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  1. #1
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    After Hybrid What?

    Hello.
    When you returned to cycling did you start with a hybrid or has there been a hybrid in your 50+ experience?
    Have you gotten another bike since the hybrid?
    Would you tell a little of what and why?
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Gone DnvrFox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottogo
    Hello.
    When you returned to cycling did you start with a hybrid or has there been a hybrid in your 50+ experience?
    Have you gotten another bike since the hybrid?
    Would you tell a little of what and why?
    Thank you.
    No hybrid. Went from Mtn Bike w/slicks directly to road bike and then bought another road bike.

    Wife went from mtn bike to road bike, also, but she didn't like the road bike so we bought her a hybrid, which she doesn't like either, and it is presently her indoor trainer set up in the family room. Now she always rides the mtn bike, but may try the hybrid again in the future - she got some muscle cramps while riding it, but is not sure if the cramps are associated with the hybrid.
    Last edited by DnvrFox; 02-27-05 at 06:24 AM.
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  3. #3
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottogo
    Hello.
    When you returned to cycling did you start with a hybrid or has there been a hybrid in your 50+ experience?
    Have you gotten another bike since the hybrid?
    Would you tell a little of what and why?
    Thank you.
    I can see a reason for a Hybrid, but it is neither one nor the other. If you want to use it on the road, then it is a more comfortable bike for use for people of our age group, particularly if you are returning. If you are going to be be solely on the road, then a road bike is better, and they can be made more comfortable. For off road use, then a mountain bike is more suitable, even if it is only on the unmade cycle tracks that are springing up everywhere. Don't go for a full suspension one though unless you have plenty of money to spend on a good one. The cheaper ones are like a pogo stick. I would even suggest that a full rigid is appropriate, unless you are going off road. Even then, a good bike that costs will be preferable.

    I've laid out my thoughts, But I am a mountain biker that does go off road. A hybrid will not be suitable for my use, so I am biased.

    What sort of riding will you be doing?

  4. #4
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
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    I've never had a hybrid, but over the years, I've come to accept that I'm not a 25-year-old kid anymore. For me, that means raising the handlebars to deal with some back issues and getting a low granny or bailout gear. As suggested above, you can do this with a road bike. In fact, I've had the same road bike for 21 years. I've been able to make the above changes by switching out parts.
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  5. #5
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    Hey, I'm only 48yo. I ride mountain bikes and hybrids. I prefer the mountain bike off road, the hybrid is better on the road. My hybrid is not really a hybrid. It is called flat-bar road bike. One difference is rear dropout spacing (130 vs. 135) so it can take road wheels, I forget the rest. Look at bikes in this catagory, they are light, fast and put you in a more efficient position than a true hybrid, I love mine. If you plan to become a real biker, you don't want to be propped upright on a big stuffed saddle. The flat bars address the concern Blackberry raises about older backs, but not to the extent of "comfort" bikes. But it all comes down to what you want to do. If being comfortable is the primary goal, comfort bike might suit you. You won't go fast or very far (unless you have a long time), but you will get some fresh air and exercise. I would recommend a more performance oriented ride though. Fast hybrid like my Marin Mill Valley, road bike, or mountain bike and hit the trails. I hardly ever ride pavement for recreation, mountain biking is where it's at for me. Hmmm... If you can only have one bike maybe cyclocross? If I put knobbies on my marin it could go off road. I wandered into Rock Creek park once and was having a blast on road tires until I slipped and banged my knee on the handle bar.

    Ok, yes get a flat-bar road bike. It will go anywhere with only change of tires. Or a cyclocross bike, or a road bike with triple chainring, or hybrid, or mtb, ok?

  6. #6
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    Thank you.
    I'm interested to see if there is a general progression to certain other types of bicycles.
    Just curious.

  7. #7
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    Sure, I think most people here get nicer, more expensive bikes as they get more into cycling. Most riders will go for road or mountain bike depending on the type of riding they find they prefer. The other reponses indicate it is usually a roadie. I can't really speak for mature riders returning to the sport, I'm only 48 and never grew up. I'll let you know in 1 1/2 years, but I bet I'll still prefer the dirt trails to the paved ones when I'm 50.

