Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and don’t know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. It’s more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, you’ll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here ya’ go…..the location for everything fit related.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-15-13, 02:57 PM   #1
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Help deciding on frame size. PICS.

Hello Everyone,

I was hoping you guys could take a look at some pics and see if anything jumps out at you. I'm trying to decide between a 52cm (black bar tape) and 54cm (white bar tape). The bike is a Specialized Roubaix. After a rough fitting, the LBS guy said that I could comfortably ride either size frame. So, I took each bike out for a test ride. They both felt good to me. He said he set them up with the same measurements. The only difference I saw was that the 52cm bike had a flipped up stem while the 54cm bike had it in the negative. That's just the way the bikes were assembled, and nothing he did intentionally. So, with that in mind, here are the pics. Hopefully they can be of some use. When I look at them, I don't see much difference in my body position...

Thanks in advance for taking a look. Let me know if I can provide any more information.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_8149.jpg (97.6 KB, 321 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_6058.jpg (96.1 KB, 322 views)
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-13, 03:01 PM   #2
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO
Posts: 29,303
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
White Tape bike
__________________
[SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI
10 Wheels is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-13, 03:16 PM   #3
sreten
Banned.
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brighton UK
Bikes: 20" Folder, Road Bike
Posts: 1,664
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi, the bigger bike, white tape, it's not too big, rgds, sreten.

I see a little more rotation of the torso on the bigger bike,
i.e. your lower back is tilted a little more forward, and
perhaps reading too much into just two pictures, for
the bigger bike your spine has a smoother curve.

For no reason, you look better on the bigger bike.
Thinking about it, a little more stretched out, racier,
at the same time you seem to look a little scrunched
up on the smaller bike, less natural, in comparison.

Last edited by sreten; 07-15-13 at 03:46 PM.
sreten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-13, 03:31 PM   #4
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for the replies so far. When I left the LBS, we kinda settled on the 52cm, but he had to order one in from another store location because the one pictured was too expensive for my budget. And unfortunately, the 54cm bike pictured is cheaper than I wanted to go. So, he'd have to do the same thing again if I change my mind now. I don't think that will be a problem, but it certainly is a pain. I suppose it's worth it to get the right fit.
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-13, 05:57 PM   #5
chaadster
Thread Killer
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Bikes:
Posts: 7,617
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
I agree with Sreten's assessment, but the 52 will be fine, the stem needs lower and longer, that's all.

Last edited by chaadster; 07-15-13 at 06:05 PM.
chaadster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-13, 06:51 PM   #6
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
I agree with Sreten's assessment, but the 52 will be fine, the stem needs lower and longer, that's all.
I will definitely have to ride them both again. Maybe I'll ask the guy to flip that stem over to see if that makes the difference. I hate being in between sizes. Makes it hard to be sure. Thanks again.
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-13, 07:04 PM   #7
FrenchFit 
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 3,015
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
It's not how you look on the bike it's how your perform; two words...Chris Froome.

That said, your center of gravity looks much, much better on the 54cm and you can always shorten the effective reach by flipping or changing the stem. On the smaller bike your butt is hanging out over the rear axle, not so good.
FrenchFit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-13, 08:13 PM   #8
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
It's not how you look on the bike it's how your perform; two words...Chris Froome.

That said, your center of gravity looks much, much better on the 54cm and you can always shorten the effective reach by flipping or changing the stem. On the smaller bike your butt is hanging out over the rear axle, not so good.
Both bikes felt good to me in terms of reach. At least on my short test rides. Even if I drop the stem on the smaller bike, I'll still have axel butt problem...
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-13, 10:26 PM   #9
chaadster
Thread Killer
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Bikes:
Posts: 7,617
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Color me daft, but what is the nature of this 'axle/butt' problem? What's the dynamic? I've never thought of it in a meaningful way, or as an important measure.

Based on my own experience, shorter wheelbases 'buck' a little more over big bumps than longer wheelbases, but in terms of negative impact on performance, I don't have any associations there, aside from feeling shorter wheelbases feel more sporty.

And this from a guy who rides a mini-velo and a folding bike, where my butt is not only way out over the axle, but the whole wheel!
chaadster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-13, 06:21 AM   #10
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Color me daft, but what is the nature of this 'axle/butt' problem? What's the dynamic? I've never thought of it in a meaningful way, or as an important measure.

Based on my own experience, shorter wheelbases 'buck' a little more over big bumps than longer wheelbases, but in terms of negative impact on performance, I don't have any associations there, aside from feeling shorter wheelbases feel more sporty.

And this from a guy who rides a mini-velo and a folding bike, where my butt is not only way out over the axle, but the whole wheel!
Not sure either, but I have no idea what I'm doing. Based on the pics, which I'm sure do not convey the whole story, does one fit look more right to you? Seems most people here would rather see me on the larger bike.

And fwiw my measurements:
5"8' 3/4 tall
31 inch inseam
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-13, 09:03 AM   #11
FrenchFit 
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 3,015
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Speaking about road bikes, like the Roubaix, you want your center of gravity closer to the center of the bike. Too much of your weight over the rear and I think you'll experience the bike laboring in turns, climbing issues and not floating over bumps..more like riding a rear loader tourer than a road bike. As I read it, 50-60% weight on the back wheel is what pro riders shoot for, not to say we should worry about those figures. On the 52cm you look pushed toward the rear. Of course, it could simply be how you are fit on that bike, i.e. the saddle position.
FrenchFit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-13, 09:24 AM   #12
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
Speaking about road bikes, like the Roubaix, you want your center of gravity closer to the center of the bike. Too much of your weight over the rear and I think you'll experience the bike laboring in turns, climbing issues and not floating over bumps..more like riding a rear loader tourer than a road bike. As I read it, 50-60% weight on the back wheel is what pro riders shoot for, not to say we should worry about those figures. On the 52cm you look pushed toward the rear. Of course, it could simply be how you are fit on that bike, i.e. the saddle position.
True. My understanding was that saddle positioning was adjusted based on my leg extension. So I'm not sure that moving it forward is the right thing to do. It may just be that I need the larger frame. When I tried the drop position on the smaller bike, I got the sensation that I was leaning out over the front tire quite a bit. On the larger bike my weight felt more evenly distributed. Not sure if that is anything to go by.
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-13, 09:29 AM   #13
ThermionicScott 
Gratuitous glib and snark
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)
Posts: 13,169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
+1 for the larger frame.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-13, 09:58 AM   #14
FrenchFit 
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 3,015
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by apetro3 View Post
True. My understanding was that saddle positioning was adjusted based on my leg extension. So I'm not sure that moving it forward is the right thing to do. It may just be that I need the larger frame. When I tried the drop position on the smaller bike, I got the sensation that I was leaning out over the front tire quite a bit. On the larger bike my weight felt more evenly distributed. Not sure if that is anything to go by.
Well, it gets complicated from here. Saddle position fore/aft, up and down, determines whether your upper body is unweighted and you can efficiently produce power. You can find that sweet spot relative to the crank on different sized bikes, but if the frame is a mis-fit your center of gravity relative to the frame is in the wrong place and your reach to the bars may create shoulder and neck problems, or you end up cramped & slow.

I say, if you are going to plunk down good money for your #1 road bike get the opinion of a knowledgeable fitter to advise you about size up or size down on that frame. You won't get a do over, and riding a mis-fit bike can be a long term annoyance.
FrenchFit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-13, 11:15 AM   #15
Phil_gretz
Bike Commuter in training
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Bikes: '88 Fuji Saratoga, '12 Jamis Sputnik, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite
Posts: 3,774
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Larger Frame, Invert The Stem

I like your proportions on the larger (white tape) 54 cm frame. I would recommend that you flip the stem upward, though, until you are more experienced on the bike. I'd also like to see more elbow bend and relaxed hands...
Phil_gretz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-13, 03:23 PM   #16
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
I like your proportions on the larger (white tape) 54 cm frame. I would recommend that you flip the stem upward, though, until you are more experienced on the bike. I'd also like to see more elbow bend and relaxed hands...
Thanks for your feedback. Regarding elbow bend and relaxed hands, is that something I need to do myself, or is it an adjustment of the bike?
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-13, 07:05 PM   #17
sreten
Banned.
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brighton UK
Bikes: 20" Folder, Road Bike
Posts: 1,664
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by apetro3 View Post
Thanks for your feedback. Regarding elbow bend and relaxed hands, is
that something I need to do myself, or is it an adjustment of the bike?
Hi,

It comes with just riding a bike a lot, no effort.
And with bars lower than you start with, generally.

rgds, sreten.

