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Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and don’t know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. It’s more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, you’ll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here ya’ go…..the location for everything fit related.

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Old 11-18-13, 08:18 AM   #26
Road Fan
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Originally Posted by daihard View Post
I agree. OTOH, I've read so many sources of information telling you that your saddle is most likely too low if your toe can touch the ground, including the great Sheldon Brown website. Hardly any of them says that it's perfectly possible for someone to have the proper saddle height and still is able to touch the ground, depending upon things like the BB height and foot length. Sure made me wonder if I'm missing something or if I'm that weird compared to others.
I don't think any general statements on this topic can be made without being pure opinion. Some opinions are more valuable than others, such as most of what I've seen from Sheldon's work. But, that particular one cannot be taken as a rule. I say, just set your saddle for comfortable, healthy (for your joints), and efficient pedaling, and devise strategies for how you can stop the bike safely.

But if I see a rider who can stop and put both feet flat while on the saddle, my first intuition is "saddle too low." But not being able to touch is not an indication of "just right!"

I believe it is possible for nearly all riders to put some part of a foot on the ground when stopped with the saddle set correctly. Whether there will be enough foot contact for good stability without twisting or getting off the saddle, I can't predict. But why not just learn to dismount to a two-foot frame straddle when you stop? That strategy is guaranteed to be nearly as stable as standing without a bike.

Last edited by Road Fan; 11-18-13 at 08:23 AM.
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Old 11-19-13, 12:12 AM   #27
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But why not just learn to dismount to a two-foot frame straddle when you stop? That strategy is guaranteed to be nearly as stable as standing without a bike.
Because I don't want to be caught literally flat-footed; I like being first off the line when it's go time...ahead of cars, bikes, EVERYBODY, even the track-standing fixie kids (though I do respect the track stand immensely).

As for stability, do you mean like on windy days? If it's that blustery, then I'll slide forward off the saddle, but I'm still keeping my right foot on the pedal, ready to propel the bike forward.

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Old 11-19-13, 01:32 PM   #28
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If my saddle isn't at the correct height for my leg length, I'm not gonna be comfortable!
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Old 11-20-13, 12:02 AM   #29
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I believe it is possible for nearly all riders to put some part of a foot on the ground when stopped with the saddle set correctly. Whether there will be enough foot contact for good stability without twisting or getting off the saddle, I can't predict. But why not just learn to dismount to a two-foot frame straddle when you stop? That strategy is guaranteed to be nearly as stable as standing without a bike.
Yes, that's what I normally do at a stop now. I used to stand on one toe when the saddle was lower, but with the current height, I'd have to stretch pretty far to reach the ground while on the saddle.
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