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  1. #26
    Senior Member DGlenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velo Dog View Post
    Twenty years ago, when I was still sort of puzzling out how to remove my rear wheel, I read a review that said, "All tubes suck, but Continentals suck less than others." Nearly 40,000 miles later, I haven't seen anything to disprove that.
    Re Slime tubes, I just don't use them anymore. I didn't seem to have fewer flats, and when the Slime leaks out, it's hard to clean it off so patches will stick.
    Quote Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
    I wont buy Bontrager Race Lite's anymore. Yes, a nice savings in weight to be tempting but not durable from season to season....which is probably beyond the design intent.
    I agree.

    I only use light tubes, 23mm tires, and ride at a full 120 psi front and back. (For "performance" riding, I'm happy to sacrifice a bit of comfort in favor of reduced rolling resistance and crisp handling.)

    I started out by the using various Bontragers my LBS sold me. I wasn't happy - and tried Kenda. Not happy. I went with a few latex tubes as well - very expensive, and I found them to be unreliable and had some spectacularly loud blowouts.

    Then I went to Continental. Happy! They're fairly light - if not the lightest - but they seem to be more puncture resistant, and they lose less air between rides than all of the others I've tried.
    Regards,
    Duncan

  2. #27
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    When I started riding recumbents I also started using Schwalbe inner tubes. My new unscientific opinion is they retain air pressure for longer. Now I only top off my tires every couple of weeks or so. In the interest of full disclosure, at the same time I've also switched to using fatter tires with lower air pressures so that may be another significant factor.
    Yep - I only top off my mtn bike tires every couple of weeks (80 psi), while the road bikes every other day or so (120 psi), depending on riding frequency. Generally before any ride.
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  3. #28
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DGlenday View Post
    I agree.

    I only use light tubes, 23mm tires, and ride at a full 120 psi front and back. (For "performance" riding, I'm happy to sacrifice a bit of comfort in favor of reduced rolling resistance and crisp handling.)

    I started out by the using various Bontragers my LBS sold me. I wasn't happy - and tried Kenda. Not happy. I went with a few latex tubes as well - very expensive, and I found them to be unreliable and had some spectacularly loud blowouts.

    Then I went to Continental. Happy! They're fairly light - if not the lightest - but they seem to be more puncture resistant, and they lose less air between rides than all of the others I've tried.
    Is there a "model name" i.e., race or lite designation or is this their basic 19-23mm offering? When hefting the difference in those two Bontager tubes I was amazed at the noticeable differences.
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

    '85 Trek 460 road racer

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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by groth View Post
    I meant presta, but I think you're right - I was confused. However, you still have to have overpressure to get air into the tube and with some tubes you just need a lot more overpressure.

    - Ed
    I can get air into a presta tube simply by blowing into it. Doesn't seem to take very much pressure.

  5. #30
    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyb View Post
    I can get air into a presta tube simply by blowing into it. Doesn't seem to take very much pressure.
    It does if they tire has 100 lbs already. Then one would need over 100 to get pressure up to - say - 120 psi
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  6. #31
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
    It does if they tire has 100 lbs already. Then one would need over 100 to get pressure up to - say - 120 psi
    Yes, but that has nothing to do with the tube, just the air inside it.

  7. #32
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyb View Post
    I can get air into a presta tube simply by blowing into it. Doesn't seem to take very much pressure.
    Can I watch?
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

    '85 Trek 460 road racer

    '89 Raleigh Technium PRE

    '79 Motobecane Super Mirage

  8. #33
    Senior Member DGlenday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
    Is there a "model name" i.e., race or lite designation or is this their basic 19-23mm offering? When hefting the difference in those two Bontager tubes I was amazed at the noticeable differences.
    It's called a "Conti Race Tube", and the box looks like this:



    Hope that helps...
    Regards,
    Duncan

  9. #34
    Senior Member OldsCOOL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DGlenday View Post
    It's called a "Conti Race Tube", and the box looks like this:



    Hope that helps...
    thanx!
    Having a flat tire as part of the total cycling experience is highly overrated. Knowing how to fix one quickly is not.

    '85 Trek 460 road racer

    '89 Raleigh Technium PRE

    '79 Motobecane Super Mirage

  10. #35
    Senior Member Road Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
    Lighter weight tubes lose air more quickly. I don't like pumping all the time so I like heavier/thicker tubes. Weight weenies use latex tubes and pump before every ride.
    I bought a handful of Performance Lunar Light tubes a few years ago. Butyl, but none lasted more than a few rides before either puncturing or failing at the valve. It may be that performance sources their tubes the same place everyone else does, but I still won't buy their tubes. Good results with Michelin Airstops so far.

  11. #36
    Senior Member mkane77g's Avatar
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    There all Made in China or Indonesia but at least we have a choice on threaded/not threaded.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
    Can I watch?
    Sure, when you are out on the road with C02 I blow into the tube just to round it out a bit before installing it. Sounds kinky, but effective.

