Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 56
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What bike to get for recently retirees

    My wife and I recently retired and we want to get a couple comfort/hybrid bikes. Can someone steer us right. We started looking at a couple resale Huffy's which didn't work for me as I generally like to research on the internet and buy somewhat decent quality. We'll now we have been looking at Walmart bikes, Sears, Dicks and bikesdirect. Budget is around $200-$300 bikes. Schwinn Discover, Diamondback Wildwood Classic and Vital2, and some on bikesdirect (Dawes Hybrid Eclipse1; Eclispe City; Windsor Rover 1 & Dover 1; Gravity Hybrid Dutch; Schwinn Voyageur IG3) have been some of what we have been looking at. Don't want to underbuy or overbuy.
    Any help is appreciated.

    Brady

  2. #2
    Senior Member zonatandem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    My Bikes
    ariZona carbon fiber tandem & single
    Posts
    10,042
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Less price = less bike.
    Buy the best you can afford.

  3. #3
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    1,746
    Mentioned
    35 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you get a bike at a non bike shop, wally, target BD, don't count on it being assembled properly ..

    you might have to take it to someone that knows how to put it right, IE taking it to a Bike Shop anyways..

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Sin City, Nevada
    My Bikes
    Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, Wizwheelz 3.4 trike, Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB
    Posts
    800
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Your price range suggests buying used if you want a decent quality bike.

    There's a couple of things to look at when you look for a decent used bike that will help to avoid junk like the Huffy you mentioned. It is not easy but there are a lot of older, quality bikes that can give you years of pleasant riding. Pick up the bike. If it feels like you grabbed a set of weights for weight lifting, move on to something better. You can weigh a bike by using a standard bathroom scale. Weigh yourself and repeat it holding the bike steady. The difference is the weight of the bike. I wouldn't buy anything weighing over 30 pounds. In general, the lighter the bike the better the quality of the bike. Does the bike have quick release for both wheels? If the axles on the wheels are held using nuts, walk away. The worst of the worst have what is known as a one-piece crank. It's a single chunk of metal with pedals at each end. It is the sign of a really cheap bike. Most of the mass merchandiser bikes no longer use this type of crank. Avoid bikes with suspension unless the bike had a pretty hefty MSRP when it was new. Most of the suspensions on cheap bikes don't work well and add a lot of weight to and already obese bike. Last of all, find somebody who knows bikes and is willing to help you choose a suitable bike.

    There is a website named Bikepedia www.bikepedia.com where you can look up the original price of an older bike (MSRP) by putting in the brand name, model, and year of the bike. That way you can verify what someone tells you about what they paid for the bike when they bought it. I recently saw a woman's bike at a garage sale and asked about it for a friend. It was fairly new and the owner wanted a lot for it. I looked up the MSRP and knew that the seller either was a liar or got a really bad deal. It wasn't a bad bike but certainly wasn't worth what he was asking. A lot of the brand names you remember as a kid are now made in China for sale by mass merchandisers like WalMart and Target. They are sometimes poorly assembled and hit and miss as to quality. If you buy a used bike originally sold by a bike shop you will be much better off.

    If you wanted a really comfortable bike for an older person I'd suggest a recumbent but they are so far outside of the price range you listed that it is not a realistic suggestion.

  5. #5
    Senior Member MinnMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    My Bikes
    2011 Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220, 1991 Bianchi Osprey
    Posts
    1,645
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My wife started out a couple of years ago on a Trek 7.0FX. It was about $350, as I recall. She liked it fine. Of course now she's on to n+1 and you could argue we should have spent more money to begin with, but everybody has to learn that lesson for themselves.

    Also, fit is more important than anything. Buy from a local bike shop (LBS), not a big-box store or an online outfit. It may cost a little bit more, but you won't be throwing your money away.

  6. #6
    It's MY mountain DiabloScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Mt.Diablo
    Posts
    5,558
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by brayton1 View Post
    We'll now we have been looking at Walmart bikes, Sears, Dicks and bikesdirect. Budget is around $200-$300 bikes. Schwinn Discover, Diamondback Wildwood Classic and Vital2, and some on bikesdirect (Dawes Hybrid Eclipse1; Eclispe City; Windsor Rover 1 & Dover 1; Gravity Hybrid Dutch; Schwinn Voyageur IG3) have been some of what we have been looking at.

    Brady
    Those are great bikes for riding once and then using as coat hangers in the garage.

