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Old 07-23-14, 01:23 PM   #51
Nightshade
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
I just carry my wallet with me and usually my cell phone. Don't bother with Road ID.
I disagree. In the event of an emergency where you need help ,or your body identified, one can't count on having either a wallet or a cell.

Either a Road ID or a tattoo under your arm on your rib cage to ID you.
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Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 07-23-14, 08:12 PM   #52
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I disagree. In the event of an emergency where you need help ,or your body identified, one can't count on having either a wallet or a cell.

Either a Road ID or a tattoo under your arm on your rib cage to ID you.
So, if I was brought in with no ID and only a tattoo of the image of Jesus on my chest, my name would be entered into the system as J.C.? Or, did you mean a barcode tattoo?
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Old 07-23-14, 10:01 PM   #53
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I disagree. In the event of an emergency where you need help ,or your body identified, one can't count on having either a wallet or a cell.

Either a Road ID or a tattoo under your arm on your rib cage to ID you.
Nonsense. Dangerous nonsense.

A tattoo of a person's name is not identification. Commonly it can be a memorial for someone, a loved one's name, an important person in the tattooed person's life. etc. Definitely not useable ID. In my work I've seen all these.

On the other hand a GI dog tag is useable for most things. Still, positive ID will not occur until some kind of better ID is provided. Picture ID, ID by a friend or relative, etc.

To me Road ID is an expensive thing that just substitutes for a dog tag.

The best thing, to me, is to carry two IDs. One a picture ID for the most likely reason a person will need to identify themselves. The second is a set of dog tags with name, social security number and any other brief data a person desires. This takes care of all the essentials and is inexpensive.
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Old 07-24-14, 11:07 AM   #54
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So, if I was brought in with no ID and only a tattoo of the image of Jesus on my chest, my name would be entered into the system as J.C.? Or, did you mean a barcode tattoo?
Really?

If this is what you think then your comprehension is way, way off.

Or are you just being a smart pants??
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Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 07-24-14, 02:08 PM   #55
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Really?

If this is what you think then your comprehension is way, way off.

Or are you just being a smart pants??
See HawkOwl's comments about tattoos.
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Old 07-24-14, 06:25 PM   #56
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See HawkOwl's comments about tattoos.
Read'm, don't agree with them at all.

A tattoo of pertinent personal ID info placed under the arm pit on rib cage is a good as it gets.
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I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 07-24-14, 06:31 PM   #57
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We've never allowed dog tags or tattoo's as a form of ID. If we do not have a picture ID you are processed as a Jane or John Doe.
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Old 07-24-14, 06:43 PM   #58
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We've never allowed dog tags or tattoo's as a form of ID. If we do not have a picture ID you are processed as a Jane or John Doe.
Could be but a tattoo is way better than nothing.
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I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 07-24-14, 08:49 PM   #59
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We've never allowed dog tags or tattoo's as a form of ID. If we do not have a picture ID you are processed as a Jane or John Doe.
And then, when the dog tag's info is confirmed, John Doe will be corrected to Mr. Dog Tag Name. Identification confirmation will happen much faster than if no dog tag ID were present. Please don't tell me that you would completely disregard a dog tag ID or Road ID? If my dog tag said cephalosporin allergy, I hope you wouldn't give me cefazolin!
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Old 07-24-14, 09:07 PM   #60
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I have my name and contact info on a card in the inside of my helmet.

I know that emt's wont look inside a bag on my bike and most likely my jersey will be cut off but whats the standard for helmets??

all the emts out there, if you found an unconscious subject at an accident scene and his helmet is still on, do you remove and discard it or will it be left on until in the er?

when you arrive at an auto/bicycle collision scene, does the unconscious cyclist usually still have his helmet on or is it common for it to be knocked off from the impact??
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Old 07-24-14, 09:42 PM   #61
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And then, when the dog tag's info is confirmed, John Doe will be corrected to Mr. Dog Tag Name. Identification confirmation will happen much faster than if no dog tag ID were present. Please don't tell me that you would completely disregard a dog tag ID or Road ID? If my dog tag said cephalosporin allergy, I hope you wouldn't give me cefazolin!
You have to understand the speed in which we work. In a trauma situation we work on what is called the 'golden hour', which used to start when a patient arrived in the trauma bay. Now the golden hour starts when the EMS crew arrives on scene. To the untrained eye, it's utter chaos. I follow strict protocols, which I will not deviate from.

