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-   -   What bike to get for recently retirees (http://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plus-50/937042-what-bike-get-recently-retirees.html)

Dudelsack 03-07-14 09:04 AM

OP has one post to his name, and there have been 25 responses on this thread. Perhaps we should await some feedback on his part.

David Bierbaum 03-07-14 09:07 AM

Here's an example of the quality you get for the extra money. In 1992 I bought a hybrid from a not-so-local bicycle shop. It is now 2014, and I am still riding my Specialized Crossroads, and the only parts I've had to change were my tires, my chain, and (as a matter of preference) my handlebars in all that time. Well, maybe the bearings in the hubs and some spokes in my wheels count as well... :)

However, none of this advice is really helpful if you don't have the money to spend, or the time to shop around. (Just what is it about retirement that seems to make people MORE busy than they were while they were working?!?!?!) This point might be the time to look up a bicycle co-op in your area. These usually have bicycle restoration enthusiasts, and plenty of old cheap bicycles.

Another thing to consider is what you want to do with the bicycles. There are many levels of enjoyment to be had with these two-wheeled wonders, from all the errand-running and local area trips (Spring and Fall Suburban Lawn gazing rides through some of the nicer suburbs is a favorite of mine), to weekend scenic toodles at your local bicycling/multi-use trails, to longer excursions and possible touring. You may even want to do off-road riding. Do you have a good idea of what and/or where you want to bicycle?

I'm kind of afraid of all the advice we (myself included) are throwing at you, since I'm well aware of the fact that too much to consider can sometimes lead to not deciding at all. Sometimes you just have to ignore all the advice, and just jump in, even if that means getting a Wal-Mart bicycle, having problems, regretting it, and getting a different bicycle.

Edit: I guess it's up to 27 responses now! ;)

brayton1 03-07-14 09:53 AM

Thanks for all the responses. My wife and I just plan to ride our bikes within our community on paved roads and sidewalks just for fun and exercise. Maybe in the 10-15 mile range when we build up to it. We live in a community in NC where we have four golf courses and that is our primary passion. However, I don't want to buy too cheap (by my standards) of a bike incase we enjoy this, plus I want to be on something reasonably comfortable to ride and reasonably safe. Forget the pedal forward or tricycles, that's not for us. But we just bought and furnished a new house and we are not flush enough to go out and spend another $1000 + on bikes when we're not sure how much we will end up using them. Are we going to go that wrong (coat hangers in the garage) if we get a couple Schwinn Discover Hybrids for $273. or Diamondback Wildwood Citi Classic Sport for $199 (Cosco) or please recommend something else. You certainly have a lot more knowledge about bikes than us. Anything at the LBS that was more than one speed was like $500 to start.

BlazingPedals 03-07-14 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brayton1 (Post 16556998)
Are we going to go that wrong (coat hangers in the garage) if we get a couple Schwinn Discover Hybrids for $273. or Diamondback Wildwood Citi Classic Sport for $199 (Cosco) or please recommend something else. You certainly have a lot more knowledge about bikes than us. Anything at the LBS that was more than one speed was like $500 to start.

Both of those bikes break two cardinal rules of mine:
1. suspension on low-end bikes - The builder wastes money on a minimally-functional and unneeded shock and must cheap-out somewhere else to meet the price point.
2. selling through a large retail store means questionable build and no expertise if you have problems

Of the two, the Diamondback at least comes in different sizes, which is a must in my book. The Schwinn looks like it comes in one-size-fits-none.

DiabloScott 03-07-14 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brayton1 (Post 16556998)
Are we going to go that wrong (coat hangers in the garage) if we get a couple Schwinn Discover Hybrids for $273. or Diamondback Wildwood Citi Classic Sport for $199 (Cosco).

Sorry if we sound like bike snobs here... but I do think your price point is a little lower than the low bar most of us would set for a friend who asks us for advise. It's just that we've seen too many people buy junk bikes and then don't enjoy them. I don't know if this is a fair comparison, but if someone interested in taking up golf asked you for an opinion on the $150 golf clubs (complete set including bag!) at Target vs the $190 ones at Walmart... what would you tell them?

Those bikes will be rideable; probably won't be much fun to ride, probably won't be assembled very well, probably won't stay adjusted very long, and probably will be hard to maintain. Costco and Walmart probably won't let you take them out for a ride first so you won't really know.

10 Wheels 03-07-14 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiabloScott (Post 16557309)
Sorry if we sound like bike snobs here... but I do think your price point is a little lower than the low bar most of us would set for a friend who asks us for advise. It's just that we've seen too many people buy junk bikes and then don't enjoy them. I don't know if this is a fair comparison, but if someone interested in taking up golf asked you for an opinion on the $150 golf clubs (complete set including bag!) at Target vs the $190 ones at Walmart... what would you tell them?

