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-   -   Ye 42, bring unto me your tale of suffering. (http://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plus-50/928319-ye-42-bring-unto-me-your-tale-suffering.html)

Zinger 01-04-14 07:02 PM

Don't know what kinds of hills you deal with out in bluegrass country but, yeah, hills make the difference between a suffer-fest and a fun century ride. I'm just trying to get back into a relatively faster flat century this year and then take on a hillier one next year. Since I don't have a cycle computer, Carmichael's book probably wouldn't be useful but I'm hoping my winter dumbbell routine will help my knees for the hills.

And I'm trying to work around an even more restrictive time schedule than the OP since I work the second shift. So I'll have to make my short Wednesday ride an interval one rather than just pushing a heavier gear than I do on my weekends. Hoping the squats and intervals allow me a to maintain a little more power on my longer rides.

Also will have the luxury of sub 40 gear inches on my old bike this year with a new gearing setup. We'll see how that helps on the hills. Plan to be be using this winter's build for my flatter Wednesday wind-sprint rides.

If I try to get too ambitious too fast, after the decade layoff and on limited time, it kinda takes the fun out of it as well as risking overdoing it.

Zinger 01-04-14 07:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy (Post 16382432)
Be careful of your training state, Dudelsack. The veteran of many an ambitious training program, I find that these books are written either for children or the talented. It's so easy to overcook it.

Very wise advice right there.

Dudelsack 01-04-14 07:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by osteoclast (Post 16382302)

I presume you are doing this for fun rather than actually prepping for a century. It is an 11 week course where you are peaking your fitness by the end of it.

Best,

Gordon

Yeah, there's a major century ride I'm aiming for in April.

I'd also like to think I can generate a field test over 157W.

But ultimately this my true motivation:


Zinger 01-04-14 08:25 PM

^^^^^
Their women are sometimes still passing me for now.

climberguy 01-05-14 08:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dudelsack (Post 16382194)
It was the best of times. It was the worst of times.

But overall it just kind of sucked.

On test period 1 my averages were 154W and 155BPM. I felt pretty shot, and didn't hope for much on test period 2.

For test 2 my averages were 157W and 155BPM, and the power curve was much more consistent.

If a T. Rex were chasing me I'm sure I could have squeezed out a few more watts, but frankly not many more.

That gives me a FTP of 141W. Pitiful, but it is what it is.

Next session is Monday AM.

I am grateful this is an indoors program. Monday the projected high will be -5F.

Well, at least now you know where you are, fitness-wise. If you can stick with the program, it will be interesting to see your test results at the end of it. Good luck.

Dudelsack 01-05-14 12:17 PM

My pleas that I shouldn't have to help take down Xmas decorations because today is a rest day fell on deaf ears :lol:

Tomorrow the schedule calls for 45 minutes at around 80W, which won't feel like much, but Tuesday calls for several higher intensity intervals. I've also had half my Monday morning schedule cancel because of Icemeggedon (N+1) in the AM. Should be an interesting day.

Zinger 01-05-14 07:19 PM

Chris Carmichael
The Ultimate ride

Avoiding Over Training

Basically I try to do this by pretty much keeping it fun including the hard work. But as someone who has set myself back before, I'd say it's important to know the early signs so that your recovery/set-back time from over training will be shorter.

Everyone is a little different in this regard including top athletes. Some times you might want to modify someone else's program to fit your recovery needs as you become more familiar with yourself in this regard. And if you're intent on a rigorous routine, sometimes you have to cross the line of overdoing it just to find out where your limits are.

Dudelsack 01-05-14 07:35 PM

Good point. I thought that was why I did the field test. My "endurance ride" involves so little wattage, some of you could probably do it in your sleep.

Zinger 01-05-14 08:28 PM

Maybe it's actually best that I don't know what a watt is or how many I put out. It would probably cause deep depression and over training if I did.

Artkansas 01-05-14 09:08 PM

Volts * Watts = Amps

Dudelsack 01-06-14 06:14 AM

Featured video.


Format: some guy's training ride in Mallorca.
Cinematography: C-. Better quality with my Go Pro.
Soundtrack:B-. Eurotrash meets disco fury.
Distraction value: C-. Counted down the seconds the entire ride.

Overall: C-. I gave them a thumbs up. I give almost everyone a thumbs up on YouTube.

Dudelsack 01-06-14 06:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zinger (Post 16385702)
Maybe it's actually best that I don't know what a watt is or how many I put out. It would probably cause deep depression and over training if I did.

For non engineers, and apologies to the ones out there:
Watt: momentary measure of power, like how much you're putting out right this instant.
Joules: how much work (moving stuff from point a to point b) you do when you stack all the watts together.
kJoules: how much work we cyclists generate.
Calories: how much energy it takes to do the work.
Interestingly, we generate far more heat than work, so it takes lots of calories to generate kJoules.

Why it's important: hey, I ain't no engineer.

Zinger 01-06-14 06:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dudelsack (Post 16386391)
For non engineers, and apologies to the ones out there:
Watt: momentary measure of power, like how much you're putting out right this instant.
Joules: how much work (moving stuff from point a to point b) you do when you stack all the watts together.
kJoules: how much work we cyclists generate.
Calories: how much energy it takes to do the work.
Interestingly, we generate far more heat than work, so it takes lots of calories to generate kJoules.

Why it's important: hey, I ain't no engineer.

I thought it had to do with light bulbs. Since I don't ride at night I didn't think it would concern me :lol:

unabowler 01-06-14 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dudelsack (Post 16376430)
"42" is my designation for over 50 cyclists who do not race and hence don't belong in the "33", but are on some sort of formal training program aiming at some sort of goal.

