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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    a little vintage

    My classic 34 yr old Schwinn has the original brakes-calipers and levers.I'm thinking I should replace them.They work fine but I'm concerned about metal fatigue and having one of them fall apart when I need them.If anyone had this happen please advise I'll replace them ASAP.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Ask in C+V and see what that group says.

  3. #3
    Ding! Bandera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamrock View Post
    They work fine but I'm concerned about metal fatigue and having one of them fall apart when I need them.
    "Metal fatigue" worry?
    I worry about asteroid strikes.

    Check that all the fittings are properly adjusted, tightened and lubed.
    Fit fresh well lubed cables & housing & brake pads, hoods as necessary and proceed.

    -Bandera
    '74 Raleigh International - '77 Trek TX900FG - '92 Vitus 979 - '10 Merckx EMX-3- '11 Soma Stanyan

  4. #4
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Both of my 50-year-old Austrian road bikes sport their original Swiss centerpull brake calipers. Make sure your pivots are in good shape. Replacing the brake pads with KoolStops and possibly replacing the cables and housings will improve braking effectiveness, as will replacing the brake handles with aeros, which offer 10% greater leverage (and therefore require 10% more travel, which is generally not a problem if your wheels are true and your brake pads are set close enough to the rims).
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  5. #5
    Trek 500 Kid Zinger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
    "Metal fatigue" worry?
    I worry about asteroid strikes.

    Check that all the fittings are properly adjusted, tightened and lubed.
    Fit fresh well lubed cables & housing & brake pads, hoods as necessary and proceed.

    -Bandera
    Lol

    ^^^What he says.

    That '79 Le Tour hasn't got quite the quality frame tubing that they started coming out with in the early '80s so I wouldn't sink too much $$ into it. That's a nearly 30 lb bike with 18 gauge 1020 carbon steel tubing. The later ones had Tange 4140 double butted tubing (the 3rd number is carbon content) and were as good as their motor. It's more valuable with the original stuff so at least keep that around if you change it.

    edit:

    I'll bet that bottom bracket, hubs and pedals could use some new bearing balls and white lithium grease if you haven't already.
    Last edited by Zinger; 09-01-13 at 05:46 PM.
    "I never lost a race because my bike was too heavy".......George Mount

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