Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and don’t know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. It’s more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, you’ll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here ya’ go…..the location for everything fit related.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-10-13, 05:54 PM   #1
MoreBlackSwan
Member
Thread Starter
 
MoreBlackSwan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: DT Los Angeles
Bikes: 2013 Cannondale CAAD10 5, 90's Scott Hybrid
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Saddle lower than hoods

Hi all, quick question about saddle position relative to hoods:

Recently, I went into multiple LBS's when researching road bikes, all of who suggested 56/58 cm is the appropriate size for me (I'm 6'0")
I ended up buying a CAAD10 56cm and got a fitting done.

My question is - Is it normal to have the saddle lower than the hoods?
The person who did the fitting says that I have short legs and a long torso, and that moving down to a 54 would leave my upper body too cramped.
However, most all other road bikes I see have the saddle much higher than the hoods.
Is this normal?


Pic of bike after fitting:

Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_0693.jpg (57.5 KB, 236 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_0693.jpg (99.1 KB, 577 views)

Last edited by MoreBlackSwan; 07-10-13 at 05:59 PM. Reason: fixed pic
MoreBlackSwan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:07 PM   #2
datlas
Senior Member
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 18,973
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 466 Post(s)
Looks right if you are 75 years old and/or touring.

If not, you may need a smaller frame and/or lower the bars/flip stem.

You sure the saddle is at correct height to allow proper leg extension??
datlas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:11 PM   #3
foresthill 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lafayette, CO
Bikes: MTB: Stumpjumper FSR, Road: De Rosa King 3
Posts: 1,212
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
it depends on how flexible you are and how aggressive you want to be. You do not need to be 75 to decide this is where you want your handlebars, tho.
__________________
2009 De Rosa King 3: Red Shifters, RD, Cranks, Brakes, BB, & Cassette; Force FD; Reynolds DV46c wheels.

2004 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR: X.0 gripshifters, RD; XTR FD, Cranks, Hayes HFX Carbon 9 Brakes; AC 350 Disc Wheels; Manitou Minute 2:00 100mm fork; Fox propedal triad rear shock; WTB weirwolf UST w/Stan's tubeless system.
foresthill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:12 PM   #4
I <3 Robots
Senior Member
 
I <3 Robots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: So Cal
Bikes: Cervelo S2, Workswell 062, Banshee Spitfire
Posts: 1,650
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
What bike shop did the fit for you?
I <3 Robots is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:14 PM   #5
FatherAlabaster
___________
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 217
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Um, how does it feel when you ride it? And you know there's a new "fitting your bike" subforum now, already getting lots of good input.
FatherAlabaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:31 PM   #6
Elduderino2412
Tour De French Fries
 
Elduderino2412's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Bikes: 2010 Cervelo R3 SL & 2013 Airborne Goblin
Posts: 1,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
w/o seeing you on the bike it's just a crap shot, but i'm guessing your legs aren't that short. You should have like a 10-15 degree bend at most when legs are extended. Also your handlebars are rolled to far up. Drops should be parallel to the ground. You will get more flexible the more you cycle. Stretch your back, neck and legs everyday if you can. Maybe he just set the bike up that way until you get more flexible.
Elduderino2412 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:39 PM   #7
justkeepedaling
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Ogden, Utah
Bikes: CAAD 10, Cervelo P2 SL, Focus RG-700, Quintana Roo #101
Posts: 693
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
There's no real reason for this setup unless you are super unflexible and/or on a frame too big (referring to seatpost height). Is your saddle even parallel to the ground?
justkeepedaling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:39 PM   #8
StanSeven
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Delaware shore
Bikes: Cervelo C3, Guru Photon, Waterford, Specialized CX
Posts: 11,929
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
That's hard to believe that's a 56 and you are 6 foot. Unless you have very short legs and little flexibility, it looks way off. Post some pics of you on the bike.

When you said fitting, what did that consist of and how long did it take? Was the shop employee knowledgable?
StanSeven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:47 PM   #9
Nihilum
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Pensacola, FL
Bikes: Cannondale Synapse 7 Sora
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Have you dropped your handlebars down? If not, I'd suggest that as a starting point if you're really looking for a more aggressive geometry. I ride a less aggressive Cannondale Synaspe 7 Sora, but my brother rides a CAAD and he had the same issue. He lowered the handlebars by removing the steering stem spacers.

Question: Did they do an actual fitment (take an hour or more where they take actual body measurements) or did they just do an initial set-up where they just made sure your legs were at the right positions at the bottom and top of your pedal stroke?
Nihilum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:47 PM   #10
RJM
I'm doing it wrong.
 
RJM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 4,558
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 246 Post(s)
Do you find you reach too far for the hoods; are you feeling too stretched out? My bike has the saddle level with the handlebars and it is extremely comfortable, and I can use the drops all day long if I wanted to. I wouldn't judge a fitting by that alone...for sure.