    Go to a bike store please.
    http://diabloscott.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    A might bewildered... Dudelsack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Loovul
    My Bikes
    Bacchetta Giro ATT 26; Lemond Buenos Aires
    Posts
    6,292
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post
    Those are great bikes for riding once and then using as coat hangers in the garage.

    Go to a bike store please.
    Quite right. Quite right.

    Quite right.

    I don't think you can go wrong with the Trek 7.X series.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,406
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm taking issue with calling Huffy bikes "junk". That just is not so. I put a lot of reliable miles on a Huffy. They and bikes like rhem are excellent for the just starting, I'm not sure I am going to like this bike riding thing.

    Huffy and Schwinn happen to be my rwo favorite brands. Buy a couple. See if you like riding. If you do then buy a couple of "nice" bikes that are exactly what you want. Or, it may turn out that they fill your needs.

  9. #9
    <riding now> BigAura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Chapin, SC
    My Bikes
    surly LHT, paris sport fixie, trek 5000, fuji ss
    Posts
    1,437
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If not a Local Bike Shop, you might want to look a REI their bikes go on sale in March. They have a great return policy if you're not happy.

  10. #10
    Senior Member MinnMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    My Bikes
    2011 Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220, 1991 Bianchi Osprey
    Posts
    1,645
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
    If not a Local Bike Shop, you might want to look a REI their bikes go on sale in March. They have a great return policy if you're not happy.
    +1

  11. #11
    Senior Member MinnMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    My Bikes
    2011 Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220, 1991 Bianchi Osprey
    Posts
    1,645
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HawkOwl View Post
    I'm taking issue with calling Huffy bikes "junk". That just is not so. I put a lot of reliable miles on a Huffy. They and bikes like rhem are excellent for the just starting, I'm not sure I am going to like this bike riding thing.

    Huffy and Schwinn happen to be my rwo favorite brands. Buy a couple. See if you like riding. If you do then buy a couple of "nice" bikes that are exactly what you want. Or, it may turn out that they fill your needs.
    Schwinn isn't what it used to be, but that's not the main point IMHO. The main point is that there's no way for neophytes to buy a bike at Walmart and know what size to buy, how to position the seat, etc. Schwinn is sold at LBS, but I don't think Huffy is. If they OP wants to buy a Schwinn at his LBS, that might work out fine.

    Again, fit is more important than brand, and nobody at a big box store is going to know what the hell they are talking about when selling bikes.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,406
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnMan View Post
    Schwinn isn't what it used to be, but that's not the main point IMHO. The main point is that there's no way for neophytes to buy a bike at Walmart and know what size to buy, how to position the seat, etc. Schwinn is sold at LBS, but I don't think Huffy is. If they OP wants to buy a Schwinn at his LBS, that might work out fine.

    Again, fit is more important than brand, and nobody at a big box store is going to know what the hell they are talking about when selling bikes.
    Again, just not so. I've been in bike shops where the staff hadn't a clue. Oh, they could rattle off the prescribed spiel. But they didn't know much more. On the other hand I've been in box stores where the staff knew their product and could offer good advice.

    For a rank beginner as the OP appears to be precise, to the last mm fit isn't nearly as important as it is to many of the aficionados like you seem to be. IF they like cycling they will find a way to buy "nicer" bikes appropriate to whatever they do.

    REI is a good idea. They usually, but not always, have good staff. With sales might be able to score.

  13. #13
    Senior Member MinnMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    My Bikes
    2011 Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220, 1991 Bianchi Osprey
    Posts
    1,645
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HawkOwl View Post

    REI is a good idea. They usually, but not always, have good staff. With sales might be able to score.
    This we agree on.

  14. #14
    Senior Member irwin7638's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    My Bikes
    Byron,Sam, The Hunq and that Old Guy
    Posts
    2,375
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do not buy sushi from a gas station or a bicycle from a department store. Both lead to unpleasant and unexpected results.
    Find a bike shop that does a large business in hybrid bikes. I would expect to spend $500-800 but you would get a bike worth riding forever.

    Marc
    Read Simply Cycle

    "I can still do everything I used to, but now I'm mature enough to take a nap without being told." - Me

    "You don't deteriorate from age,you age from deterioration" --Joe Weider

  15. #15
    Third World Layabout crtreedude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Costa Rica
    My Bikes
    Cannondale F900 and Tandem
    Posts
    3,073
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Since you are retired and garage sale is coming, may I suggest you can at times score some incredible deals at garage sales? The best thing is you can quickly get on a bike and know if it feels comfortable for you.

