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Old 05-17-13, 01:59 PM   #1
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Great Opportunity to "Pay it Forward" to an 81yo Gentleman

After swimming this morning, I came home and decided to go for a fun, short ride. I had some regular shorts on, and jumped on the Lemond, and went about a mile when it occurred to me that those shorts were definitely NOT covering everything that needed to be covered. So, I circled home and changed to some proper bike bibs and went on my way. (This is all important because of the timing involved - if I had not taken the time to change, I would have missed this opportunity).

So, on the trail at the bridge, I saw 4 bicyclists, and as I approached 3 rode away, leaving one guy pushing a bike. His chain had come off and looked like a good imitation of a pretzel. The other guys were unable to fix it. He did not know the area and really had no clue where to go. He was about 10 miles from his car. He had no cell phone, no ID and no $$, no water, period. He rides regularly and looks in great shape for someone 81yo. But he never takes the CP, $$ or ID!!

We talked for awhile and it occurred to me that my wife was swimming at the rec center, a short distance away. We walked up to the rec center and I put the bikes in our van, and as soon as the wife was finished, we tooled off to my favorite LBS. He was worried about not having any money, but I know the LBS pretty well, and knew they would take care of him (Creekside Bikes, Parker, CO) with no charge.

So, they put the bike on the stand, straightened out the chain, made some minor adjustments, did a safety check on the bike, and I took him to the corner, showed him the trail and he was on his way.

So, he says he will carry a CP in the future - some of our trails are quite isolated and miles from civilization.

He was delightful, and we made a wonderful acquaintance, but I never got my ride in. That will have to be tomorrow.

Anyone else had an opportunity to "pay it forward" lately?

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Old 05-17-13, 03:26 PM   #2
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I can see that happening to me. So far the only thing I let behind was my water bottles. That wouldn't of been to bad if it wasn't 90+ degrees. I hope it doesn't get as bad as that guy you helped.
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Old 05-17-13, 03:40 PM   #3
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Wonder if he was as shocked but appreciative as the lady I pumped gas for a couple months ago was? She was obviously brand new at this crutch thing and was having trouble manipulating everything. Me? I've had lots of practice so it was no big deal.

But, helping is a regional thing I think. In the North Country it is a cardinal sin to not help any one you find on the side of the road. It is just part of the culture. As I travel I find that not to be the case everywhere and, to be frank, the culture is changing here too.
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Old 05-17-13, 03:57 PM   #4
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You did good.... to your question, mine has not so much been passing it forward but just helping people who need a little help fixing a bike OR people give me bikes to go on to other folks who need them...some of them go to a correctional facility with a bicycle fixin program with the bikes going to people who need them.
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Old 05-17-13, 04:04 PM   #5
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What's CP?
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Old 05-17-13, 04:11 PM   #6
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What's CP?
Cellphone, I assume.
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Old 05-17-13, 04:16 PM   #7
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What I found quite odd was the number of times other cyclists would call out to make sure I was OK when I was stopped at the roadside taking a break. Ironically the one time I did need some help (I'd got a flat and found my spare tube was faulty) nobody stopped, although one guy gave me a patch for my tube when I asked him if he knew where the nearest bike shop was. He wouldn't let me give him anything for his trouble.

As it happened a few days later I was walking in town and saw a guy with his bike upside down looking bothered, so I went over to see what his problem was. His chain had come off, and by the looks of it the chain had come off sufficiently vigorously to catch the pedal and end up looped around the wrong side of the cranks. It took me a little while to figure just how it was routed compared to how it was meant to be routed and get it back on the cranks. I didn't have bike tools with me so I showed the guy how he needed to avoid using his large chainring until he could get it seen to, and showed him which part would need adjusting by a bike shop.

Just as I was saying to my wife how I'd need to detour via the shopping centre so I could wash my hands a passing tradesman called to me and gave me a couple of hand wipes from his van to clean the grease of my hands. So it all worked out well.
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Old 05-17-13, 04:25 PM   #8
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I've never been quite the good samaritan you are Dnvr. I've only stopped to help folks who have a flat, no pump, and no patch kit or spare tube.
Kudos to you.
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Old 05-17-13, 05:36 PM   #9
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Have ridden as Bike Patrol (think of it as Ski Patrol, but on a bike) for decades here at many cycling events.
If someone's by the roadside we ask "everything OK?"
If not, we offer help. Majority of the time we are successful and end up making a new cycling acqaintance.
Never hurts to be nice/helpful!
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Old 05-17-13, 05:44 PM   #10
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I've lent tire levers, given away a tube or two, and let a guy use my Road Morph because he forgot to pack CO[sub]2[/sub].
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Old 05-17-13, 05:57 PM   #11
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I've never been quite the good samaritan you are Dnvr. I've only stopped to help folks who have a flat, no pump, and no patch kit or spare tube.
Kudos to you.
Heck, I really could not leave the guy there by himself - he had no one to call, etc., etc.