Those bikes will be rideable; probably won't be much fun to ride, probably won't be assembled very well, probably won't stay adjusted very long, and probably will be hard to maintain. Costco and Walmart probably won't let you take them out for a ride first so you won't really know.

http://wilmington.craigslist.org/bia/

http://wilmington.craigslist.org/bik/4325494570.html

MRT2 03-07-14 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiabloScott (Post 16557309)
Sorry if we sound like bike snobs here... but I do think your price point is a little lower than the low bar most of us would set for a friend who asks us for advise. It's just that we've seen too many people buy junk bikes and then don't enjoy them. I don't know if this is a fair comparison, but if someone interested in taking up golf asked you for an opinion on the $150 golf clubs (complete set including bag!) at Target vs the $190 ones at Walmart... what would you tell them?

Those bikes will be rideable; probably won't be much fun to ride, probably won't be assembled very well, probably won't stay adjusted very long, and probably will be hard to maintain. Costco and Walmart probably won't let you take them out for a ride first so you won't really know.

This! There is a cost of entry into biking as a sport or even semi regular activity. If you don't have the budget for $1,000 to $1,200 to start, the bike co op suggestion is a good one. That or, find a local bike shop that sells used bikes. They are out there. Not the big corporate shops, but many smaller shops will take a bike in trade, tune it up, replace worn parts and sell it at 50 to 75% markup. Pretty much a win win for both you and the shop if you can get a bike that sold for $500 or $600 a few years ago but within your budget of $200 to $275.

Stay away from department stores and other big box retailers. While you can get a great deal on toilet paper, it isn't such a good idea for bikes unless you really know what you are doing.

MRT2 03-07-14 11:28 AM

If that one fits, you should get it.

DiabloScott 03-07-14 11:32 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Another suggestion - instead of a hybrid, consider a beach cruiser; single speed, unpretentious, lots of fun, perfect for riding around the neighborhood. Most bike shops will have a few close to your price point, and it'll be put together right.

This one is $250 at REI...I would totally buy one of these for myself if I had room in the garage.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=367605http://www.rei.com/pix/common/pixel.gif
http://www.electrabike.com/sites/def...lic/211173.jpg

Cycle Babble 03-07-14 11:35 AM

brayton1,
Welcome...hope these threads serve you well as they did me.

The short answer is No, a $273 dollar WalMart bike is not a bad bike for a weekend warrior. I used to ride a Huffy 10 speed back in the days when I could not afford anything more. I put a bunch of miles on it and literally rode it until the wheels fell off (bearings gave out but not until I had over 2,000+ miles).

I think most folks here have been around bikes for a long time and know the difference when it comes to box store and bike store bikes. Tha being said I would recommend you shop around because there are bike shop bikes that do cost less than you think. Here is one example in my area: http://emerys.com/product/trek-700-72948-1.htm.

My advise would be: Don't buy the first one you see. Look around at multiple stores (including a few bike shops) and pick one you feel will fit your needs the best. Keep in mind, as others have said, you may want a local bike shop tune up a bike you buy from a box store and allow some expense for that. You will more than likely be happier for that.


Thanks and good luck,
John S

brayton1 03-07-14 11:53 AM

What bike to get .....
 
Thanks for that response with the ad on craigslist. I have been checking the craigslist in Wilmington and Myrtle Beach everyday(sometimes more than once a day) since I started looking and I think that ad went on before I started to look. It looks like a great bike and I've emailed the poster already. Maybe he hasn't sold it yet. Thanks again everyone for all the feedback so far.

Gerryattrick 03-07-14 04:05 PM

Used is a much better option in your price range, and I wouldn't bother with suspension for the sort of riding you are planning.

Good luck with the search, the better the bike you start off with the more you'll enjoy cycling.

HawkOwl 03-07-14 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brayton1 (Post 16556998)
Thanks for all the responses. My wife and I just plan to ride our bikes within our community on paved roads and sidewalks just for fun and exercise. Maybe in the 10-15 mile range when we build up to it. We live in a community in NC where we have four golf courses and that is our primary passion. However, I don't want to buy too cheap (by my standards) of a bike incase we enjoy this, plus I want to be on something reasonably comfortable to ride and reasonably safe. Forget the pedal forward or tricycles, that's not for us. But we just bought and furnished a new house and we are not flush enough to go out and spend another $1000 + on bikes when we're not sure how much we will end up using them. Are we going to go that wrong (coat hangers in the garage) if we get a couple Schwinn Discover Hybrids for $273. or Diamondback Wildwood Citi Classic Sport for $199 (Cosco) or please recommend something else. You certainly have a lot more knowledge about bikes than us. Anything at the LBS that was more than one speed was like $500 to start.

Do It! Either one will work. My Bias is to the Schwinn. But, you should probably ride both to see which one you like best. Make the test rides at least a couple miles long.

Those of us who like to ride and have experience tend to be bike snobs. We see the fine differences between bikes and have grown to appreciate them. Or, at least to say we do.