Edited to say that I think your saddle is pointed down a bit much.
RJM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 06:50 PM   #11
Jed19 
Senior Member
 
Jed19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 4,228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As mentioned by datlas, you may start by flipping the stem. That should bring the bars slightly lower than your saddle (all other things being set up correctly). To specifically answer your question though, no, it is not normal to have that kind of setup on a race bike meant specifically for the kind of riding you intend to do.
__________________
Regards,

Jed
Jed19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 07:16 PM   #12
mihlbach
Senior Member
 
mihlbach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Long Island, NY
Bikes:
Posts: 6,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
There are no set rules. You have a lot of room to experiment. Flip your stem and put some of the spacers above the stem. Try numerous configurations and see what works best. Focus in whats comfortable, not what it looks like. Keep in mind, if you are new at this, the optimal setup will be a moving target as your fitness improves.
mihlbach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 07:24 PM   #13
JTGraphics
Senior Member
 
JTGraphics's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: So Cal
Bikes:
Posts: 2,673
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Along with everyones good advice remember it's not about the looks it's about the fit and your comfort, as long as you fill good thats all you shoud be concerned about. If not then seek a good fitter some shops fit you but its an general fitting and might I ask did this shop have all the sizes up and down you were looking for or did they sell you something because thats what was on the floor.
__________________
It may not be fancy but it gets me were I need to go.
http://www.jtgraphics.net/cyclist_bicycles.htm
JTGraphics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 07:44 PM   #14
bikerjp
Beer >> Sanity
 
bikerjp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Colorado
Bikes: 2014 Evo DA2, 2010 Caad9-4, 2011 Synapse-4, 2013 CaadX-disc
Posts: 3,449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Have you measured your cycling inseam? That saddle looks pretty low for someone 6' tall on a 56". I'm 6'3" on a 58 and I have a lot of seat post. Probably could ride a 60-61. Your saddle/bars do not have to conform to any rules but there is a general trend for road bars to be lower than the saddle. If this is properly fit then it's properly fit. However, without some more data (like cycling inseam) it's hard to say. It's possible the shop set you up based on preconceived notions about newer riders rather than something more comprehensive and based on your actual body style and flexibility. A pic of you on the bike would probably help.
bikerjp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 09:16 PM   #15
Nachoman
Senior Member
 
Nachoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Point Loma, CA
Bikes: Bill Holland (Road-Ti), Fuji Roubaix Pro (back-up), Bike Friday (folder), Co-Motion (tandem) & Trek 750 (hybrid)
Posts: 14,089
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
People with short legs have less saddle to bar drop.
__________________
.
.

Two wheels good. Four wheels bad.
Nachoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-13, 11:49 PM   #16
Will Goes Boing
Senior Member
 
Will Goes Boing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 234
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well first off, you have like a bajillion inches worth of spacers AND your stem is at a positive angle. If you want your bars to be lower than your saddle all you have to do is place the spacers on top of the stem instead of below it, and then flip your stem.

I work at a bike shop and from personal experience I have seen some customers that need their saddle really low even with the proper leg extension. For people who are chubby/heavy set the problem seems to amplify drastically.

I agree with the fitter that a 54 would be too cramped for you. If it bugs you that the saddle is so low... do what I said and just flip the stem and slam it.
Will Goes Boing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 01:05 AM   #17
martinus
Senior Member
 
martinus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 939
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreBlackSwan View Post
Hi all, quick question about saddle position relative to hoods:

Recently, I went into multiple LBS's when researching road bikes, all of who suggested 56/58 cm is the appropriate size for me (I'm 6'0")
I ended up buying a CAAD10 56cm and got a fitting done.

My question is - Is it normal to have the saddle lower than the hoods?
The person who did the fitting says that I have short legs and a long torso, and that moving down to a 54 would leave my upper body too cramped.
However, most all other road bikes I see have the saddle much higher than the hoods.
Is this normal?


Pic of bike after fitting:

LOL, I have *short* legs w/ *long* torso.

My current bike looks similar BUT is a 54cm with a 120 stem, with level hoods/bars. If I go with a smaller frame, to get that pro-looking huge seatpost... I would need to get a *huge* stem ...
martinus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 01:45 AM   #18
gaucho777
Senior Member
 
gaucho777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Berkeley, CA
Bikes: '72 Cilo Pacer • '72 Peugeot PX10 • '73 Speedwell Ti • '74 Nishiki Competition • '74 Peugeot UE-8 • '86 Look Equipe 753 • '86 Look KG86 • '89 Parkpre Team Road • '90 Parkpre Team MTB • '90 Merlin
Posts: 5,609
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
No, that set up does not look right to me. You might see the hoods higher than saddle on touring or city bikes (a la the "French Fit," though even then it's usually at or sligtly below saddle level) , but not on a bike such as yours. Plus, the downward saddle angle is just wrong. I'm about your height (5'11") and also have long torso/short legs, but would not want to ride your bike for very long. If that were my bike, I'd start by flipping the stem, leveling the saddle and tilting handlebars forward. Start with a minimal saddle-to-bar drop, and lower as your comfort/flexibility allows. Oh, and ask for a refund from that fitter.
gaucho777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 05:35 AM   #19
Menel
Senior Member
 
Menel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: GA
Bikes: Roubaix, Helix, NailTrail
Posts: 1,149
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreBlackSwan View Post
Hi all, quick question about saddle position relative to hoods:

Recently, I went into multiple LBS's when researching road bikes, all of who suggested 56/58 cm is the appropriate size for me (I'm 6'0")
I ended up buying a CAAD10 56cm and got a fitting done.

My question is - Is it normal to have the saddle lower than the hoods?
The person who did the fitting says that I have short legs and a long torso, and that moving down to a 54 would leave my upper body too cramped.
However, most all other road bikes I see have the saddle much higher than the hoods.
Is this normal?


Pic of bike after fitting:

Get a second local opinion who can see you on it in person.

It may be right, but it looks wrong.
Menel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 07:01 AM   #20
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint
Posts: 14,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)
do you want this ...:

[h=3]nor·mal[/h]/ˈnôrməl/
[TABLE="class: vk_txt ts"]
[TR]
[TD]Adjective
[TABLE="class: ts"]
[TR]
[TD]Conforming to a standard; usual, typical, or expected.[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Noun
[TABLE="class: ts"]
[TR]
[TD]The usual, average, or typical state or condition.[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Synonyms
[TABLE="class: ts"]
[TR]
[TD]adjective. [/TD]
[TD]regular - standard - ordinary - common - usual[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[TABLE="class: ts"]
[TR]
[TD]noun. [/TD]
[TD]normality - normalcy - perpendicular[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

... or what's good for YOU?
rumrunn6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 07:03 AM   #21
martinus
Senior Member
 
martinus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 939
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If the saddle would be level, you wouldnt need the bars rolled up, like that... ( to use, to push yourself back up on to the saddle/your sit bones... since you are prolly sliding off/down, sitting on your giblets. )

That said, dont flip the stem or slam it, that is a fit issue ...
If you like the height on both leave it, but if you need the extra hight from the handlebar beeing rolled up, get a higher angle stem. ( and still keept he bars "level". )

If all else fails, het a "tall headtube bike" ...

Here is a publicity pic of my bike :


Here is how mine, looks:

Last edited by martinus; 07-11-13 at 07:08 AM.
martinus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 07:31 AM   #22
bengreen79
Allez means go.
 
bengreen79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Two Rivers, WI
Bikes:
Posts: 893
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Don't compare your setup to the setup you see on bike photos in magazines. No one is riding those - they're just taking pictures. Instead look how people who are actually riding are setup for a more real life comparison. Even in the tour, some of the guys are using less aggressive setups than some of the guys here. It's no indication of skill.

Yours does look a little "mild" but that doesn't mean it doesn't fit right. My Allez is a 56.5 cm. I tried a 54 but I felt cramped on it. It may have been fixable with a long stem and setback post but at the time I was 45 lbs heavier than I am now and flexibility wasn't a strongpoint of mine.

Edit: For perspective, I'm 5'11.5" and my cycling inseam with shoes on is only ~32 in. Short legs here too.
bengreen79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 07:37 AM   #23
FrenchFit 
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 3,054
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreBlackSwan View Post
Hi all, quick question about saddle position relative to hoods:

Recently, I went into multiple LBS's when researching road bikes, all of who suggested 56/58 cm is the appropriate size for me (I'm 6'0")
I ended up buying a CAAD10 56cm and got a fitting done.

My question is - Is it normal to have the saddle lower than the hoods?
The person who did the fitting says that I have short legs and a long torso, and that moving down to a 54 would leave my upper body too cramped.
However, most all other road bikes I see have the saddle much higher than the hoods.
Is this normal?


Pic of bike after fitting:

Short legs/long torso, new rider and a Clyde ...that's normal. I suspect over time the seat will come up, bars will come down. When I started biking 6-7 years ago that would have been my set-up. Now, saddle position relative to the bars is much higher.

What matters is riding comfort, power, motivated to ride further. If this fit gives you that then it's perfect. Let change come over time.
FrenchFit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 07:41 AM   #24
bianchi10
King Hoternot
 
bianchi10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Oregon City, OR
Bikes: 2015 Cannondale Evo Hi mod
Posts: 5,099
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Whoever did that fitting for you needs to be shot straight in the face. your hoods should not be rolld up that high on the bars. saddle should be flat and if you are 6ft tall and that is a 56, you have got to have one of the longest torso's EVER. that looks set up for someone with a 28" inseem.
bianchi10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-13, 08:01 AM   #25
bikebreak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 618
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Yeah, ride the bike, do stretching (after the ride), gain strength and flexibility.

Your seat will come up and your bars will come down. You may also need to get a longer stem.

In the meantime, google french fit and eddy fit. People really do ride bikes like that.
bikebreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:33 AM.