Personal information, when confirmed, is changed when the patient is transferred upstairs. Consequently, any medical history that comes in from personal effects, family information, or medical records is added after as well.

With regards to dog tags, road tags/id's, or tattoo's, unfortunately we cannot give them any credence. There is too much mis-information contained in these items for us to consider them valid. While I understand it's your dog tag with your information, you have to understand how many ex-military wear their fallen comrades dog tags. Road ID's, no matter how well thought out, take too much time for us to find, read, and interpret. Tattoo's seem like a good idea, but what if their covered in blood, or ripped off during a 75 foot slide down the asphalt?

If you have a major medical condition, or allergies the best way for us to find out is to wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace. Every medical professional is trained in their use.

I don't mean to come off as callused, but I have been working for 28 years as a trauma nurse. I know what works and what doesn't. I am merely trying to offer some advice from someone who works in the trenches.
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Old 07-24-14, 10:00 PM   #62
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... Road ID's, no matter how well thought out, take too much time for us to find, read, and interpret. ... If you have a major medical condition, or allergies the best way for us to find out is to wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace. Every medical professional is trained in their use. ...
I'm sorry, but what's the difference between a RoadID bracelet and a medical alert bracelet?

(BTW, thanks for your posting, and thanks for the work that you do; can't be easy.)

Regards, Dick
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Old 07-24-14, 10:11 PM   #63
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I'm sorry, but what's the difference between a RoadID bracelet and a medical alert bracelet?

(BTW, thanks for your posting, and thanks for the work that you do; can't be easy.)

Regards, Dick
Never encountered a Road ID on any patient.

And, ty for the compliment.
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Old 07-24-14, 10:18 PM   #64
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* Road ID Tour de France Discount *

Road ID – Tour de France Sale – Save 15% off any Road ID with coupon code ‘TDF14′.

Expiration Date: 7/27/2014

Road ID Info/Order Link:

www.RoadID.com

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Old 07-25-14, 04:07 PM   #65
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You have to understand the speed in which we work. In a trauma situation we work on what is called the 'golden hour', which used to start when a patient arrived in the trauma bay. Now the golden hour starts when the EMS crew arrives on scene. To the untrained eye, it's utter chaos. I follow strict protocols, which I will not deviate from.

Personal information, when confirmed, is changed when the patient is transferred upstairs. Consequently, any medical history that comes in from personal effects, family information, or medical records is added after as well.

With regards to dog tags, road tags/id's, or tattoo's, unfortunately we cannot give them any credence. There is too much mis-information contained in these items for us to consider them valid. While I understand it's your dog tag with your information, you have to understand how many ex-military wear their fallen comrades dog tags. Road ID's, no matter how well thought out, take too much time for us to find, read, and interpret. Tattoo's seem like a good idea, but what if their covered in blood, or ripped off during a 75 foot slide down the asphalt?

If you have a major medical condition, or allergies the best way for us to find out is to wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace. Every medical professional is trained in their use.

I don't mean to come off as callused, but I have been working for 28 years as a trauma nurse. I know what works and what doesn't. I am merely trying to offer some advice from someone who works in the trenches.
OK. The process you describe probably makes sense for Trauma 1 patients who are potentially Knockin' on Death's Door. Thankfully, most ED patients don't fit in that bucket. Not all Trauma patients do,either.
Thankfully, most of us concerned as cyclists with ID for times that we can't ID ourselves or communicate the important stuff will never be Trauma 1 patients or ever be in a situation where ID is major issue.
I will continue to wear my dog tag ID because it could be useful in a situation that probably won't happen. In this RN's mind, a cheap dog tag is just as valid as a 'medical alert' tag - just doesn't have room for as much info. Thankful that I have no significant medical issues.
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Old 07-25-14, 08:49 PM   #66
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Frankly, if anyone in the field is "too busy" to find a dog tag they are not doing their job according to training standards. Training says that an unresponsive patient, and most patients for that matter, get a head to toe assessment for condition and to check the ABCs. A head to toe initial assessment can be done in seconds and can make all the difference in outcome. In the course of that scan a dog tag will be found. A picture ID worn around the neck will be found. Tattoos may or may not be seen and in any case will be disregarded.