  8. #8
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    I used to commute to work on an old mountain bike. When it got old and rusty from too many winters of salty slush, I replaced it with a hybrid. The hybrid was great for commuting, since it could still take knobbies and fenders. It was also more comfortable than the MTB. It was a little bit faster than the MTB it replaced, but still noticeably slower than my then-road bike.

    I've since gotten rid of my road bike, and picked up several recumbents. Like you, it started getting harder and harder to be comfortable on the road bike, or even on the hybrid. The hybrid is by far the slowest bike I own now. It's relegated to winter riding only, and short rides at that.

  9. #9
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qmsdc15
    Sure, I think most people here get nicer, more expensive bikes as they get more into cycling. Most riders will go for road or mountain bike depending on the type of riding they find they prefer. The other reponses indicate it is usually a roadie. I can't really speak for mature riders returning to the sport, I'm only 48 and never grew up. I'll let you know in 1 1/2 years, but I bet I'll still prefer the dirt trails to the paved ones when I'm 50.
    Once a mountain biker, you stay a mountain biker. I only contemplated turning into a roadie when I wanted to keep riding ,but do it easier. A lack of fitness after a couple of operations meant that I was getting slower up the hills, so my initial thought was cut out the hills. Did a road ride with the MTB on slicks and decided to get fitter instead. That was four years ago, and at 58, don't want to turn into a boring old slow roadie. I'd much rather get covered in mud, massage my back on the fast downhills, and get my heart rate way up on technical, steep off road climbs.

  10. #10
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    I'm fifty one and I have four bikes: a Dean Ti custom built road bike, a Trek 7000 mtb, an old Bianchi road touring set up, and a Giant OCR touring bike with Marzochi shocks and Rock Shox seatpost.

  11. #11
    Let's do a Century jppe's Avatar
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    When I started riding 4 yrs ago I purchased a Mountain Bike thinking it would be the most versatile as I could ride it both on and off the road and it would be all I ever needed. I found I enjoyed venturing away from home on the roads and discovering new areas around the community a lot more than riding trails. I replaced the knobbies with inverts to make riding on the roads more efficient and picked up my average speed by about 10%. In fact one of the last times I was riding off road on some trails I wound up going over the handlebars down a hill and decided I'd stick with taking my chances with the cars on roads as it looked like I was going to break my neck on the trails.

    About that time, one of my buddies called me at work and told me a local bike shop was going out of business had some nice road bikes at ridicously low prices. I wound up buying a pretty decent road bike for an incredible price and really enjoyed the even faster ride. Seems like I'm now averaging a new road bike every year as I'm on my third road bike as my last one had to be replaced because of some frame issues. After 12,000+ miles I'm still very interested in continuing to experiment to see how I can keep going further and faster!!

  12. #12
    Senior Member Terex's Avatar
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    I started riding canal/rail paths on a lower end front sus mtn bike that was really my "hybred". I'd ridden road years ago, but didn't want to ride the roads in NJ. After a couple of years, and venturing off-road, I invested in a high quality (Titus Racer-X) mtn. bike. I love it. But, over the last year, I just wasn't getting the conditioning from riding here and there, and decided to get a road bike to up the miles and level of conditioning. It's been love at second sight. I've been riding 1-2 times per weekend, and will be riding more when days get longer. Since Oct., I've gone from C clubs rides to B club rides, to riding with A riders. Really getting excited to up my level of conditioning. 50 mi. today felt like a breeze. (well, a cool one). I have to drive a ways to get out into the country, but on days like today - bluebird skys, rolling countryside, good people to ride with - it's certainly worth it.

