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Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and don’t know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. It’s more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, you’ll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here ya’ go…..the location for everything fit related.

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Old 07-08-13, 08:49 PM   #1
Rich Gibson 
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Evaluating features of a hybrid

I'm trying to get handle on the various features of the Trek FX line. On a few of the reviews of the FX series I saw references to the gearing and controls and there seems to be a lot of opinions. Here's a quote from one forum.

Quote:
Alivio trigger shifters, Deore front deraillerur and Tiagra rear is as high as it gets for the WSD but you might not need that. The mens goes up to 7.9 and has a 105 front and rear.
I recall one writer bemoaning the Deore front deraillerur as garbage. I recall a representative at REI touting the Cannondale Quick 1 SI because it had 105's front and back. Can anyone explain from a practical standpoint the relative advantages and disadvantages?

Thanks, Rich
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Old 07-09-13, 08:23 AM   #2
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Go with 105 components. I have 5 bikes, My first one a Felt F-85, with 105 components now has 40,000 +miles.

I started road riding when I was 65 y/o.

Now a Type 2 Diabetic (71 y/o) with 54,000+ mi on my legs.

A road bike will give you more hand positions.

Have fun shopping. Buy from the Friendly Shop. They will be most helpful with Fitting, quick adjustments, questions and warranty repairs.
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Old 07-09-13, 09:16 AM   #3
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Higher quality is always higher quality. But, almost all Shimano stuff works well, and as designed.

All Deore stuff is high quality, and will work very well. You should be very happy with Deore components.

Higher quality (higher levels in their product line) might shift smoother, and faster. But, in all honesty, most of us will never notice a difference.

Keeping components clean, properly adjusted, and lubricated, will make all the difference in the world to you. You will notice that difference.

Last edited by Wanderer; 07-09-13 at 09:19 AM.
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Old 07-09-13, 10:47 AM   #4
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My daily-commuting coworker just recently made it to 4000 miles on his 7.1 and then the rear axle broke. The Shimano parts including the "junky" Alivio and Tourney and non-group parts are all working fine. A year or so ago he had to put a turn on the barrel adjuster for the rear indexing. Even the worst Trek is a pretty good bike.
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Old 07-09-13, 11:16 AM   #5
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We are talking hybrids here. Deore, 105, are both pretty high end for hybrids. 105 is a road group, Deore a mountain group. FWIW, there are lots of folks riding much lower end hybrids with Altus, Acera and Alivio for years.
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Old 07-09-13, 11:27 AM   #6
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Quote:
... on his 7.1 and then the rear axle broke ...
I think 7.1 is a screw on freewheel, [7 speed in current Specs], not a cassette / freehub.

move up the price point to get those features , they cost more.

YGWYPF still applies.


the lowest cost components are made by fully automated manufacturing..

.. but they still shove the chain sideways.. their prime function..

Last edited by fietsbob; 07-09-13 at 11:33 AM.
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Old 07-09-13, 03:05 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
Higher quality is always higher quality. But, almost all Shimano stuff works well, and as designed.

All Deore stuff is high quality, and will work very well. You should be very happy with Deore components.

Higher quality (higher levels in their product line) might shift smoother, and faster. But, in all honesty, most of us will never notice a difference.

Keeping components clean, properly adjusted, and lubricated, will make all the difference in the world to you. You will notice that difference.
+1!
I have the Trek 7.4FX which has a Deore rear derailleur, and it is wonderful. Also, if you look at the Shimano mountain gearing hierarchy you'll see:
XTR (10)
Saint (9)
Deore XT (9/10)
SLX (9/10)
Zee (10)
Hone (9)
Deore LX (9)
Deore (9/10)
Alivio (8/9)
Acera (8)
Altus (8)
Tourney (8)
Obviously then, with Tourney on the bottom, Deore is in no way "garbage" or low end.
Also, as one or two others posted, plenty of people have gotten excellent service from Acera and Alivio, and even Altus. As Wanderer stated, keeping your bike and its components properly maintained is key.