Last edited by sreten; 07-17-13 at 07:12 PM.
sreten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-13, 08:43 PM   #18
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks, I will keep that in mind as I go.
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-13, 05:47 AM   #19
Phil_gretz
Bike Commuter in training
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Bikes: '88 Fuji Saratoga, '12 Jamis Sputnik, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite
Posts: 3,774
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sreten View Post
Hi,

It comes with just riding a bike a lot, no effort.
And with bars lower than you start with, generally.

rgds, sreten.
Yes. It's intentional as to you hold your posture and engage your core muscles. Just relieves pressure from your hands/wrists. PG

Last edited by Phil_gretz; 07-18-13 at 10:56 AM. Reason: relieves instead of takes
Phil_gretz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-13, 12:07 PM   #20
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997
Posts: 6,922
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Try a bigger one. Even w/ the 54 cm/white tape bike, you look a little cramped in saddle-to-bar dimension. Not bad but why not try a 56 cm? Get down in the drops and pedal hard, see if you can stretch out comfortably or if your midsection feels cramped, knees overlap elbows too much, etc.
jyl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-13, 12:43 PM   #21
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hadn't even considered a 56. I know with the 54 I can feel the top tube when I stand over the bike. Not uncomfortable or anything, but definitely there. I suppose it's worth a try.
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 03:16 AM   #22
igknighted
Senior Member
 
igknighted's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Somerville, MA
Bikes:
Posts: 414
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As a general rule, racers will find that buying the smaller bike and making it longer gives them a better range of fit options, and handling characteristics that are preferable for racing. At the same time, a rider who is just looking to get out and enjoy the ride will likely do better buying the bigger size and shortening the reach if need be. One of the major determining factors for me is how hard you plan to push down on the pedals.

A racer will plan to put a lot of force on the pedals a good portion of the time, and because of this the legs will take a lot of weight that would go to the hands. As a result, you can ride a lower front end position without adding any weight to your hands. Also, a racer will need to get up and sprint. When sprinting, a higher bar/torso setup makes it difficult to get leverage to apply as much force as possible to the pedals. A smaller frame size with a longer stem keeps the rider low over the front wheel to increase steering responsiveness, and allows a lower bar position due to shorter frame stack.

A recreational rider is not typically putting as much force to the pedals, meaning that same low position results in more weight for the hands and back to support on their own. The bigger frame has a taller head tube, so the bars are easier to mount higher. Also, how the bike sprints is usually much less of an issue. This position will generally have more forgiving handling as well. Imagine you ride through a patch of sand... you will be more likely to emerge out the other side unscathed if you shift your weight back (which a larger frame size & shorter stem will help do), and this holds true to most handling situations that can get novice road cyclists in trouble.

In the end, your shop is right. You could ride either bike, and in most cases you would never look back and think "what if I got the other size". Judging by your comments, it seems you enjoyed the feel of the 54 better, so I am curious as to why you then ordered the 52... is there something that felt better about that size that you haven't mentioned yet?

PS - would it be the end of the world if you rode a 56 around? Not really. But for someone who thought the 52 was a better fit than the 54 to all of a sudden want a 56 would be a huge red flag to me. Your pictures above do give a vague idea of what your position is like, but there are too many variables in distance to subject and angle that I wouldn't draw any in depth conclusions about what adjustments I would make... but I see nothing at all in those pictures (and more importantly how you felt about each) to suggest trying a 56.

Since you are looking at Specialized, your shop almost certainly has a BG fitter. Talk to him or her. The shop clearly is not trying to simply sell you inventory that they have, as they are ordering either size anyways, so I would feel pretty confident that they are (1) unbiased enough to give you straight answers, and (2) in a better position to give you real answers than a bunch of people looking at one tiny snapshot online.
igknighted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 05:50 AM   #23
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Bikes:
Posts: 12,264
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sreten View Post
Hi, the bigger bike, white tape, it's not too big, rgds, sreten.

I see a little more rotation of the torso on the bigger bike,
i.e. your lower back is tilted a little more forward, and
perhaps reading too much into just two pictures, for
the bigger bike your spine has a smoother curve.