  13. #13
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    We got back into riding 9 years ago because my company needed someone to fill the 50+ slot in a Corporate Challenge bike race. At the same time my wife for a b-day present asked for a bike to ride through the neighborhood. I bought her a new Trek hybrid. On our first ride together I was on a borrowed racing bike along side her hybrid. She was working really hard pedalling like crazy trying to keep up while I was coasting and occasionally turning the cranks. We took her hybrid back to the dealer who gave us full credit toward a road bike for her. Since then she has moved up to a full carbon racing bike, her 4th road bike, and participates in the Senior Olympics. And I have built my 4th road/racing bike, and have kept 3 of them.
    It all goes back to the 50's when I was a paperboy in the Ozarks. I hated hauling papers up those hills on heavy slow bikes. And I hated gravel roads. Now I ride light bikes on paved roads.

    Al
    Last edited by Al1943; 03-01-05 at 06:30 PM.

  14. #14
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    I"m pretty much the same as Al1943. Started road riding 20 years ago when my second car finally died and I decided to ride to work, only 6 miles away in DC. This was about 5 years before mountain biking became popular, and road bikes with drop handlebars were what every serious cyclist got. I've stayed a roadie. You can still go anywhere on a nice roadbike, faster and more efficiently than any other type of bike. You can put fenders on those with eyelets brazed on the drop outs, easy gearing with triple chainrings, and 25C tires for more comfortable riding over long distances.

    There's a new wrinkle in design technology called "comfort bikes" that just came out to address the recreational road bike market. Their designs are like the old touring bikes of the 70s, largely abandoned when mountain biking became popular, then hybrids appeared as an "all purpose" bike. The fact remains, roadbikes are superbly adapted to the roads. They're light, responsive, go fast, and are great fun over long distances, with advantages for aerobic conditioning and overall fitness. Hybrids are heavy, put too much weight on the seat, have handlebars that leave your wrists numb over long distances, and don't go very fast, or far, without alot of effort. Mountain bikes can be light weight, and with slick tires pretty fast, but they're undergeared for road riding, and present the flat handlebar, one hand position problem that hybrids do.

    The new "comfort" road bikes have drop handlebars mounted at about saddle height, so you don't have to hunker down to reach the bars and crane your neck to see, but can change hand positioning to avoid strained wrists, and stretch the back and upper body. These bikes aren't quite as light as true racing bikes, but they're more durable, with stronger wheels and stouter bars and frames, and they're at lower price points. Most of the ones I've seen have eyelets for rack and fenders. Their lightweight carbon and aluminum frames are tuned for resiliency and comfort, but they still handle efficiently like a racing bike.

    I work weekends at a local bike shop, and typically, older people want a true road bike about a year after they get fit riding a hybrid. These people might have skipped the hybrid if they knew the advantages of road bikes at the outset.
    Last edited by fredrico; 02-27-05 at 07:49 PM.

  15. #15
    Gone DnvrFox's Avatar
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    I work weekends at a local bike shop, and typically, older people want a true road bike about a year after they get fit riding a hybrid. These people might have skipped the hybrid if they knew the advantages of road bikes at the outset.
    But now, they have TWO bikes!
    Gone >> Gone >> Gone >> Gone >> Gone >> Gone >> Gone

  16. #16
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    So far it looks like people change road, mountain, recumbent in that order and within five years. Thanks. Keep it comin' if you're willing.

  17. #17
    horizontally adapted bentrox!'s Avatar
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    After hybrid what?
    Lowracer.
    Trust me.
    Biking will never be the same.
    I'll gently rise and I'll softly call
    Good night and joy be with you all.

  18. #18
    'Bent Brian
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    I went from road to recumbent. There was no looking back.

  19. #19
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    I started back at my 49th birthday with a walmart comfort bike $99 bucks.
    One year later I got a nice treck hybred. This year I just got a sun usx recumbent trike, and after only 87 miles I can ride alot longer than I ever could before, with no pain, and I see alot more sky ,birds, cliffs ,etc and alot less of the road in front of me. I am going slower in speed , but I see alot more stuff, and my enjoyment factor has gone through the roof.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarman
    I started back at my 49th birthday with a walmart comfort bike $99 bucks.
    One year later I got a nice treck hybred. This year I just got a sun usx recumbent trike, and after only 87 miles I can ride alot longer than I ever could before, with no pain, and I see alot more sky ,birds, cliffs ,etc and alot less of the road in front of me. I am going slower in speed , but I see alot more stuff, and my enjoyment factor has gone through the roof.
    Would you like to say a little about why you chose a trike over a two-wheeled bicycle or two-wheeled recumbent?

