did not choose to have Parkinson's Disease, but I can choose to not allow it to control my life. Its all up to me to overcome the trials, adapt and overcome!
qcpmsame is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-13, 04:30 PM   #15
davidad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 4,803
If it fits you will be happy with it. I feel that a tourer is a good choice for a first time adult rider. Later if you want to race you can put a set of racing wheels on it and get after it!
davidad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-13, 05:00 PM   #16
Lioness1961
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidad View Post
If it fits you will be happy with it. I feel that a tourer is a good choice for a first time adult rider. Later if you want to race you can put a set of racing wheels on it and get after it!
No racing here. Just want a decent starter bike so that I can start riding and hopefully go on some rides and tours with my significant other, who is a serious and avid touring cyclist. Mackinac Island is a potential destination next summer, and it would be nice to tour the island and be able to keep up with him.
Lioness1961 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-13, 07:17 PM   #17
TromboneAl
Senior Member
 
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Far, Far Northern California
Bikes: 1997 Specialized M2Pro
Posts: 2,875
Good strategy -- that's exactly what I would have done. My bike is a 1997, and I expect to have it for a long time.

I recommend buying a blinkie light for the rear, even for daytime riding -- it makes you noticeable. PlanetBike Superflash, or Cygolite 2 Watt. My wife likes her cycling gloves.

You'll want to have all the supplies for fixing a flat on the road (and learn how to do it), plus a floor pump for the garage.

Make sure your SO knows how to ride with a newby. He should ride at your pace (you go first), and he should frequently say things like "Hey, you look really good on a bicycle!" and "Wow, I'm impressed with you."
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-13, 02:51 AM   #18
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
Posts: 6,912
Great price - seriously!

What kind of pedals are you getting? You may start with platform pedals but I suggest you consider clipless pedals at some point. There are pedals with SPD bindings on one side and a platform on the other.

To get:
- Helmet. Plenty of vents is nice. They all have to pass the same impact tests to get certified, so $40 gets you as much protection as $200.
- Sunglasses (protect eyes from airborne stuff, and from sun)
- Flat repair kit (spare tube, tire levers, mini pump, patch kit - $40-ish) and learn how to change a tube.
- Underseat bag to hold above plus ID, keys, etc. $15-25. You can stuff this in a jersey pocket if you're going to wear a bike jersey, but a bag is more convenient.
- Red blinky light for seatpost or seatstay or helmet. $15-20.
- Sounds like you'll be going on fun rides rather than commuting etc, so maybe you don't need a lock - or can have SO carry the lock, better yet? If you do start locking your bike up and walking away, never trust a cable lock (very easily cut), get a decent U-lock. $40+.

When you get into touring, you will want a way to carry stuff, which usually means racks and panniers. But no need to get that stuff just yet.
jyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-13, 02:53 AM   #19
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
Posts: 6,912
Oh - post a pic of the bike - we like pictures and a T700 is a pretty machine.
jyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-13, 03:50 AM   #20
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO
Posts: 29,058
Internet photo.



You should have many happy miles on the bike.
I have 10,000 + miles on a T-One.
__________________
[SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI
10 Wheels is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-13, 11:25 AM   #21
sreten
Banned.
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brighton UK
Bikes: 20" Folder, Road Bike
Posts: 1,664
Hi,

Nice bike ! I'm a fan of fatter tyres on road bikes and have a
30mm near slick on the back and a 32mm with more tread
on the front, run with more pressure in the back.

Investigate your tyre options, can make a big difference.

The rear gives good rolling as it takes more of the weight,
the front gives great grip and more suspension than normal.

rgds, sreten.
sreten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-13, 02:52 PM   #22
CrankyFranky
Senior Member
 
CrankyFranky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Franko barada nikto
Bikes: Enough bikes...for today!
Posts: 1,103
Welcome, Lioness! The bike is a good choice at a great price! It might be good to check the stem and bars for proper fit. There's a few very good YouTube tutorials on adjusting the fit, if you have a friend to help you. You want to maximize the number of hand positions with which you are comfortable, even if it means swapping out a stem for a longer or shorter one.
One thing that I might mention along with all the previous good suggestions is that you should buy a good floor pump - preferably one with a gauge. Proper inflation to a pressure near the recommended maximum will make your ride very much more easy, and may make your ride more enjoyable - with the one caveat that this bike is a stiff one, so you might want to deflate ten or more pounds from the max to make the ride more comfortable. Every week or so, check the pressure and top up as necessary - air does leak out slowly, and the effort needed to go a certain speed will increase. Also, "pinch flats" can come from under-inflated tires.
The mini-pump is vital to have on the road, but it is less than ideal to use routinely. I think the latter type that many recommend is the Topeak Road Morph pump - you can get one with a gauge.
Do stop back here - it's a great group of people!
CrankyFranky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-13, 04:36 PM   #23
Lioness1961
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 5
My significant other was floored. He looked at the bike and was impressed with condition and purchase price. He also is developing a riding plan for us starting out with my neighborhood, then graduating to the bike paths until he is comfortable with me being out on the road. Works for me--he wants to make sure I am riding properly and have the bike adjusted to fit me before we start logging any road miles.

We took the bike to his regular local bike shop and it will receive a tune-up, new brake pads, cables and new tires. I'll still be well under my budget of $500! Bike shop said it was a great bike and it should give me many years of enjoyable riding.

Thanks everyone for the guidance and opinions. It is greatly appreciated, and I'm sure I will be coming back with more questions. I will have the bike in two weeks (they are really busy, and I am out of pocket all next weekend, so that works). I need to pick up a helmet and shoes--any recommendations?
Lioness1961 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-13, 04:57 PM   #24
qcpmsame 
Semper Fi USMC
 
qcpmsame's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cantonment, FL
Bikes: 2012 CAAD 10 3 Ultegra, 1978 Medici Pro Strada
Posts: 9,110
Now we will need a first ride report and pics of your choice of post ride PIE!!! Glad that the T700 is working out, I think you will enjoy it and the rides with your S.O., too.

Bill
__________________
I can do all things through Christ, who strengthens me. Philippians 4:13

I did not choose to have Parkinson's Disease, but I can choose to not allow it to control my life. Its all up to me to overcome the trials, adapt and overcome!
qcpmsame is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-13, 05:05 PM   #25
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Bikes: A lot of old bikes and a few new ones
Posts: 9,861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lioness1961 View Post
. . .
We took the bike to his regular local bike shop and it will receive a tune-up, new brake pads, cables and new tires. I'll still be well under my budget of $500! Bike shop said it was a great bike and it should give me many years of enjoyable riding.

Thanks everyone for the guidance and opinions. It is greatly appreciated, and I'm sure I will be coming back with more questions. I will have the bike in two weeks (they are really busy, and I am out of pocket all next weekend, so that works). I need to pick up a helmet and shoes--any recommendations?
Please consider giving your local bike shop some of your business and buy the helmet and shoes from them. You can find something for less money online but the shop will make sure that what you buy fits you.
bikemig is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:01 PM.