    In the past I picked up bikes that were basically new for pennies on the dollar. Cycling equipment is like exercise equipment, lots of people buy it with good intentions, but not everyone carries through, then, after a while, off to the garage sale it goes.

    By the way, I started with a bike that didn't fit me right, but the price was right (I won it!) - I rode it for about a year, and then went and got something better. As you read here more you will see some people are never satisfied with the bike(s) they have, so they just keep buying more, so I wouldn't worry too much about getting something perfect the first time.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Garfield Cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA
    My Bikes
    Cervelo Prodigy
    Posts
    5,143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Leave full retirement and go into partial retirement. That will get you a better bike for the money. Your $$ constraint is your worse enemy.

  17. #17
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,193
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HawkOwl View Post
    Again, just not so. I've been in bike shops where the staff hadn't a clue. Oh, they could rattle off the prescribed spiel. But they didn't know much more. On the other hand I've been in box stores where the staff knew their product and could offer good advice.

    For a rank beginner as the OP appears to be precise, to the last mm fit isn't nearly as important as it is to many of the aficionados like you seem to be. IF they like cycling they will find a way to buy "nicer" bikes appropriate to whatever they do.

    REI is a good idea. They usually, but not always, have good staff. With sales might be able to score.
    Both exceptions to the rule, in my experience, though maybe in my area, we are just blessed with great bike stores.

  18. #18
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,193
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by irwin7638 View Post
    Do not buy sushi from a gas station or a bicycle from a department store. Both lead to unpleasant and unexpected results.
    Find a bike shop that does a large business in hybrid bikes. I would expect to spend $500-800 but you would get a bike worth riding forever.

    Marc
    And they will stand behind their product, even years after the initial purchase. All you can hope for from a big box is, perhaps returning it if it fails. The thing is, though you pay a few bucks more at a bike shop, most shops will cover service for at least the first year, maybe two, and labor on any upgrades done within that time. If you ride your new bike more than a couple of times, it will need minor adjustments, from fit, to adjusting spoke tension, to brakes and derailleurs. If, god forbid, there is a more serious problem, a good bike shop will, or should address these issues under warranty.

    Now, if you are stuck on a price point below $450 or $500, perhaps used is the way to go, unless you can get a great sale price from a bike shop. Some bike shops will sell used, and that is probably the safest way to buy used. The internet is your friend. Do some research. If a used bike retailed for $600 2 or 3 years ago, looks clean and rides OK and most importantly fits, than $300 on that bike used is money well spent. Even older bikes are not bad buys. If you can get a bike that sold new at a bike shop 10 or 12 years ago for $500, and you can get your hands on it for $100 or $150, that gives you money to replace worn parts, or buy accessories like helmet, lock, shorts, or shoes.
    Last edited by MRT2; 03-07-14 at 06:56 AM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member rydabent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lincoln Ne
    My Bikes
    RANS Stratus TerraTrike Cruiser
    Posts
    4,038
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bikes like anything else up to a point get better. IMO after mid point it becomes name and glitz. Also at his point in life forget racing bikes.

    If you are some what older consider a recumbent or crank forward bike or maybe even a trike. Your body will thank you.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    S.E. Iowa
    My Bikes
    all diamond frames
    Posts
    1,169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree that you would be better off shopping at a bike store than Wal Mart, there is nothing more frustrating than a bike that doesn't work properly. You didnt say where you would be riding? If you have flat terrain, or bike paths, you might consider single speed cruiser bikes. simple to operate and maintain. A Schwinn cruiser comes to mind. $209 at our bike shop. And something to keep in mind is if you or your wife don't take to riding, I would rather have a 200 dollar bike sitting in the garage not being used, than a 600 dollar one.
    Rydadiamond

  21. #21
    Senior Member rydabent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lincoln Ne
    My Bikes
    RANS Stratus TerraTrike Cruiser
    Posts
    4,038
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    crazy

    You bring up a great point. Bikes sitting in garage unused. Many time I have stated that retirees and baby boomers decide that bike riding would be fun and great exercise. To my way of thinking most LBS only have DF bike, and of course talk the prospective cyclist into a bike that will end up hanging in the garage waiting for the garage sale. What happens is the new cyclist finds out that even a "comfort" DF bike hurts to ride. After a dozen or so rides the bike gets hung up forever. But if they would have bought a recumbent or a trike, a larger percentage would continue to ride. Bents and trikes dont hurt you as you ride. You dont have to buy expensive clothes to protect you from your bike. Bents my cost more to buy, but in the long run being able to ride in ordinary street clothes make them a better deal.