For no reason, you look better on the bigger bike.
Thinking about it, a little more stretched out, racier,
at the same time you seem to look a little scrunched
up on the smaller bike, less natural, in comparison.
For once I agree with sreten. I think you do look better on the white tape bike, slightly flatter back - it allows you to be more stretched out, and probably has a little longer top tube, or what they now call reach (horizontal distance from the top of the head tube to a plumb line to the BB). I'd also think about fit evolution - how is your fit preference likely to change, barring abnormalities. Mainly, choose the bike for which your saddle is less slammed back, that has the shallower seat tube angle. You are in a moderately aggressive position on these two bikes, and I think you will want to dig in lower as you get used to the bike. That will probably result in slowly pushing the saddle back and down a bit, with the bars moving forward as you want to get more aero, with comfort.
Road Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 06:41 AM   #24
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by igknighted View Post
As a general rule, racers will find that buying the smaller bike and making it longer gives them a better range of fit options, and handling characteristics that are preferable for racing. At the same time, a rider who is just looking to get out and enjoy the ride will likely do better buying the bigger size and shortening the reach if need be. One of the major determining factors for me is how hard you plan to push down on the pedals.

A racer will plan to put a lot of force on the pedals a good portion of the time, and because of this the legs will take a lot of weight that would go to the hands. As a result, you can ride a lower front end position without adding any weight to your hands. Also, a racer will need to get up and sprint. When sprinting, a higher bar/torso setup makes it difficult to get leverage to apply as much force as possible to the pedals. A smaller frame size with a longer stem keeps the rider low over the front wheel to increase steering responsiveness, and allows a lower bar position due to shorter frame stack.

A recreational rider is not typically putting as much force to the pedals, meaning that same low position results in more weight for the hands and back to support on their own. The bigger frame has a taller head tube, so the bars are easier to mount higher. Also, how the bike sprints is usually much less of an issue. This position will generally have more forgiving handling as well. Imagine you ride through a patch of sand... you will be more likely to emerge out the other side unscathed if you shift your weight back (which a larger frame size & shorter stem will help do), and this holds true to most handling situations that can get novice road cyclists in trouble.

In the end, your shop is right. You could ride either bike, and in most cases you would never look back and think "what if I got the other size". Judging by your comments, it seems you enjoyed the feel of the 54 better, so I am curious as to why you then ordered the 52... is there something that felt better about that size that you haven't mentioned yet?

PS - would it be the end of the world if you rode a 56 around? Not really. But for someone who thought the 52 was a better fit than the 54 to all of a sudden want a 56 would be a huge red flag to me. Your pictures above do give a vague idea of what your position is like, but there are too many variables in distance to subject and angle that I wouldn't draw any in depth conclusions about what adjustments I would make... but I see nothing at all in those pictures (and more importantly how you felt about each) to suggest trying a 56.

Since you are looking at Specialized, your shop almost certainly has a BG fitter. Talk to him or her. The shop clearly is not trying to simply sell you inventory that they have, as they are ordering either size anyways, so I would feel pretty confident that they are (1) unbiased enough to give you straight answers, and (2) in a better position to give you real answers than a bunch of people looking at one tiny snapshot online.
Thank you for the in-depth reply. I am not a racer, and am not interested at this point in becoming one. That said, I do intend to do some real work on this thing. Lots of hills, mainly. And when it is flat I would like to push into the upper teens/ low 20s for as long ad I can. My terrain really won't allow much of that however.

I rode each of these frames one time, back to back. And I really do not have a good frame of reference for what a proper fit should feel like. When the LBS guy said either frame will work I simply thought smaller would be better due to the lighter weight. But reflecting back on my test rides after the fact, I started to recall some differences. Primarily when in the drops. Really, I need to ride both sizes again. And pay better attention to the differences.

This is what I intend to do later this week when I get back from vacation.
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-13, 06:53 AM   #25
apetro3
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
For once I agree with sreten. I think you do look better on the white tape bike, slightly flatter back - it allows you to be more stretched out, and probably has a little longer top tube, or what they now call reach (horizontal distance from the top of the head tube to a plumb line to the BB). I'd also think about fit evolution - how is your fit preference likely to change, barring abnormalities. Mainly, choose the bike for which your saddle is less slammed back, that has the shallower seat tube angle. You are in a moderately aggressive position on these two bikes, and I think you will want to dig in lower as you get used to the bike. That will probably result in slowly pushing the saddle back and down a bit, with the bars moving forward as you want to get more aero, with comfort.
Yes I definitely intend to adopt a more aggressive stance on either frame. On an average ride I spend about 1.5 to 2 hours in the saddle. So likely will not want to go to the extreme. My typical 20-mile ride includes about 1,400 feet of climbing. And that also means some pretty extreme downhill too. Hitting 40mph + is something that can happen regularly.
apetro3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:23 AM.