  13. #38
    Avid Cyclist MickeyMaguire's Avatar
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    I went to Dick's Sporting Goods and bought the threaded valve tubes that they had on the shelf... Sunlite. I have not had any issues with them whatsoever. The cheap tubes that come factory issue with Fuji bikes are pretty junky. My wife and I have been riding on the Sunlites a lot.
    If you can't do great things, do small things in a great way. ~Napoleon Hill
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  14. #39
    Senior Member David Bierbaum's Avatar
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    The Bell tubes I bought from Wal-Mart work just fine, except for the above-mentioned valve-stick problem, which seems to get better with age and use. Those Specialized tubes seem to get flats if you look at them too sharply. I'm of the "cheap tubes and plenty of 'em" school of thought, since I pinch pennies until they squeak piteously...

  15. #40
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyb View Post
    I can get air into a presta tube simply by blowing into it. Doesn't seem to take very much pressure.
    Me too but it's hard to do with the tire installed on the rim.

  16. #41
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    thorn resistant .. heavier, but they hold air longer.. because of being thicker ..


    the brand on the tube and on the box is often an imprint by the factory

    for the importing distributor they are selling to.. though the old european brands Michelin , Continental ,

    and more recently Schwalbe , may have different resources from their supplying companies .

  17. #42
    Senior Member
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    have been running Michelin airstops with no problems yet

  18. #43
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    they are just about all made in china and they are all crap, if get one not defective you are lucky

  19. #44
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    Not much love here for Specialized tubes. I've been riding them for years with good luck, and I just got my first flat in around 600 miles on this set.

    The tubes I'll never use again are Nashbar house brand tubes.

  20. #45
    Senior Member Bikey Mikey's Avatar
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    Again, I use Specialized tubes and not had a problem. In fact, I've gone thousands of miles on them without a flat. What is it that people are finding with specialized tubes? I'd like to know.
    Please support diabetics like myself, a red rider, by supporting the American Diabetes Association.
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  21. #46
    Erect member since 1953 cccorlew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biker395 View Post
    Thanks for the tip!

    Never had the problem with the blowoff ... hmmm. Just your footpump, or your hand pump too?
    I'm not sure about my frame pumps, but both my garage pump and office pump hate smooth stems. I even tossed in a new rebuild kit with the stem grabbing rubber (it must have a better name than that...) and it didn't help. I've considered buying a new pump, or at least pump head.
    WANTED: Not a darn thing. I've got it all. Life is good.
    Website at curtis.corlew.com Bicycle blog at ccorlew.blogspot.com

  22. #47
    Erect member since 1953 cccorlew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikey Mikey View Post
    Again, I use Specialized tubes and not had a problem. In fact, I've gone thousands of miles on them without a flat. What is it that people are finding with specialized tubes? I'd like to know.

    I think it depends on where you ride. In beautiful Antioch we have so much glass on the street I rarely wear through a tire before it's too cut up to be safe. Combine the glass with the thorns and lots of flats happen, no matter the tire or tube. When we leave the area and tour Washington, Oregon, Idaho or Montana, flats are rare to the point of being downright unusual.
    WANTED: Not a darn thing. I've got it all. Life is good.
    Website at curtis.corlew.com Bicycle blog at ccorlew.blogspot.com

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
    It does if they tire has 100 lbs already. Then one would need over 100 to get pressure up to - say - 120 psi
    which is the case with ANY kind of valve. With Shrader valves, it's air pressure plus spring pressure. With Presta you only have to overcome the air pressure.

    EIther way, I ride tubulars now and get 1/6th the flats and have to pump them up every week but not every ride like I did with clinchers and tubes.

    j.

  24. #49
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    Brand name doesn't seem to make much difference

    Don't put all of the blame on the tube. It may be the tire as well. It is very unlikely you will get a blowout from a properly inflated tube in an undamaged tire unless you don't seat the tire correctly. If you manage to get part of the tube between the rim and the tire you can damage the tire bead and probably will cause the tube to rupture. Once messed up, a tire with a damaged bead will just lift off every time you replace the tube and re-inflate the tire. You can find inexpensive tough tires that are pretty flat resistant. It takes some experimentation to find one that works for you.

    I recently bought a batch of 20 inch and 700C presta tubes from Niagara Cycle and chose several different brands to see if there was much difference between them. I bought Sunlite, Qtubes, and XLC. I also have boxes from Nashbar, Kenda, and Continental. The only brand stamped "Made In China" is Sunlite. All the rest are made in Taiwan. The sunlight tubes are good quality. The brand of tube that I had a problem with recently is a Kenda tube that leaked at the base of the presta valve. None has been defective coming out of the box. The most expensive tube was $3.73 (Qtubes) and the least expensive was $2.92 (Sunlight). Prices vary by the size of the tube of course. My LBS probably charges $7 for similar tubes. I wouldn't buy tubes at places like Walmart because they are so HEAVY. Most were filled with slime which I absolutely abhor. I do have to inflate the 20" tires every few days but that is preferable to using a heavy tube.

  25. #50
    Senior Member David Bierbaum's Avatar
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    I think (without proof or documentation) that with the lower quality presta valve-stems, it's not the spring, but the airtight seal, which can be a bit too tight for free travel of the stem, which causes the sticking at the beginning of each pump.

    Glass, goatheads, and steel-belt-fragments, conspired to do in both Specialized tubes within two months or so. The Sunlite and Bell tubes are both going strong after several months of regularly riding the debris field that is our local road shoulders...

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