In fact, each individual needs to discover what suits their needs. You are starting off just to kick around the area, run a few errands and generally enjoy yourself. You may, or may not, take up cycling as a hobby as differentiated from cycling as a means of transportation. No sense getting too much money into bikes until you know what you are going to do.

Then you can either keep on keeping on, sell and buy something else, or buy something else and use these as run around bikes where if they are damaged or stolen you won't cry.

No matter what you are a winner.

qcpmsame 03-08-14 09:44 AM

A thought as to where to buy, at the price point you have right now there are some attractive prices at Nashbar (On-line retailer) right now, they have one of their always running 50% off sales and their own labeled bicycles are some of the items listed. They have different types, mountain bikes, city bikes, hybrids, flat bar road, etc, that come on around 250-300 USD listed in their email ad I received this morning. http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/st...0053_10052_-1?

This is a reputable business, I, and a of of the members here, use them for almost anything you can think of. I have no connection to them what so ever, I do not benefit from any thing bought there, just an idea for your search.

Bill

tcs 03-08-14 03:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rydabent (Post 16556710)
Bents and trikes dont hurt you as you ride.

I once counted six descriptions of different rider pains and discomforts in a single issue of Recumbent Cyclist News. ;)

BlazingPedals 03-09-14 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcs (Post 16560609)
I once counted six descriptions of different rider pains and discomforts in a single issue of Recumbent Cyclist News. ;)

If you did, they were pains that someone no longer had since switching. :innocent: Seriously, the major complaints I ever read on RCN were 1. Recumbent butt, which is sore glutes, 2. hot foot, and 3. sore knees. Recumbent butt, being sore muscles, aside from being completely preventable, is nowhere near the issue as having bruised perch bones; and as for the other two, people get them on uprights too. One thing's for sure, a couple of retirees ambling around the neighborhood don't need to worry about keeping their bikes UCI-legal.

In this case, no bents simply because they're probably too expensive. Even a few low-end Sun models would be twice what they're willing to pay. OTOH, they'd probably use them twice as much.

Dudelsack 03-09-14 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiabloScott (Post 16557353)
Another suggestion - instead of a hybrid, consider a beach cruiser; single speed, unpretentious, lots of fun, perfect for riding around the neighborhood. Most bike shops will have a few close to your price point, and it'll be put together right.

This one is $250 at REI...I would totally buy one of these for myself if I had room in the garage.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=367605http://www.rei.com/pix/common/pixel.gif
http://www.electrabike.com/sites/def...lic/211173.jpg

If the OP lives on the beaches of Carolina, this would be perfect. I used to go yearly to Ocean Isle Beach and ride a ratty old rental cruiser and have reasonable amounts of fun. It would be great on a well-kept cruiser. Can't go wrong, really.

Retro Grouch 03-09-14 12:07 PM

Just do it!

You can research till you're blue in the face but, until you actually buy bikes and try it, you won't know how it's going to go. Possibly the most important function of your first bike is to figure out what features you want in your next bike.

fietsbob 03-09-14 12:16 PM

bring or send them to a bike shop and test ride bikes in person.

sonatageek 03-09-14 12:33 PM

I looked at the Craigslist listings and immediately saw the Trek 850 mountain bike for $99. With slick street tires something like that would make a fine and comfortable neighborhood ride.

dannwilliams 03-09-14 12:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sonatageek (Post 16562592)
I looked at the Craigslist listings and immediately saw the Trek 850 mountain bike for $99. With slick street tires something like that would make a fine and comfortable neighborhood ride.

+1
The bike I use for riding around the 'hood, going to the coffee shop downtown, and on the multi use/bike paths is an old mountain bike with street tires. Very nice ride for this type of riding!

lenA 03-09-14 01:32 PM

One of these if you can assemble it which shouldn't take much

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...e_express3.htm

crtreedude 03-09-14 05:33 PM

At the risk of being scorned, my current bike is a F900 Cannondale, probably at least 14 years old now. Granted, I have replaced brakes, gears, chains, etc, some more than once. Just rode it this morning, still wonderful - and a heck of a lot better than I am... but hey, old geezers need all the help they can get is what I say...

So, you don't need new, to have a great ride. Always remember that. Or as I like to say, I am an oldie, but a goodie too....

The latest bike with all the latest gizmos would be great if you really want one, but honestly, a used bike which is 10 years behind in technology is probably better than most of us... :rolleyes:

Save your money for when / if you become addicted.

MinnMan 03-09-14 05:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crtreedude (Post 16563251)
Save your money for when / if you become addicted.

This made me laugh.

signed,

an addict

VegasTriker 03-10-14 09:56 AM

A recumbent bike or trike, like any other bike, will give you fits if it doesn't fit. You have to find one that is right and them make adjustments for leg length and possibly for seat angle. I found ones that fit me and have ridden more miles comfortably on them than most ordinary people ride in more than a lifetime.

BTW, Recumbent Cyclist News ceased publication in December 2007 so anything your are quoting from it is quite old.


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