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  1. #1
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    Tube failure Times Two

    Today was a great day ride here in the mid-west so, I decided to take the hybrid out for an easy spin.
    1. I get all of my gear on and head out to the garage
    2. Pull the bike out the driveway
    3. Attach the Garmin
    4. Air up the back tire
    5. Air up the front tire. Oops tire is flat
    6. I pull a brand new tube out of box install the tube and begin to air it up and the tube fails as the valve stem (still trying to figure that one out)
    7. I grab the spare tube out of my saddlebag install it and begin to air it up, I apparently pinched the tube because at 80 psi it blows
    8. To nice a day not to ride so, I pulled the roadie out of the garage air up the tires and get a nice 39 miles in
    9. Going to LBS tomorrow and ask for replaced for failed tube and buy a couple more


    FYI - I think I need to use the flour trick in my tire to allow the tube to move around while it is being aired up.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Planemaker View Post
    Today was a great day ride here in the mid-west so, I decided to take the hybrid out for an easy spin.
    1. I get all of my gear on and head out to the garage
    2. Pull the bike out the driveway
    3. Attach the Garmin
    4. Air up the back tire
    5. Air up the front tire. Oops tire is flat
    6. I pull a brand new tube out of box install the tube and begin to air it up and the tube fails as the valve stem (still trying to figure that one out)
    7. I grab the spare tube out of my saddlebag install it and begin to air it up, I apparently pinched the tube because at 80 psi it blows
    8. To nice a day not to ride so, I pulled the roadie out of the garage air up the tires and get a nice 39 miles in
    9. Going to LBS tomorrow and ask for replaced for failed tube and buy a couple more


    FYI - I think I need to use the flour trick in my tire to allow the tube to move around while it is being aired up.
    you dont need flour, you put the new tube in air it up let it down, then air it up again ,this allows the tube to get all the folds out and sets the tube in proper place. When a tire sits and goes down you cant just air it up and ride. You have to air it up while checking the beads are seating properly. Many times after the tire sits awhile the beads unseat, someone airs it up,,the beads arent seated and boom real quick.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Planemaker View Post
    FYI - I think I need to use the flour trick in my tire to allow the tube to move around while it is being aired up.
    you dont need flour, you put the new tube in air it up let it down, then air it up again ,this allows the tube to get all the folds out and sets the tube in proper place. When a tire sits and goes down you cant just air it up and ride. You have to air it up while checking the beads are seating properly.
    First, use powder instead of flour. Flour and water make a paste that turns into a mess, especially when it dries. Also powder really helps getting the tire on and not so much when you add air.

    Completely agree on checking the bead to be sure the tube isn't caught before inflating. It's alway good to have a couple pounds in the tube while mounting - not enough to make the job difficult. Then let the air out and look all around the bead to be certain the tube isn't pinched. Inflate and you won't have a problem.
    You're just trying to start an argument to show how smart you are.

  4. #4
    Senior Member CustomSteel's Avatar
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    Yeah, that paste is gross. Honestly I've never used powder for mounting tires, but some of the tires that I've mounted were pretty darn tight and could benefited with some assistance.

    I third the techniques on airing the tubes. As soon as I get one side of the tire on, I add a little air to the inner tube so that it doesn't get caught anywhere. Plus it just seems to make life easier overall. After I get the other side of the tire mounted, I let the air out of the tube and make sure that everything is lined up where I want it. Then I air it up and watch the bead for any potential problems. If I see any, I let most of the air out of the tube and resituate the tube and/or tire as needed, then I air it up again. Works like a charm.

    I have had a tube blow out for no reason, it just burst on an odd line inside of the tire. I pulled it out and brought it in to the shop where I bought it, and the mechanic gave me a new one without any hassle.

  5. #5
    USMC Veteran qcpmsame's Avatar
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    Agreed on not using a flour for tubes, I always use a talcum powder like a baby powder to make the tube move about smoothly while getting it in the tire and rim. Also, I agree with the method of inflating the tube enough to make it rounder and eliminate the folds from where it was packed then letting the tube down enough for it to fit easily. This makes the tube easier to keep inside of the tire and rim so you don't pinch as you run the bead in. I use my hands (thumbs mostly) to push the tire in place and only use a plastic lever to seat the last few mm, if necessary. My choice of Gatorskins in the 700X25 does give me a bit if a challenge on getting the very last part over the rim, but it is doable. I learned to get the tire warmed up by laying it out in the sun or even some warm water before instaling it, makes some difference. Sorry you day had a difficult time starting, but it sounds like you got in a nice ride anyway.

    Bill
    Last edited by qcpmsame; 01-31-14 at 05:11 PM.
    "I Can Do All Things Through Christ Who Strengthens Me" Philippians 4:13

  6. #6
    Senior Member az_cyclist's Avatar
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    This reminds me to pick up some talcum powder.

    I dont mean to hijack the thread, but this is a related question. How many of you patch your tubes? I have for about the past year. I used to use thorn resistant tubes along with Conti Ultragatorskins. I could never get a patch to take on a thorn resistant tube, so I switched to regular tubes.

  7. #7
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    Patch em 4 or 5 times unless they don't hold pressure well between rides. I had problems with Spesh tubes failing where the valve is in the tube and stopped using them. I've always used the Rema Tip-Top in the green box. Never had a problem. I used to carry a spare + patches, but for the past couple of years ditched the spare. Had the first flat on the new bike yesterday. Was raining all day, finally cleared up a bit around 5 so about an hour and a quarter of light and went out, rear was soft. Besides patching I took some time to clean the frame and wheel while it was out and ended up with only a half hour to ride, but I tried to put it to good use.

    scott s.
    .

  8. #8
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    talc . hydrophobic , not flour .. the idea is to keep the tube from sticking to the tire

    not making pancakes..

  9. #9
    Senior Member Timtruro's Avatar
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    I carry patches but usually replace the entire tube at the first opportunity.
    "If there are no cigars in heaven, I shall not go." -Mark Twain

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  10. #10
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    For new tubes I don't add any air when installing, just open the valve. Once every thing is on, give it a visual check to make sure the tube is inside the tire, and the bead is inside the rim. Then add a few pounds of air, enough so the bead is in place, check again. If it looks ok, air it up, and ride away.
    Yup tubes get patched. I'll wait till I have a few that need repair, then have a patching session. I also label the tubes, so my wife knows which tube to use for which bike. Every so often I'll buy 2 or three tubes, usually before an organised ride, so I have a fresh one in the seat bag.
    After 4 or 5 patches, it will go out of rotation.
    If you don't know the way, you shouldn't be going there.

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