Meanwhile, just ride and enjoy!
Best regards
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Old 07-09-13, 08:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
I think 7.1 is a screw on freewheel, [7 speed in current Specs], not a cassette / freehub.
That's true but it's the axle that broke, inside the hub. The freewheel is fine.
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Old 07-10-13, 06:11 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
That's true but it's the axle that broke, inside the hub. The freewheel is fine.
Hi,

I think the point was freewheel bikes tend to
break their axles much more than freehubs
due to the bearing being far more inboard.

I think my my freewheeled rear does not have
a QR skewer like the front for this reason.

rgds, sreten.
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Old 07-10-13, 07:53 AM   #10
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Axles can be cheaply replaced, if it's within the 1st year, the warrantee coverage still applies.
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Old 07-10-13, 08:31 AM   #11
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I've decided to buy the Trek FX 7.6 as I begin my adventure back on a bike. After the bike there are other considerations: tires, seats, pedals, a pump, computer, helmet and clothing. I'm seventy-one. I'm not interested in PRs or competition. Perhaps when I was in my thirties and forties, but I'm in this for the enjoyment and fitness.


Just which accessories and gear are 'good enough?' What benefit or advantage are pedals with clip-ons? When are they helpful to use if I never ride over twenty miles or so at a time?


Tires. I see widths all over the place. I understand a wider tire will give a wider surface patch.The FX 7.6 seems pretty thin so I asked the LBS about swapping out the originals for, say 32mm. Would that size be good for the type riding we've discussed?


Seats, there are so many different brands and types. I gather that each person's posterior is unique. Like shoes, I figure that you have to find one which will work best. However, where do you start?


I assume the pump helmet and clothing are individual preferences which will fill the bill as long as you buy a reasonably priced item and not shoot for the bottom.


Computer...really? I use a Smasung Galaxy S3 which has a data plan. I have Copilot which reads the GPS receiver and has a built-in map to display my location. I also use Google's My Tracks which plots out the path on a map and stores speed, average speed, distance and elevation for each route. (I actually use that one for photography uploading the track into Lightroom) I know about the drain on the phone to perform these functions but I have an external backup battery which has over two full charges capacity. Will this be sufficient?
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Old 07-10-13, 11:44 AM   #12
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Hi,

I'd buy a cheaper TREK FX that comes with the size of tires you interested
in. Lower models have 32mm and 35mm tyres. Probably more likely the
saddle that comes with them will also be less racy and more comfortable.

I'd say you'd be better off buying the 7.4 FX for what you want to do, and
of course its a lot cheaper, but I can't see any real advantages of the 7.6.

rgds, sreten.

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Old 07-10-13, 04:04 PM   #13
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Buy a 7.4 Disc - best buy for the buck.................
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Old 07-10-13, 04:27 PM   #14
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I've decided to buy the Trek FX 7.6 as I begin my adventure back on a bike. After the bike there are other considerations: tires, seats, pedals, a pump, computer, helmet and clothing. I'm seventy-one. I'm not interested in PRs or competition. Perhaps when I was in my thirties and forties, but I'm in this for the enjoyment and fitness.

Good choice. There are others, some cheaper and some more expensive, but if the 7.6 has the features, ride and component quality, and most important, fit you are looking for, who are we to second guess your decision?

Just which accessories and gear are 'good enough?' What benefit or advantage are pedals with clip-ons? When are they helpful to use if I never ride over twenty miles or so at a time?

Do you mean clipless or toe clips? If you mean clipless, they are helpful for just about any ride over 3 or 4 miles.

Tires. I see widths all over the place. I understand a wider tire will give a wider surface patch.The FX 7.6 seems pretty thin so I asked the LBS about swapping out the originals for, say 32mm. Would that size be good for the type riding we've discussed?

The 7.6 comes with 25 mm tires, which is narrow, but not super narrow. You could try those and see how you like them. 28 mm is a nice compromise between comfort, durability and speed, as is 32. It all depends on you, and the type of riding you do. If you have lots of broken up pavement and or road debris on your preferred routes, a slightly wider tire may be slightly more durable and/or comfortable, at the expense of speed.

Seats, there are so many different brands and types. I gather that each person's posterior is unique. Like shoes, I figure that you have to find one which will work best. However, where do you start?

How about with the stock saddle? Or just get a Brooks B17 to take you into your golden years.
I assume the pump helmet and clothing are individual preferences which will fill the bill as long as you buy a reasonably priced item and not shoot for the bottom.