"42" is chosen because no one here uses it, unlike 41 or 33. It is also the answer to the meaning of life, the universe, and pretty much everything.

As I've mentioned ad nauseum, I'm doing the easiest of the TCTP, aiming to do the Redbud ride century in April. If I do well, I'm going to do the Kentucky three century in a year challenge, which is pretty tough.

I do my field test on Saturday, which will allow precise calculation of my pitifully low FTP. The program starts Monday.

I'm hoping this will keep me, and you perhaps, from bagging it after a week or two.

Anyone else?

Dusel, I live in the Ville and looked at the Redbud ride but decided I likely wouldn't do it. Maybe by the time of the Horsey Hundred I'll be up for an event. I'd love to do a flat to moderate metric century this year, might be later in the year and further away, though. I got out on New Year's Day and again this past Saturday, only for about 25 miles each time but I was really glad to get out. Might not happen again for a while with the weather we're likely to get.

woodway 01-06-14 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Artkansas (Post 16385826)
Volts * Watts = Amps

Has this changed recently? When I went to engineering school: Amps = Watts / Volts. But maybe it's new math and I have not caught on yet :)

BlazingPedals 01-06-14 07:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Artkansas (Post 16385826)
Volts * Watts = Amps

Um... That formula looks a bit crooked to me.

Biker395 01-06-14 07:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dudelsack (Post 16377637)
Gee, my written expression is woefully deficient. No offense taken by any part of your post. Sorry if it came across that way. Need more of these, I guess :lol:

TCTP = Time Crunched Training Program.

Redbud Ride = cool regional ride in April. In da boonies of central Kentucky. First in a series of centuries in our state, all of which are very hilly.

I can ride forever on flat terrain, but climbing kicks my butt. I'm hoping to get better at it, hence the program.

FTP = Functional Threshhold Power, the wattage you can generate for a full hour. Closely related to but not the same as lactate Threshhold.

Chris Carmichael's The time-crunched cyclist. For the next 11 weeks, carries more authority than the Bible/Origen of the species/Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy or maybe even the Huffington Post.

No expert. I just read his book over the holidays. I'm trying to answer a question posed on another thread: is there any hope for us slackers over 60? I intend to find out.

Dudelsack, you know the answer to that last question. For us slackers over 60 (not me yet, but soon), the ONLY thing we have is hope. :p

FWIW, I think you can actually train up pretty quickly, if you can find a way to include it in a daily regimen. I trained for the 508 (which turned out to be 353) in only 5 weeks. But I did that by turning my daily commute into a time-trial, and doing 250+ mile weekends until the race itself.

You know the rule ... if you can do X comfortably, you can do 2X with reasonable discomfort. Train to do X comfortably.

As far as hills, I have the following advice:

1. If you have weight to lose, go for it. It really does help.
2. Learn to pedal in circles. It makes a huge difference.
3. Get low enough gears so you can do #2 comfortably.
4. Embrace Velomanti Rule #5 . :D

Dudelsack 01-07-14 06:22 AM

4X6SS today. Put away wet.

http://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x...ps0cbf3d8f.jpg

qcpmsame 01-07-14 06:36 AM

As an engineer I'll put in the following:

1. Ohm's Law:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohm%27s_law

2. "BFN-Engineers" law of riding distance:
If one rides a many, many miles that is a Watt of miles.
If one rides a whole lot more than many miles that is a Whole Watt of miles
If one only rides a few miles, less than many miles, that is a Widdle bit of miles.

Bill

climberguy 01-07-14 08:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dudelsack (Post 16389438)
4X6SS today.

Translation, please.

dynodonn 01-07-14 09:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Biker395 (Post 16388606)
But I did that by turning my daily commute into a time-trial, and doing 250+ mile weekends until the race itself.

Goodgawd, I get all the excitement and cardiovascular workout I want, just working urban rush hour traffic.

Dudelsack 01-07-14 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by qcpmsame (Post 16389457)
As an engineer I'll put in the following:

1. Ohm's Law:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohm%27s_law

2. "BFN-Engineers" law of riding distance:
If one rides a many, many miles that is a Watt of miles.
If one rides a whole lot more than many miles that is a Whole Watt of miles
If one only rides a few miles, less than many miles, that is a Widdle bit of miles.

Bill

You wascal :lol:

SS = steady state, riding near but just under lactic threshhold. 6 minutes, 5 minute rest, then do it again three more times.

IBOHUNT 01-07-14 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dudelsack (Post 16385591)
Good point. I thought that was why I did the field test. My "endurance ride" involves so little wattage, some of you could probably do it in your sleep.

Wait till you are in a group trainer session and get shelled off the back...

climberguy 01-07-14 03:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dudelsack (Post 16390089)

SS = steady state, riding near but just under lactic threshhold.

I just found another answer to my question. According to Hunter Allen, SS=sweet spot, with the same meaning as you indicated above.

Sounds like a good trainer workout.

osteoclast 01-07-14 08:10 PM

[QUOTE=Road Fan;16377797....
Biggest challenge is winter training. The plan I'm making has us starting base/endurance training (indoor or outdoor rides in a growth pattern designed by Mike and Dede Barry) .....[/QUOTE]

When the weather outside is sub zero and there is snow and ice on the roads, from November/ December to March, what's the training/ riding/ zen routine.

Would be interested in Mike Barry's "growth pattern"; Le Métier?

Of course if one works full time, one might just have to resort to the TCC.


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