  21. #21
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    I live in a valley, and with the big hills, I thought it would be fun to climb the hills without having to think about my balance. Last year my wife was riding on the path, and a large dog barked and she fell. Her ribs hit the handlebar, and she hurt for several months. I really enjoy the stability of the trike. It is heavy at 65 lbs. I find I can still climb the big hills, although slower, but my max speed is much higher. My average is lower, but I still only have a few miles on the bike. I figure I will build up my bent muscles on it this year, and maybe next year go for a sporty tadpole type. When my dad visited last year we tried to ride, but his balance was poor, and I was afraid he would fall. That may also have played into my decision. I took my hogrider chopper bike and put a trike kit on it. That makes for a pretty cheap trike. That is what I ride when my wife rides my usx.(that is the only bike she will ride now). So I guess we are a delta trike family, and I am looking forward to a fun year of riding.

  22. #22
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    I have four classic road bikes and an old school mountain bike. To reduce the chance of taking a spill, I ride either the mountain bike or the Peugeot UO-8 (27x1-3/8" tyres) when road, traffic, and/or weather (including wind) conditions are less than ideal. The Bianchi is an absolute blast to ride, but it is strictly a fair-weather friend, and I find it a bit spooky or twitchy in a strong crosswind, which probably says more about my abysmal physical coordination than about the bike itself. As I get older, I do find myself riding the Bianchi less and the other bikes more.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarman
    I live in a valley, and with the big hills, I thought it would be fun to climb the hills without having to think about my balance. Last year my wife was riding on the path, and a large dog barked and she fell. Her ribs hit the handlebar, and she hurt for several months. I really enjoy the stability of the trike. It is heavy at 65 lbs. I find I can still climb the big hills, although slower, but my max speed is much higher. My average is lower, but I still only have a few miles on the bike. I figure I will build up my bent muscles on it this year, and maybe next year go for a sporty tadpole type. When my dad visited last year we tried to ride, but his balance was poor, and I was afraid he would fall. That may also have played into my decision. I took my hogrider chopper bike and put a trike kit on it. That makes for a pretty cheap trike. That is what I ride when my wife rides my usx.(that is the only bike she will ride now). So I guess we are a delta trike family, and I am looking forward to a fun year of riding.

    Thank you for your response.

  24. #24
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    When I started back in biking, I bought a "holdover" comfort bike in 2000. I thought it was good, but it went to college with one of my boys. Went and bought a Trek 7500 Hybrid, also a model year hold over form 2002. Like letting the dealer take the first year depreciation, and loved it. Suspension seat and forks, but the bontregar select wheels and tires and higher gearing made it soooo much faster and more fun to ride. I was concerned about my weight on those low spoke count wheels. I weigh a "round" 260. Bought both from a good dealer and he assured me no problems with holding my weight, and he has been right so far. Now that one is in college also, I have a really well educated pair of bikes and none to ride. Now I am in lust with a sweet looking trio of Italians. Bianchi Velope, Axis, and Brava. Deciding is a great winter sport; I'm thinking the Velope. However, there is this siren in the Trek store, 7700fx and I hear its song with those sexy carbon fiber forks and rear stays. Ah, to dream.

  25. #25
    Jim Shapiro
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottogo
    Hello.
    When you returned to cycling did you start with a hybrid or has there been a hybrid in your 50+ experience?
    Have you gotten another bike since the hybrid?
    Would you tell a little of what and why?
    Thank you.
    Save for high school and my undergraduate college years, I have been bicycling since I learned (in 1945), and that's a lot of years and quite a few bicycles. Right now I own 7 bikes including road, cyclocross, touring, and mountain models. However, given the choice, I almost always choose a fixed-gear bike I built up. I get plenty of exercise in a short time (no coasting) and hills are challenging, both up and down. Oh, and maintenance is minimal with no derailleurs.

    Admittedly it takes some getting used to, but once you try a "fixie" you just may get hooked like I did.

    Jim

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