Anything other than a government issued ID that matches the patient is provisional ID but makes little difference in field treatment.

In short: If you are concerned about whoever being able to identify you use a government issued picture ID worn around the neck. Especially if you are in a military community a dog tag will work because it can be quickly cross referenced through the military.
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Old 07-26-14, 04:02 AM   #67
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* Road ID Tour de France Discount *

Road ID – Tour de France Sale – Save 15% off any Road ID with coupon code ‘TDF14′.

Expiration Date: 7/27/2014

Road ID Info/Order Link:

www.RoadID.com
Ordered mine yesterday. As an aside, I recently drove by the Road ID facility on my way to the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport. I had no idea it was based so close to me.
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Old 07-29-14, 06:19 PM   #68
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just a story about that... from someone who was knocked unconcious and had to be taken to the hospital... I had my ID in my jersey pocket (copy of my license). No one ever checked my jersey, nor did they check my Camelbak (which contained my real license), Both were tossed aside (jersey cut off). My friend picked up my Camelbak, thank goodness.

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I have posted about this subject before in reference to what and where you should carry emergency medical information in the event of a serious injury. I worked for 25 years as a Paramedic for one of the busiest EMS systems in the country. I can't count the number of bicycle vs auto crashes that I have responded to in all those years. You can take what I have to say seriously or with a grain of salt - your choice.

1) If you are seriously injured and unresponsive, the primary goal of a first responder is to immobilize you and get you to a trauma center or the closest hospital ER. PERIOD! They will not spend time on scene looking for a wallet for ID and/or medical information. In most cases they will cut off your jersey and pants to check for hidden injuries and will leave them on the scene. Wallets in jersey pockets normally are left behind. Wallets in fanny packs and saddle bags are always left behind.

2) Identification of non-responsive trauma patients usually doesn't happen until the law enforcement agency investigating the crash brings that information to the hospital, if it's found. This could take from one to several hours after the crash. If you can't respond to the ER physicians and nurses, you may end up getting medication that you are allergic to or other treatment that may be detrimental because of your medical history.

3) If you are responsive but can't remember all of your medications and their dosages because the paper you have it written on is in your wallet that's in your saddle bag at the scene, similar consequences to #2 can happen with drug interactions or surgical procedures.
Thank you both for posting ... I've largely ignored similar threads with the mindset that surely someone will look in my jersey pocket for my wallet or cell phone. I'm now a convert and ordered my Road ID's last night - and for my wife as well.
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Old 07-30-14, 10:44 AM   #69
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You have to understand the speed in which we work. In a trauma situation we work on what is called the 'golden hour', which used to start when a patient arrived in the trauma bay. Now the golden hour starts when the EMS crew arrives on scene. To the untrained eye, it's utter chaos. I follow strict protocols, which I will not deviate from.

Personal information, when confirmed, is changed when the patient is transferred upstairs. Consequently, any medical history that comes in from personal effects, family information, or medical records is added after as well.

With regards to dog tags, road tags/id's, or tattoo's, unfortunately we cannot give them any credence. There is too much mis-information contained in these items for us to consider them valid. While I understand it's your dog tag with your information, you have to understand how many ex-military wear their fallen comrades dog tags. Road ID's, no matter how well thought out, take too much time for us to find, read, and interpret. Tattoo's seem like a good idea, but what if their covered in blood, or ripped off during a 75 foot slide down the asphalt?

If you have a major medical condition, or allergies the best way for us to find out is to wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace. Every medical professional is trained in their use.