    Now I know iron butt DF riders will get their underlovlies in a bunch over what I have posted. But-----------------remember we are talking new riders that dont have calluses on their butt. Also we for the most part are talking older riders that may alread have uniary track problems that a DF saddle will only make worse.

  22. #22
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,193
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
    crazy

    You bring up a great point. Bikes sitting in garage unused. Many time I have stated that retirees and baby boomers decide that bike riding would be fun and great exercise. To my way of thinking most LBS only have DF bike, and of course talk the prospective cyclist into a bike that will end up hanging in the garage waiting for the garage sale. What happens is the new cyclist finds out that even a "comfort" DF bike hurts to ride. After a dozen or so rides the bike gets hung up forever. But if they would have bought a recumbent or a trike, a larger percentage would continue to ride. Bents and trikes dont hurt you as you ride. You dont have to buy expensive clothes to protect you from your bike. Bents my cost more to buy, but in the long run being able to ride in ordinary street clothes make them a better deal.

    Now I know iron butt DF riders will get their underlovlies in a bunch over what I have posted. But-----------------remember we are talking new riders that dont have calluses on their butt. Also we for the most part are talking older riders that may alread have uniary track problems that a DF saddle will only make worse.
    You won't get any argument from me. Though I don't ride a recumbent, those who ride them seem to love them. That said, it makes it hard for OP, who started off thinking about a cheap department store bike for $200 or $300, now getting an overload of information.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    S.E. Iowa
    My Bikes
    all diamond frames
    Posts
    1,169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
    crazy

    You bring up a great point. Bikes sitting in garage unused. Many time I have stated that retirees and baby boomers decide that bike riding would be fun and great exercise. To my way of thinking most LBS only have DF bike, and of course talk the prospective cyclist into a bike that will end up hanging in the garage waiting for the garage sale. What happens is the new cyclist finds out that even a "comfort" DF bike hurts to ride. After a dozen or so rides the bike gets hung up forever. But if they would have bought a recumbent or a trike, a larger percentage would continue to ride. Bents and trikes dont hurt you as you ride. You dont have to buy expensive clothes to protect you from your bike. Bents my cost more to buy, but in the long run being able to ride in ordinary street clothes make them a better deal.

    Now I know iron butt DF riders will get their underlovlies in a bunch over what I have posted. But-----------------remember we are talking new riders that dont have calluses on their butt. Also we for the most part are talking older riders that may alread have uniary track problems that a DF saddle will only make worse.
    Also, we haven't heard from the op about how they intend to ride. A few blocks around the neighborhood, or longer rides. I don't see the average person wearing cycling clothing when riding their cruiser or "comfort bike" around the neighborhood. Big puffy seats are good for a few miles.
    Rydadiamond

  24. #24
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Casseroll, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
    Posts
    2,193
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyb View Post
    Also, we haven't heard from the op about how they intend to ride. A few blocks around the neighborhood, or longer rides. I don't see the average person wearing cycling clothing when riding their cruiser or "comfort bike" around the neighborhood. Big puffy seats are good for a few miles.
    But not great for longer rides. A lot of folks just don't know what they want until they get that first bike. When I bought my first bike as an adult 16 years ago, I thought it was for a one time event; a 25 mile charity ride and beyond that, the occasional 5 or 10 mile neighborhood ride with my wife. I have no regrets, as it was a decent hybrid a step or two above entry level for the time. And it got me into cycling as a sport and an activity. But had I known then what I discovered after just a season or two of riding, I probably would have bought something much different to begin with. I had no idea that regular folks regularly rode 25, 40, and even 75 miles a day, and that with a modest amount of training, I could do it too but, if that was my thing, I probably wanted something more road oriented.
    Last edited by MRT2; 03-07-14 at 07:55 AM.

  25. #25
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    25 miles northwest of Boston
    My Bikes
    Bottecchia Sprint
    Posts
    12,252
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    when you start riding together keep some distance so that when one stops the other doesn't crash into the first. my in-laws bought bikes and they had this kind of accident a couple times.
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •