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Old 12-03-13, 07:32 AM   #1
johnpitts01
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Tubeless

I know this probably aint the place for this thread.

BUT

I want to go tubeless and would like some clear concise advice and instructions from someone that's made the switch.

Thanks in advance

John
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Old 12-03-13, 07:53 AM   #2
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I'm running 28mm Hutchinson Sector tires on Velocity rims. These are not tubeless-specific rims, but my LBS used (obviously) the special rim tape. I love this setup. No problems in 3-4 months, lower pressures (I'm 195 lbs and run 85/90 F/R), much improved ride. I've added additional latex sealer one time as my LBS advice is to add 1 oz/tire monthly during the summer. The tires loose 3-4 psi overnight, but it has always been my habit to pump tires up prior to every ride.

I understand Schwalbe is coming out with a 28mm road tire which may have an even better ride. Bought my spare for $80. This is 2X what I pay for my Conti GP 4 Seasons (from Wiggle), but I'd expect those prices to come down. Even if the tires remain "expensive" the benefit is substantial.

I do a reasonable amount of climbing for an old guy and the descents are steep. One of the advantages of tubeless is the ability to sustain a puncture without a catastrophic deflation.

Regarding instructions: if you're going to convert existing wheels I would have an experienced LBS handle it the first time. I don't believe it's rocket science, but why not spend a few bucks and get it done right the first time?
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Old 12-03-13, 10:35 AM   #3
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I've been on two group rides recently where road tubeless tires had mysterious flats. Another rider had a fresh tube tire and tube to replace the tubeless. It was a little messy trading out the tire, but not too bad. Probably the sealant had gotten old.
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Old 12-03-13, 04:36 PM   #4
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Go to tubeless tubulars. Less aggravation and mess and works great.

J.
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Old 12-03-13, 07:15 PM   #5
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Road or MTB?
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Old 12-03-13, 07:57 PM   #6
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Last November I had my RS80's converted with Bontrager R3's and relaced them a month or so ago without 1 flat. That was 4300 miles . I'm sold.
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Old 12-04-13, 06:38 AM   #7
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Road bike.

Is it required to use specific tubeless tires?
I'd hoped and assumed that it would be possible to carry a tube only so that if there is a puncture/hole that the sealant can't plug it would be simple to just put the tube in the tire to get home.
If going tubeless requires a tubeless specific tire that cant have a tube installed for emergencies then I need to rethink this.

I'm likely to have my LBS do it. Will ask them today.
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Old 12-04-13, 06:50 AM   #8
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You must use tubeless specific tires. Regular tires run the risk of blowing off the rim. You can install a tube in a tubeless tire, but its messy with the sealant in the tire. I carry a tube for emergencies, but have never had to use it in three years.
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Old 12-04-13, 07:54 AM   #9
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If you're used to high quality performance tires with a fast ride and quick cornering, tubeless are a disappointment. However if you want comfort and relatively hassle free riding, tubeless are a good choice.
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Old 12-04-13, 12:01 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by johnpitts01 View Post
I know this probably aint the place for this thread.

BUT

I want to go tubeless and would like some clear concise advice and instructions from someone that's made the switch.

Thanks in advance

John
I've debated going tubeless several times myself. Why are you looking to go tubeless? (as others have mentioned it does require a tubeless specific tire)
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Old 12-04-13, 03:02 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by [B
jppe[/B];16300478]I've debated going tubeless several times myself. Why are you looking to go tubeless? (as others have mentioned it does require a tubeless specific tire)
Yes jppe, I too have debated going tubeless and I seem to review the debate about once a year but have yet to do it. My Big Reason is that the mess with the sealant is not only messy on installation, but has to be re-messed-with twice a year. Or maybe they've improved the messy bit and it's good for a lot longer now?

For me, and in a road context, the hassle still outweighs the benefits. I get very few flats but if I were more flat-prone I may have had to reverse my decision.

I think the debate is not yet over!

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Old 12-04-13, 03:46 PM   #12
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Done right tubeless is not terrible messy, if at all. But doing it right takes appropriate tires & rims plus a source of rapid inflation. Going flat on the road can be messy, unless it's due to dried up sealant, which is the most likely cause. Then it's just like fixing any flat on a tire that's incredibly tight fitting onto the rim.
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Old 12-05-13, 10:43 AM   #13
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My primary reason for going tubeless is that the folks I know that have done it report that they have gone "years without a flat".
I get a flat at least once a month.

I'm a B+ rider trying to move up to A.
But the primary reason for riding is the cardio and enjoyment of the outdoors.

Changing a tube at the roadside during the warm months is not such a big deal. But when it gets cold I hate hate hate changing a tube. Cold fingers and the inevitable chill would make me consider tubeless.

I might even consider two sets of wheels - tubeless alloy rims for cold weather / winter riding and clincher carbon wheels for warmer weather.

Gonna discuss with my LBS in the coming days. If rheir response is "Oh yeah you should go tubeless we've done lots of conversions" then I am in. If they hesitate or discourage then I will need to consider further....

Further comment and discussion on this topic is welcome.



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I've debated going tubeless several times myself. Why are you looking to go tubeless? (as others have mentioned it does require a tubeless specific tire)
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Old 12-05-13, 10:53 AM   #14
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I've gone in a little bit different direction. All my bikes have tubeless rims, (D/A 7900, Ultegra 6700 and Ultegra 6800). In all cases, I've gone to hardcase tires, with normal tubes; that seem to have solved my flat issues, (so far - been over a year now since my last flat).
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Old 12-05-13, 12:31 PM   #15
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I'm not sure about road tubeless. Not terribly tempted at the moment. It's not that I'm intimidated by the unknown as there's 6 bikes in the garage currently with tubeless set-ups, but they are mountain bikes. Some are legit, others ghetto.

All of them (2 ea. wife, son and myself) have benefited to a huge degree from the conversion. Flats don't happen, period. Tire pressures can be stupid low for increased traction w/o pinch flatting (more dented rims is the unfortunate byproduct..), spines and thorns are a non-issue, and, in the case of the mid-fatbike, the weight savings are substantial. But I do go through a quart of Stan's every month during the warmer times, and often break open the bead just to check the sealant level. No, that stuff doesn't last half a year around here!

It's more work and money than tubes, but worth it for MTB.

On the road bike, however, I don't get too many flats and the ability to lower the pressure is not something I personally feel a need for. My non-tubeless wheels are relatively high-end and not due for replacement. I'll wait.

Last edited by jan nikolajsen; 12-05-13 at 01:34 PM.
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Old 12-05-13, 12:36 PM   #16
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Go to tubeless tubulars. Less aggravation and mess and works great.
http://www.tufo.com/products/
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Old 12-05-13, 04:01 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpitts01 View Post
My primary reason for going tubeless is that the folks I know that have done it report that they have gone "years without a flat".
I get a flat at least once a month.

I'm a B+ rider trying to move up to A.
But the primary reason for riding is the cardio and enjoyment of the outdoors.

Changing a tube at the roadside during the warm months is not such a big deal. But when it gets cold I hate hate hate changing a tube. Cold fingers and the inevitable chill would make me consider tubeless.

I might even consider two sets of wheels - tubeless alloy rims for cold weather / winter riding and clincher carbon wheels for warmer weather.

Gonna discuss with my LBS in the coming days. If rheir response is "Oh yeah you should go tubeless we've done lots of conversions" then I am in. If they hesitate or discourage then I will need to consider further....

Further comment and discussion on this topic is welcome.
Makes sense. I assume the cause of the flats are tire & tube punctures as opposed to pinched tubes?
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Old 12-06-13, 09:11 AM   #18
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Arrggghhh. The confusion continues....

Tubeless tubulars?!?!
Went to the website. Seems an interesting solution.
Do I understand correctly the sealant is used ONLY when a puncture flat occurs?
Have you ridden one of these flat or used the sealant repair?

My flats are all puncture flats. No pinch flats. Always some very small pinhole. Tubeless or sealant would probably solve most of my problems.
Should I just try slime?

Will consult with the local LBS.

Thanks to all for the replies.
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Old 12-06-13, 06:10 PM   #19
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Made the move in 2008. Never looked back.
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Old 12-07-13, 08:10 AM   #20
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Made the move to...

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Originally Posted by mkane77g View Post
Made the move in 2008. Never looked back.
What exactly did you make the move to???

Can you tell me exactly what you are running on your bike - rims and tires?
And what do you carry / what are you prepared for in the event of a major puncture on the road?


Thanks

John
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Old 12-07-13, 08:56 AM   #21
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Dura Ace tubeless ready wheels,Hutcinson Intensive tires. First flat was 3 weeks ago. More like a blowout. Took a large boot to cover the 1" gash. 35lbs and rode home 25miles. I always carry a boot and a tube.
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Old 12-07-13, 09:18 AM   #22
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I took at look at these. I ride and tour on a tandem with rim brakes. Having had a few tires blow off the rims, I'm interested in anything that will keep that from happening. I googled for reviews, which were mostly positive about the quality of the tires and their handling. However, the road experiences with flats kind of turned me off. One little 2mm cut and one has to throw the tire away, even walk back if one hasn't brought another tire. One can't boot them. Of course I don't know if one could boot a regular tubeless, what with the slime to prevent a patch from sticking on the inside.
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Old 12-07-13, 02:07 PM   #23
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I don't know if one could boot a regular tubeless, what with the slime to prevent a patch from sticking on the inside.
Tubeless tires do not use slime (the green heavy high viscosity stuff). The sealant is milky white, thin and easily removed from the inside of the tire to prepare for a glue and boot/patch.
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Old 12-07-13, 04:37 PM   #24
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This is the Bontrager R3 with 4000+ miles on it .I had to deflate the tire when I noticed this in the garage to change it. My other wheelset is a DT swiss 465 with Bontrager R2's.
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Old 12-07-13, 09:49 PM   #25
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Tubeless tires do not use slime (the green heavy high viscosity stuff). The sealant is milky white, thin and easily removed from the inside of the tire to prepare for a glue and boot/patch.
Thank you. Yes, I've noticed that flatted tubeless tires, when taken off, have some white stringy sealant along the bead and pretty much nowhere else. So then how is a tubeless tire supposed to provide any anti-flatting benefit, other than no pinch flats, which no one who knows what they're doing gets anyway.

I assumed because of these no-flats claims, that the tires I was seeing had flatted because their sealant had hardened through owner neglect and wasn't supposed to be that way. That's not so? They're supposed to be this way? So then, how does that work? I can see I need some education about this tubeless business.
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