I don't mean to come off as callused, but I have been working for 28 years as a trauma nurse. I know what works and what doesn't. I am merely trying to offer some advice from someone who works in the trenches.
I can't imagine the speed at which you have to work at. I do wonder though if there is a dog tag with information (I have my name, street address, wife name and Phone#) if that would be completely and utterly disregarded? I would think that there would be a desire to have more information that might help both the treatment and the patient and to just ignore that seems illogical. I do understand it would not be a 1st priority but once the patient is stable and perhaps on the way to the hospital (or there) that data would be used. It also might not be the responsibility of the trauma staff to do but someone else?

Regardless I will keep my dog tag just in case. Something seems to be better than nothing and something on you is better than something on your bike as I learned from this thread. My dog tags cost me $4.89 for 2 with a chain.. pretty cheap insurance it seems

Also thanks to all the professionals who have posted here. Your insight is valued!
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Old 07-30-14, 11:15 AM   #70
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I can't imagine the speed at which you have to work at. I do wonder though if there is a dog tag with information (I have my name, street address, wife name and Phone#) if that would be completely and utterly disregarded? I would think that there would be a desire to have more information that might help both the treatment and the patient and to just ignore that seems illogical. I do understand it would not be a 1st priority but once the patient is stable and perhaps on the way to the hospital (or there) that data would be used. It also might not be the responsibility of the trauma staff to do but someone else?

Regardless I will keep my dog tag just in case. Something seems to be better than nothing and something on you is better than something on your bike as I learned from this thread. My dog tags cost me $4.89 for 2 with a chain.. pretty cheap insurance it seems

Also thanks to all the professionals who have posted here. Your insight is valued!
A dog tag should be useful for ID as long as the chain does not break or it is removed in order to provide aid. Not sure how much information is given on a tag, but with my wristband RoadID, the ER attendants were able to access my medical history without me having to rely on my memory while I was being x-rayed, scanned, cathed-OUCH and otherwise checked over before sending me to another hospital that had a neurosurgeon on call.
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Old 07-30-14, 11:26 AM   #71
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I can't imagine the speed at which you have to work at. I do wonder though if there is a dog tag with information (I have my name, street address, wife name and Phone#) if that would be completely and utterly disregarded? I would think that there would be a desire to have more information that might help both the treatment and the patient and to just ignore that seems illogical. I do understand it would not be a 1st priority but once the patient is stable and perhaps on the way to the hospital (or there) that data would be used. It also might not be the responsibility of the trauma staff to do but someone else?

Regardless I will keep my dog tag just in case. Something seems to be better than nothing and something on you is better than something on your bike as I learned from this thread. My dog tags cost me $4.89 for 2 with a chain.. pretty cheap insurance it seems

Also thanks to all the professionals who have posted here. Your insight is valued!
Hang with the dog tags around your neck. Work very well for thousands of military folks for a wide variety of situations. Their medics are operating under extreme conditions seldom seen in the civilian world and still seem to be able to find dog tags and render proper immediate field care. In my experience there is seldom a situation in the field where there is a rational reason for overlooking dog tags. Threads like these are suspiciously like advertisements for an expensive commercial product.

Once in the hospital the situation changes a bit. Still, the emphasis is on deliberate speed to treat the person presented to the medical team. What is done and when is highly situational. If positive ID is available great. But most immediate care does not depend on ID. However, contrary to what has been implied in this thread, there is a search for things like medical alert tags/bracelets, dog tags on the body, etc. This only takes a few seconds and can make all the difference. But, again, the emphasis is on the patient and ID for treatment, not for notification of others.

I won't go into attitude differences between places and facilities. I think everyone in the 50+ has enough experience to know some are callous, some are patient centered, some are very professional and so on. No different in field medicine and hospital emergency medicine.
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Old 07-30-14, 06:31 PM   #72
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I keep an old driver's license in my seat bag.
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Old 07-30-14, 07:26 PM   #73
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........... I have my ICE number written inside my helmet...
I have a Helmet ID sticker on, and waterproof info envelope in my helmet.

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I keep an old driver's license in my seat bag.
I have a laminated Drivers License/insurance card combo that I made myself at home on my color scanner/copier. I reduced the size a little (made smaller) and edited out personal information. Then added a highlighted COPY in few places.... just in case I lose it. I keep the laminated ID in a Ziploc bag with a few bucks and my cell phone.

I thought the Ziploc bag with money and phone was something we all did.
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