I suggested to him that Taxis were also available for the next time.
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Old 05-18-13, 09:59 AM   #12
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Last summer as I was nearing home from a ride on the bike path I came up to a young man on a mountain bike who was stopped and looking very puzzled with a tacoed wheel. He said he had gotten tangled up with an inline skater and crashed. Not only was the rear wheel badly bent but his saddle was broken. It turned out he had ridden the bus from a nearby town that required public transport to cross a river and was now pondering options of which there was only one; return home via the same bus. I commiserated with him for a few minutes and then another cyclist also stopped to see if he could help. The other cyclist had a spoke wrench and set to work right away to straighten the wheel.

Since there was nothing I could do, I wished the young guy good luck and continued to finish my ride. Within a few minutes I remembered I had another saddle I never used and since it was only a five minute ride to my house, I rode home to get it. By the time I returned, the second cyclist had the wheel true and with my donation of a saddle, they rode off together up the bike path.
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Old 05-18-13, 01:43 PM   #13
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A few years back, I was asked to marshal the 25mile course of a large charity bike ride out here on Long Island. Apparently, all the other marshals thought this was a RACE, so they shot out of the starting line like bats out of hell and finished the course before half the ride participants (most of them beginners or casual riders, at best) had reached the halfway point. This left me responsible for the safety of more than 500 cyclists by myself.

It was a good thing I was in my riding prime at the time, because with all the flat repairs, traffic direction, SAG calls, and lost rider searches I performed that day, I ended up riding the entire course at least four times. In the end, I found myself chugging along with the very last rider in the pack, an overweight, out-of-shape man of 67 years who had not been on a bike for at least the past thirty. His grandchildren had challenged him to make the full 25-mile ride and he was determined. Unfortunately, he had only brought one small bottle of Poland Spring water, which he chugged down in its entirety after the first three miles. After that, he refused to ask for water from the SAG van, which was nowhere to be found most of the ride, anyway. By the time I reached him, almost two hours into the event, he had gone only about fifteen miles and looked as if he were ready to bonk and smash his $49 Huffy into a road sign. I asked if he wanted to bail and he adamantly refused.

With ten miles left to go, you can imagine how much I learned from this guy, riding by his side at the ready to grab his shoulder if he were to suddenly collapse. After about five miles, with the SAG van MIA for quite some time, he finally agreed to let me buy him a couple of bottles of water at a gas station. I bought six and kept four in my pannier. I gave him the other two and he sucked them down like a grounded whale just returned to the ocean. We took a rest, followed by pedaling another half-mile or so, followed by another rest. Soon it became apparent that the SAG drivers had gone home to their BBQ's and wouldn't be coming around anymore. Shortly after that, my two-way radio communication with the organizers went dead. I later found out that the radio operators had gone home, instructing the organizers to mail them my radio when it was returned.

Meanwhile, I had to get my new buddy through the rest of the course, a mere four miles for me, but an insurmountable challenge for him. The temp was peaking in the 90's by now and I knew that continuing the ride with this red-faced, huffing and puffing grandpa was a dangerous proposition, but I didn't say that to HIM, as there was really no option. Oh, I forgot to mention that neither of us had a cell phone.

Two more miles we coasted along, stopping and starting, stopping and starting, stopping to buy water, starting again and stopping to buy water again. We were now almost four hours into the event and I knew I was going to be very late for a family gathering at my house. I got up all the gusto I could and started firing up the last remaining vestiges of my buddy's stamina with lines like "Just think of how you're gonna kick your grandson's ass when you cross that finish line!" He could barely muster up a smirk, though, and soon I just shut up and we continued to roll along in silence.

As we labored through the last two miles of the course, I asked a few times if he wanted me to go ahead and summon his family to come and get him, but he wouldn't let that happen. A part of me was glad, because I didn't feel comfortable leaving him on the road to die by himself. I also really wanted to see him finish the course. I'd say that last two miles took another hour or so, as he could barely pedal 100 feet without a rest and a huge chug of water. Riders from the 100-mile course must have still been crossing the finish line, as nobody seemed to be concerned that the last rider from the 25-miler hadn't made it back yet. Where the heck was this guy's family, anyway, and why weren't they out on the course looking for him by now?

Fast-forward: We finally made it to the last corner before the finish. I remembered from the previous year that the organizers made a big deal, cheering and carrying on whenever someone crossed the line, so I proposed a plan to my now ashen-faced buddy. "I'm going to lay back here and you go cross the finish line. When you get there, tell them you stayed behind to help the guy behind you (me) make it through the course. Then I'll come through a minute or two later and thank you in front of your family."

We did exactly that and then I went off to my car, put my bike in, and drove away, never to see the guy again. Today, I can't even remember his name, but whether or not he ever told his family the truth about the ride, I know they were really proud of him.
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Old 05-18-13, 01:57 PM   #14
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Since I ride a MUP mostly every day, the most help I have been is with fixing flats, giving a CO2 cartridge to someone who exhausted theirs or calling a ranger to take them back to their vehicle. There have been a few times that I actually stopped to render aid to a couple of riders involved in a crash, but not having any first aid supplies with me, the aid was mostly supportive until fire rescue arrived.
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Old 05-18-13, 03:52 PM   #15
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so I proposed a plan to my now ashen-faced buddy. "I'm going to lay back here and you go cross the finish line. When you get there, tell them you stayed behind to help the guy behind you (me) make it through the course. Then I'll come through a minute or two later and thank you in front of your family."

We did exactly that and then I went off to my car, put my bike in, and drove away, never to see the guy again. Today, I can't even remember his name, but whether or not he ever told his family the truth about the ride, I know they were really proud of him
A halo for you!!
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Old 05-18-13, 04:31 PM   #16
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Denver and Tom, you two exemplify what I love about cycling and the 50+ forum. Well done sirs, well done. Tom, I hope you read the other marshals the riot act for that stunt.

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Old 05-18-13, 07:37 PM   #17
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>>>>I hope you read the other marshals the riot act for that stunt.<<<<

Never saw them again, either!
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Old 05-19-13, 04:54 PM   #18
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Sometime ago I came upon a young boy walking his bike, head down, looking bummed out. I stopped and learned he had 5-10miles to walk and his dad was going to be really, really mad. I told him I could probably fix it and he said, "no, it's flat". I got him to agree to let me try and of course it was no big issue and I had it fixed in short order. He was jubilant. He had no idea such an amazing thing was even possible. I chuckled inwardly at his absolute astonishment that he was going to be able ride home. Best repair job I've ever done.
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Old 05-20-13, 09:33 AM   #19
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Papa Tom, that's an amazing story. You're a great guy. And the organizers of that ride were awful!
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Old 05-20-13, 10:02 PM   #20
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Last year, on a 600k brevet, we were about 50 miles from the end of the 400k loop that comprised essentially the first day of riding. The second loop was only 200k.

We had caught another rider, a female, who asked if she could ride with us. Of course - never an issue. We stopped at a truckstop and for some reason, she decided to have a hotdog. I didn't think it was wise but hey.... it's her stomach.

Sure enough, about 20 miles from that control, she said that she had to stop....and throw up. After 2 or 3 more incidents, she told us to go on.

No way - I'm not leaving any rider, male or female, 30 miles from the end, in the middle of the night, in rural Utah, sick. Staying with her cost me an hour of sleep but part of randonneuring is the camaraderie that riders develop.

Once we got back to that night's control, we went to our respective hotel rooms. After two restful hours of sleep, my riding buddy and I talked to the local RBA before we left and the RBA mentioned that she had withdrawn from the event. I was disappointed that she didn't finish the event but at least, she was safe!
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Old 05-21-13, 02:24 PM   #21
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K7baixo,

Sounds like good ol' fashion food poisoning. Sorry that happened to her, but hurrah for your Chivalry.
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Old 05-21-13, 03:24 PM   #22
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Karma is kind of a cool thing. The guy I stopped to help 5 years ago has since become my best friend. Makes me glad every day I stopped to help him
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Old 05-21-13, 04:37 PM   #23
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>>>I told him I could probably fix it and he said, "no, it's flat".<<<<

That line speaks volumes. So many cyclists, young and old, never truly understand what a flat is. To those of us who have fixed hundreds of them, it's a minor annoyance. To youngsters, like the boy in your story, it's the end of bicycling, forever. But put the two together, and a flat tire can be the beginning of a magical encounter that both people remember for the rest of their lives.
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Old 05-21-13, 06:01 PM   #24
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>>>I told him I could probably fix it and he said, "no, it's flat".<<<<

That line speaks volumes. So many cyclists, young and old, never truly understand what a flat is. To those of us who have fixed hundreds of them, it's a minor annoyance. To youngsters, like the boy in your story, it's the end of bicycling, forever. But put the two together, and a flat tire can be the beginning of a magical encounter that both people remember for the rest of their lives.
Nicely stated. You never know what a small gesture will mean to someone.
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Old 05-21-13, 06:37 PM   #25
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The last time I stopped to help a stranded cyclist, I sure got into more than I planned on, but it all worked out OK. A man, riding with his 12 year old daughter was on the side of the trail, looking like he had tried in vain for a long time to sort out a mechanical issue, and had given up. He was a long way from home, and had no one he could call to come and get him.
The issue was the chain jammed between the chain rings and bottom bracket, and I mean, twisted around, jammed in there tight. It was a newer, mid level full suspension mountain bike, so I didn't want to get too forceful with it as paint damage was likely.
Another cyclist, (a roadie) stopped almost at the same time as I did, and we kind of worked as a team to sort it out. The guy with the jammed chain was not equipped or knowledgeable in mechanical matters, but the other guy had a good assortment of tools, and I had my multi tool, so we went to work.
The one tool we really needed, neither of us had. The crank had a self extractor, and a 8mm hex key would have pulled the crank right off, and freed the chain.
But we were equipped to remove the chain rings from the crank, so that's what we did.
Freed the chain, inspected it for damage, put everything back together and got him on his way.
I didn't have my phone with me, and I was gone longer than I thought. My wife was going nuts worrying about where I was.
I often ride without my phone, but since then, I try to remember to grab it before I go out the door.
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