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Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and don’t know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. It’s more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, you’ll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here ya’ go…..the location for everything fit related.

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Old 10-17-13, 09:30 AM   #1
CommuteCommando
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Seat adjustment solved perineal pain, but now. . .

I am getting increased hand pain.

I rotated the saddle very slightly forward, about 1-2 degrees, and moved it back about 1 1/2 cm. Now, when riding in the hoods, I find myself resting against the back of the hoods with way more force than I ever have before. Is there a way to address this without moving the seat back to where I was getting too much pressure on the perineum (area just behind scrotum). The pain there usually started about mile thirty of longer rides. Does anyone have experience with this? This weekend I will start experimenting with moving the seat forward toward it's original position 1/2 cm at a time.
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Old 10-17-13, 09:47 AM   #2
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Great that you got rid of the more serious pain!
In some respects you have to choose your poison.
Your weight is on your butt perineum and your hands- some on your feet
You got it off your perineum -put it more on your "butt" but you are now canted forward a bit more-wedged sliding forward a bit-so more weight on hands.
You could raise the stem or handlebar a bit-putting more weight on your "butt"
but of course that is somewhat less aero efficient.

Sometimes I literally slide to the side-and sit on my thighs a bit-lopsided pedal stroke of course...but
I don't think there is a great solution
My guess is most serious riders here -kid themselves -they pretend they aren't putting weight on their perineum-when they actually are-and they pretend they aren't damaging their equipment-because they don't get pain or numbness.

A saddle with a nose-?? The nose is supporting your perineum-heck that is what the nose if for?? Isn't decorative!!

I once had a THE SEAT saddle-no nose- it took some-a LOT- of getting used to-it puts a huge load on your hands arms-
There are also those two part saddles-take some getting used to also.
BIG PROBLEM- no good solution-
Other than recumbent-which are too low for my taste-can't see cares texting folks door openers who are going to kill me-
comfortable but too low for streets
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Old 10-17-13, 02:00 PM   #3
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I've found I can move the saddle front to back quite a bit and still be moderately comfortable. But if I tilt the saddle nose up or down just a tiny bit, It can make a huge difference. Also, if I lower the bar a centimeter or two, It is necessary for me to adjust the tilt again. I have come to think that the optimum fit is a moving target dependent on typical ride length, physical fitness, the saddle and any number of things that continually change.
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Old 10-18-13, 06:45 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CommuteCommando View Post
I am getting increased hand pain.

I rotated the saddle very slightly forward, about 1-2 degrees, and moved it back about 1 1/2 cm. Now, when riding in the hoods, I find myself resting against the back of the hoods with way more force than I ever have before. Is there a way to address this without moving the seat back to where I was getting too much pressure on the perineum (area just behind scrotum). The pain there usually started about mile thirty of longer rides. Does anyone have experience with this? This weekend I will start experimenting with moving the seat forward toward it's original position 1/2 cm at a time.
If you moved your saddle back, your back is probably now angled farther forward than before. That's good, you are now more aero. But your shoulders are lowered, and your bars are at the same height. I suspect if you lower your bars maybe 1 cm you'll get a reduction in hand pressure, not an increase.
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Old 10-18-13, 06:49 PM   #5
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I find if I try to get a bit more bend in the elbow my arms stay looser and the weight on the hands is reduced.
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Old 10-19-13, 08:24 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phoebeisis View Post
You could raise the stem or handlebar a bit-putting more weight on your "butt" but of course that is somewhat less aero efficient.
Fortunately I am pretty comfortable in the drops, and it is the best position for me hands wise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phoebeisis View Post
Sometimes I literally slide to the side-and sit on my thighs a bit-lopsided pedal stroke of course...but I don't think there is a great solution
I did this for years, and never had a problem. Now that I have a new, well fit, bike, this in no longer comfortable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phoebeisis View Post
My guess is most serious riders here -kid themselves -they pretend they aren't putting weight on their perineum-when they actually are-and they pretend they aren't damaging their equipment-because they don't get pain or numbness.

