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  1. #1
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    Help removing rear axle of Citizen Tokyo *pics*

    Pictures 1 and 2 show both sides of the axle. Does the axle need to come out to replace the freewheel? Reason I ask is because I managed to break the locknut loose on the freewheel side and remove it as shown in pictures 2 and 4, but the FR-5 tool shown fitting my new cassette in picture 3 won't fit in the slot in picture 4. I suppose I need the FR-1 for the old and the FR-5 for the new?

    On the FR-1.2 product page: "Note: This tool is designed to remove thread-on freewheels. It is not to be confused the FR-5 tool which is designed to remove cassette lockrings from freehub bodies."

    Sounds like I do need the FR-1 then...And probably didn't need to remove the locknut on the freewheel side...

    Since I'm keeping the stock 6-speed shifter, when I put the wheel back on the bike, does the chain go around the black 11t cog?

    freewheel1.jpgfreewheel2.jpgfreewheel3.jpgfreewheel4.jpg
    Last edited by fitftw; 05-12-15 at 10:00 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    I am a bit confused about what you are trying to do. It sounds like you hope to remove a freewheel from your current wheel and replace it with a new cassette designed to work on a freehub.

    Removing the rear axle is not necessary in any case. To remove a splined freewheel you might have to remove the locknut and a few spacers, it depends on which freewheel remover tool you have.

    Unfortunately, you can't replace a freewheel with a cassette designed for a freehub. If that is what you are trying to do you need a new rear wheel.

    If you are just trying to replace one freewheel with another then that should work just fine, but you do need the right tool to take off the old one. The easiest way to remove a freewheel is to put the tool in a bench vice and then place the wheel into the tool and use the tire and rim for leverage to remove the old freewheel. You can also do it with a large wrench, but you usually need a cheater-bar in addition to the wrench to get enough leverage to remove the freewheel. Before you put the new freewheel on make sure to grease the threads on the hub and be careful so you don't damage the aluminum threads on the hub. They are pretty fragile.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pine Cone View Post
    I am a bit confused about what you are trying to do. It sounds like you hope to remove a freewheel from your current wheel and replace it with a new cassette designed to work on a freehub.

    Removing the rear axle is not necessary in any case. To remove a splined freewheel you might have to remove the locknut and a few spacers, it depends on which freewheel remover tool you have.

    Unfortunately, you can't replace a freewheel with a cassette designed for a freehub. If that is what you are trying to do you need a new rear wheel.

    If you are just trying to replace one freewheel with another then that should work just fine, but you do need the right tool to take off the old one. The easiest way to remove a freewheel is to put the tool in a bench vice and then place the wheel into the tool and use the tire and rim for leverage to remove the old freewheel. You can also do it with a large wrench, but you usually need a cheater-bar in addition to the wrench to get enough leverage to remove the freewheel. Before you put the new freewheel on make sure to grease the threads on the hub and be careful so you don't damage the aluminum threads on the hub. They are pretty fragile.

    Good luck!
    Caveat: Old guy at my LBS who has removed a billion frozen freewheels told me not to grease the threads. He says it just lets the freewheel move a bit tighter over time, making it dang near impossible to break free later. Now you know.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Remi View Post
    Caveat: Old guy at my LBS who has removed a billion frozen freewheels told me not to grease the threads. He says it just lets the freewheel move a bit tighter over time, making it dang near impossible to break free later. Now you know.
    Actually I am that old guy. You are trying to slow down the chemical reaction associated with the different metals, aluminum and steel. Without grease, oil or anti-seaze you make things worse. Nothing to do with whether it gets tighter or not over time. Rebuilt my first bike about 1962. Worked as a bike mechanic 1982-1987, worked on a lot of bikes since then. Your mileage may vary

  5. #5
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    I read elsewhere on the forum that a member did indeed swap the stock 14-28t freewheel for an 11-28t cassette on this same bike, which is why I'm attempting to do it as well.

    I'll let you know if it works tomorrow when the tool comes in.

  6. #6
    Senior Member blakcloud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fitftw View Post
    I read elsewhere on the forum that a member did indeed swap the stock 14-28t freewheel for an 11-28t cassette on this same bike, which is why I'm attempting to do it as well.

    I'll let you know if it works tomorrow when the tool comes in.
    As Pine Cone said this cannot be done. You can change freewheel to freewheel, cassette to cassette or change out your freewheel hub and replace with a cassette hub but you cannot intermix them.

  7. #7
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    Is there a how-to on replacing a freewheel hub with a cassette hub?

    Otherwise it looks like I have a useless cassette and my only option is a 13t freewheel since the 11t is discontinued for some stupid reason...

    Can one less tooth really make a big difference in top speed?
    Last edited by fitftw; 05-16-15 at 05:42 AM.

  8. #8
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    You need to build or buy a wheel with a cassette hub, which personally I wouldn't bother with. I would go with the 13t freewheel - yes, you will notice a bit higher top speed - and put the cassette on Craigslist.

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