Yes.
Computer...really? I use a Smasung Galaxy S3 which has a data plan. I have Copilot which reads the GPS receiver and has a built-in map to display my location. I also use Google's My Tracks which plots out the path on a map and stores speed, average speed, distance and elevation for each route. (I actually use that one for photography uploading the track into Lightroom) I know about the drain on the phone to perform these functions but I have an external backup battery which has over two full charges capacity. Will this be sufficient?

It may be, though my experience with iphone is that these mapping apps suck power, which might not be such a good thing if you need your phone in the unlikely event of an emergency. Basic wired bike computers are pretty cheap these days and last for years.
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Old 07-10-13, 04:53 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post

Good choice. There are others, some cheaper and some more expensive, but if the 7.6 has the features, ride and component quality, and most important, fit you are looking for, who are we to second guess your decision?
Hi,

We are not second guessing, we are offering advice. Which is compare
the 7.4 to the 7.6 and at 71 years of age work out if the 7.6 is really
a better bike for you. I don't think it is. But if the OP is set on the
7.6 fair enough, get what you want, but my opinion will not change.

Which is the OP would probably prefer the the 7.4 over the 7.6,
that is somewhat second guessing, but also informed opinion.

Given the disparity in the prices, it is good advice to consider.

rgds, sreten.

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Old 07-10-13, 05:06 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sreten View Post
Hi,

We are not second guessing, we are offering advice. Which is compare
the 7.4 to the 7.6 and at 71 years of age work out if the 7.6 is really
a better bike for you. I don't think it is. But if the OP is set on the
7.6 fair enough, get what you want, but my opinion will not change.

rgds, sreten.
You are probably right. 7.6 gets you a flat bar road bike with 10 speed very wide gearing, and lighter weight higher end components. But, the 7.4 components are probably good enough for anything you are likely to ask of a hybrid, or its rider. The super wide range rear cassette actually does strike me as something that might suit an older person pretty well. $800 for the 7.4 seems like a reasonable price point for a hybrid, and if it were me, for $1,300, I would be looking for a road bike, but that is me. I went on a group ride today and one of the riders had a Trek FX 7.9. I wouldn't pay $3k for a full carbon hybrid, but this guy really likes his, and it is suited for the sort of riding he likes to do.

Last edited by MRT2; 07-10-13 at 05:12 PM.
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Old 07-10-13, 05:32 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
You are probably right. 7.6 gets you a flat bar road bike with 10 speed very wide gearing, and lighter weight higher end components. But, the 7.4 components are probably good enough for anything you are likely to ask of a hybrid, or its rider. The super wide range rear cassette actually does strike me as something that might suit an older person pretty well. $800 for the 7.4 seems like a reasonable price point for a hybrid, and if it were me, for $1,300, I would be looking for a road bike, but that is me. I went on a group ride today and one of the riders had a Trek FX 7.9. I wouldn't pay $3k for a full carbon hybrid, but this guy really likes his, and it is suited for the sort of riding he likes to do.
Hi,

The super wide rear cassette goes with a compact double front on the 7.6. The
7.4 has a triple front and simply doesn't need or want a super wide rear cassette.

rgds, sreten.

Last edited by sreten; 07-10-13 at 05:38 PM.
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Old 07-11-13, 01:20 PM   #18
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Well I pulled the trigger on a Trek FX 7.6. It should be ready late Tuesday or Wednesday. I upgraded the tires to 32mm and am getting the standard seat. I also bought a fluid trainer to supplement my elliptic training. Thank goodness that's over and thanks for the advice.

Rich

Last edited by Rich Gibson; 07-15-13 at 07:37 AM. Reason: correct error
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Old 07-18-13, 03:25 PM   #19
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Too hot to ride today so it's on the trainer till the weekend.

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Old 07-18-13, 03:37 PM   #20
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Nice bike, no doubt about that.......
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Old 07-18-13, 06:11 PM   #21
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Thanks! I have the Kurt trainer for the extremes in heat and cold around here. They publish a speed vs wattage curve so I got the Trek Node 1.1 to track the average speed. Looks like I need about 17 mph average for an 800 calorie/hour workout. Woosh! I've got a lot of work ahead of me.
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