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  1. #1
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    Check my sizing (road bike)

    Last weekend I bought my first road bike. I haven't owned a bike in 8 years or so, and outside spinning classes twice a week I haven't done much pedaling.

    I bought from an LBS and was 'fitted' by a local racer. I use fitted in quotations because it was more of me getting on the bike, him doing a walk around, then him saying that it was perfect. For not knowing road bikes, the bike felt fine when I sat on it and when I rode it. I took the bike home and jumped on for a maiden voyage. About 10 minutes into my ride I developed a pain in the neck but kept riding through. I took it out for a 20 mile ride around town, splitting my time equal between the drops and the hoods. The neck pain persisted until I got home, at which point I stretched my neck out. It felt tender after the ride, and a little tender the next day, and no tenderness after that.

    I also had a slight pain in my palms in the drops, which leads me to believe I had too much upper body weight on my hands. Other than the hands and the neck, I had no other discomfort anywhere else and thoroughly enjoyed my ride. I've been out of town the past week so I haven't been able to ride, but I've been reading about sizing and positioning. When I got home I took the bike for a quick 5 minute spin, and noticed if I put my back/head in certain positions I could feel the neck muscles pulling slightly, but in other positions I was able to find a bit more comfort. I just want to see if I have a sizing issue. I know I also need to work on posture, as I have notoriously bad posture when sitting at work all day.

    Thanks for the help.

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  2. #2
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    From the photos, I don't see an obvious sizing problem... probably other things going on (a need to adapt and increase flexibility, a need to work on muscles that have become inactive because of computer use posture...).

    Might help to confirm if you can provide model name, size of bike and your height and cycling inseam.

  3. #3
    In the wind mercator's Avatar
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    Looks fine to me.
    As you get used to the position and improve your fitness, you will likely need to make some small adjustments but the size of the bike is ok.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Igualmente View Post
    From the photos, I don't see an obvious sizing problem... probably other things going on (a need to adapt and increase flexibility, a need to work on muscles that have become inactive because of computer use posture...).

    Might help to confirm if you can provide model name, size of bike and your height and cycling inseam.
    This is a 2015 Scott Speedster 20, size medium (54). I'm 5'11. Cycling inseam is unknown. The LBS said the Scott bikes tend to run a touch bigger than other bikes, so when we were between the 56 and the 54 he suggested the 54.

  5. #5
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    I think the bike size should be fine. If the neck pain persists or worsens, then you might need to look at some exercises and stretching, but it could just be that you are not used to the position (putting your neck in extension while reaching forward and down with your arms).

    Something that people sometimes do if they have persistent problems is flip the stem so it angles upward more, which raises the handlebars. For example, if you have a 110mm stem with a 6 degree angle, flipping it would raise your handlebars nearly an inch and bring them about a quarter inch closer to the saddle. This would result in less reach down and forward to the handlebars. Once you get used to that, you can flip the stem back down. Given that you bought the bike there, the LBS might flip the stem for you for minimal or no fee.
    Last edited by Igualmente; 12-12-14 at 09:23 PM.

  6. #6
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    Took the bike out for a two hour ride today. Neck soreness was minimal. I was trying to stay attentive to keeping my body in a position where I wasnt extending my head/neck too far up

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