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  1. #26
    Bicycling Gnome
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    I'd have thought a Downtube mini, a Brompton, or its cheap clone the Merc would be more practical and robust. I think all of these are lighter too. The Brompton and the Merc are very capable, practical cycles which I have ridden extensively, and I believe the DT mini is as well. I own a Merc and have done more than 1500 miles on it with very little trouble. That riding means the equivalent of burning over half a million calories and is enough to be sure that my weight is twenty pounds less than it would have been if I hadn't done it. If you are out of shape, you are doing the right thing.

    I haven't ridden a Downtube mini, but it is well recommended in threads on here. If you are in the states the DT wiill be cheap and easy to get. I'm not sure how small it folds. In my view any practical properly engineered transprt for an adult is goung to weigh a least 25 pounds. Less than that and I doubt it would be made of proper engineering materials. Stuff that is built like a folding child buggy will likely become a sickening disappointment. I well remember my dad buying a bike with plastic wheels when he retired. On the face of it, the belt drive and the folding ability seemed great ideas. In practice, the thing was a pathetic waste of money.
    Last edited by EvilV; 05-28-07 at 05:13 AM.

  2. #27
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    Hello,

    Look at that:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptfBtjGE7jA

    Arno

  3. #28
    Senior Member
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    Cool fold, and the video does a good job of showing its agility.

    Unfortunate that it also shows how to ride a Mobiky like an idiot, wearing headphones all the while. But we already have a term for cyclists like that - we call them "organ donors".
    Last edited by dmnobrien; 06-20-07 at 11:55 PM.

  4. #29
    Bicycling Gnome
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    Quote Originally Posted by arno
    I'm grinning a wide grin after watching it. Looks great, but I wonder how long it would last being ridden like that.

  5. #30
    Bicycling Gnome
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmnobrien
    Cool fold, and the video does of good job of showing its agility.

    Unfortunate that it also shows how to ride a Mobiky like an idiot, wearing headphones all the while. But we already have a term for cyclists like that - we call them "organ donors". ;^)
    Yes, I wondered about the reaction of pedestrians as he swerved right in front of them at fifteen miles an hour on the pavements and then shot into the road at right angles to the traffic flow.

  6. #31
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    I remember hearing something about a MoBike with 16" wheels (Besides the hint on "my16" banner). Does anybody know anything about them?

    14R

  7. #32
    Bicycling Gnome
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokeyrules
    From the perspective of a short person 5'0". I just got my Mobiky today, one of the dealers listed on the website was selling them for $599. I only hope Mobiky is not coming out with an upgraded or lighter model in the next year or I'll cry.

    Anyway, this is a very cool, unusual bike. It folds extremely easily, and the folding is easier and more intuitive than the Handybike that I just bought, the Brompton I test drove and the Dahon Helios that I own. The seat is very comfortable and the ride feels very stable, shifting is easy. I took it home and was immediately able to ride it, I didn't have to make any adjustments. Also, I didn't have to read the handbook to figure out how to fold it.

    The only drawback is that the canvas sack it comes with is more of a cover, it is not a carrying case. But they sell some kind of quilted carry case on various websites made for it.

    For those of you who like bikes that look cool, I think the Mobiky wins on that account too. Very cool bike, very rideable for the short distance flat terrain rider.

    Come back and give us another review when you've had it a little while and put some miles on it will you please smokeyrules? The fact that you have other folders will make your perspectives on longer term ownership really useful.

    I have to say I was impressed with the look of this thing

  8. #33
    Tuck Fexas SoonerLater's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 14R
    I remember hearing something about a MoBike with 16" wheels (Besides the hint on "my16" banner). Does anybody know anything about them?

    14R
    If you read up this thread to October '06 you'll see a pic from last year's Interbike Show where (what I presume to be prototypes of) a "My12" and a "My16" were shown. I guess they didn't get enough interest, because if you Google for Mobiky and My12 or My16, you won't find anything which indicates that they've ever gone into regular production.

  9. #34
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    My opinion after about a year

    Quote Originally Posted by EvilV
    Come back and give us another review when you've had it a little while and put some miles on it will you please smokeyrules? The fact that you have other folders will make your perspectives on longer term ownership really useful.

    I have to say I was impressed with the look of this thing

    So I have now ridden both the Mobiky and the Downtube Mini for about a year. Both have their uses. I did give away my Dahon Helios, so that says something. The Dahon was not comfortable and didn't feel stable for me, a 5'0" female user, I felt too stretched out.

    The Mobiky is fine for flat riding, like a parking lot to a subway/building, of 1 mile or less, it is not suitable for hills and is not fast or that maneuverable. Its advantages lie in the fact that it folds extremely easily and is storable in that position easily. The Downtube Mini is by far more versatile, it is comfortable, fun to ride, and suitable for much longer rides, but I would still not recommend it for very hilly areas, for this a mountain bike would be better, and I would use my Trek Fuel 90 (2bl suspension) for this. The downside of the Downtube is that although folding is quick, after being folded it doesn't fold up in a nice storable package like the Mobiky. I have kept the Downtube in the back of my car and not the Mobiky, which says something, but the Downtube takes up more space in the back and because of its shape, it seems to rattle around more.

    In conclusion, I think both are nice to have and serve two different purposes. If you only have a mile or two to travel and can bring your bike inside, the Mobiky might be better. If you want something more versatile, something you could use on weekends also to go to the store, etc, the Downtube is better.

    I am now looking into maybe getting a flat foot bike.

  10. #35
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokeyrules
    ... The Dahon was not comfortable and didn't feel stable for me, a 5'0" female user, I felt too stretched out.

    .. The Downtube Mini is by far more versatile, it is comfortable, fun to ride, and suitable for much longer rides, but I would still not recommend it for very hilly areas, for this a mountain bike would be better, and I would use my Trek Fuel 90 (2bl suspension) for this.

    I am now looking into maybe getting a flat foot bike.
    My wife is 5' 6", & her Strida is the only bike she's found so far where the arm reach is just right, so she'll be interested to read that, thanks.

    Can you expand on "hilly areas"? For example, do you feel the range of the hub gears isn't enough, or are there other things?

    Presumably the "flat foot" bike won't be a folder?

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclistjohn
    My wife is 5' 6", & her Strida is the only bike she's found so far where the arm reach is just right, so she'll be interested to read that, thanks.

    Can you expand on "hilly areas"? For example, do you feel the range of the hub gears isn't enough, or are there other things?

    Presumably the "flat foot" bike won't be a folder?
    Hilly areas for me constitute a pretty steep grade. I live in California and we have a lot of hills near the coast where I live. I just have to work too hard to get up the hills, obviously, as compared to my MTB.

    I'm looking at the Rans fusion for a flat foot bike, because once again, my height seems to be a limitation. On the Electra Townie and Specialized versions, my toes just touch the ground. I"m not even sure the Rans will be low enough though. I've read the specs on the Strida, its not recommended even for people my height. Sigh.

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