A saddle with a nose-?? The nose is supporting your perineum-heck that is what the nose if for?? Isn't decorative!! . . . There are also those two part saddles-take some getting used to also. BIG PROBLEM- no good solution-
I have had guys talk up Brooks saddles. Just looking at them, I’m skeptical. It may be a throwback to the old “ten speed” days. Those that I tried either had hard leather saddles, or like mine, hard plastic with a thin sheet of polyurethane foam and quilted cover.
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Old 10-19-13, 08:49 AM   #7
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Yeah
No really good solution
since bikes are designed to be straddled
Very old style-bolt upright-big wide soft seat-with a cut out or depression in the perineal area-is my current solution.
I did use a THE SEAT for quite a while until it broke
but it was uncomfortable enough that I never replaced it
and when I got a HUGE ,Heavy, Coil springs, goofy looking Cloud 9 saddle on some flip bike I bought-I tried it-and sitting upright-old style bars-upright posture
and it is most comfortable-
but it offends the latent eight weenie in me-at least 1100 grams-maybe more.

So you did the sit on one thigh them another thigh also?? I thought I was the only one that did that for prolonged periods??
In truth-that MIGHT be the ONLY way to keep weight off your perineum if you ride the aero way- that or perhaps a THE SEAT- but you have to sit with just the bony BUTT BONE parts of your pelvis touching-and that means you are CONSTANTLY slipping forward



We just aren't built to straddle a nosed saddle safely-
doubt it is any picnic for women either-perhaps even worse-cystitis etc-trauma to the opening of their urethra-and sweat and movement will wash bacteria to the traumatized irritated urethral

Before the Cloud 9 I would tilt my saddles waaaay nose down-meaning I would constantly be sliding down-and putting LOTS of weight on my hands-still point the cloud 9 nose down-but it is so wide and cushy-it holds me in place.

Sorry to run on-no great solution-I have put lots of thought $$ into it over the years-(because I suspect I narrowed my urethra years ago riding a horrible unicantor plastic shell for years-rock hard miserable excuse for a saddle)
Oh well-trial and error-
Luck
Charlie
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Old 10-19-13, 09:26 AM   #8
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I had a struggle with this and went crazy, multiple saddles, stems and bars.

Check your seat height and make sure it isn't too high.

.883 x (measured bike inseam) = seat height

Where seat height is from center of crank to top of saddle at the center of the post line.

You should be plus or minus a cm or two, max. I found I was 7cm too high and had been for years.

Fixing this made tilt adjustment easier to sort out as well as fore and aft.

A hundred or so miles post adjustment and I'm more comfortable cycling than I've ever been before.
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Old 10-22-13, 05:17 PM   #9
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There are LOTS of saddles with a cutout or groove down the center to prevent perineal pressure. Don't compromise tilt to eliminate that pressure, and consequently increase the load on your hands.

Brook saddles work great for many as-is, but they are generally intended for bikes with the bars at saddle height, or higher. They also now offer Imperial versions of some models, which have a center cutout, and Selle An-Anatomica saddles have that feature, too. My Brooks B-17 was cutout by SAA years ago (before there were the current generation of Imperials), and is incredibly comfortable on the Rambouillet with higher bars. The SAA on my Miyata is quite comfy, too, and has longer rails to work with that bike's steeper ST angle, but its not as nice as the B-17 in some respects. I've just purchased a Fizik Aliante Versus (means that it has a groove) for the Marinoni, but haven't ridden it more than up and down the street, but there is no pressure down there.
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Old 11-01-13, 08:55 AM   #10
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I'm no expert on bike fit but I'll give my 2 cents worth since I battled the same issues for a few years. Today, I get minor discomfort in the perineum area but only after 100 miles now. I won't go into the whole bike-fit thing but I believe the fore/aft saddle measurements is as important as saddle height. Also, a level saddle is very important because it caters to your sit bones where the pressure and weight should be. That said, in your case, perhaps you could also try swapping stems, like to a shorter one. It would move your bars back so your hands are on the hoods. I also changed to bibs/shorts that had padding only on the sit bone area and very little padding on the perineum area. That also made a significant difference on comfort. I use a Fizik Arione saddle. It's a longer length saddle that enables me to move fore and aft during rides. LBS's usually have demo saddles to try as well (like the cut-out ones).
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Old 11-01-13, 12:48 PM   #11
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Angled seat forward and it helped a little. (Very small adjustment, still nearly horizontal.) When I first bought the bike I had the stem swapped out to solve the hand pain issue.
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Old 11-01-13, 01:22 PM   #12
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Well better hand pain-that always eventually resolves-
than perineal pain or "decreased function"
Not a bad trade!
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