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Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

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Old 09-28-06, 03:01 PM   #1
matt52
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Much fuss over aristocrat on folder

Relative of Queen takes daughter through rush hour London traffic on Strida3...woah....


Tabloid press fuming...Strida rather pleased...
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Old 09-28-06, 03:12 PM   #2
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I give him credit for bringing his kid to school personally, plus going by bike... but if he's going to tote a kid along, he should really be using the proper equipment. Neat to see a member of the nobility riding a folding bike.

Honestly, I'd have predicted that he'd be riding an Alex Moulton, or a Brompton.

Brits, chime in. Would a Brompton be seen as "too pedestrian" for a royal? Pun unintentional.
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Old 09-28-06, 03:15 PM   #3
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Maybe Yan should send one of the un-sold British shipment of Downtubes as a present. The 2006 racks are a lot more beefy than the 2005 racks, and I'll bet could hold a child-seat quite readily.

And it'd be a *big* boost in publicity if someone of note got photographed on one of those bikes.
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Old 09-28-06, 03:48 PM   #4
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Isn't that guy this guy? What he really needs is an Xtracycle.
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Old 09-28-06, 04:21 PM   #5
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Yes, its Lord Linley...
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Old 09-28-06, 06:26 PM   #6
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Haha I saw this in LondonLite (crap new free paper here)
What a fuss. I'm riding to chelsea myself and its ok as long as you don't get run down by the sloanes in their Chelsea Tractors (Range Rovers) as they nip into Peter Jones for new Napkin rings...
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Old 09-28-06, 10:59 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spambait11
Isn't that guy this guy? What he really needs is an Xtracycle.
Ha, Ha! I thought the same thing! She really needs a footsie to rest her feet on safely! And he could use a helmet too!
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Old 09-29-06, 02:28 AM   #8
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I think the guy is a hero - when many people still use a 4x4 to take their kids 500yrds to school in UK. ( I just love that ad)
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Old 09-29-06, 07:34 AM   #9
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I feel sorry for the poor girl. He really needs a child seat and a utility bicycle.
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Old 09-29-06, 07:59 AM   #10
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Never heard of this guy, myself, but obviously, it's about his connection to the royal family, not the safety factor. I wouldn't carry a small child this way, but then, I'm a worry-wart. Not that big a deal.
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Old 09-30-06, 02:36 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simple Simon
I think the guy is a hero - when many people still use a 4x4 to take their kids 500yrds to school in UK. ( I just love that ad)
I totally agree; he is. The 4*4's around here seem to be used *solely* for that purpose; they park on pavements, & block cycle paths.

He's a bright chap, & wouldn't endanger his daughter's life. He's probably done several test runs to make sure she feels comfortable on the bike. Note his daughter *is* wearing a helmet. I bet she loves the thrill of a bikeride to school. I'd say he's a responsible parent showing some respect for our environment.

A Moulton would probably take him too long to fold & unfold, & low maintenance on the Strida probably suits him better than folder alternatives :-)
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Old 09-30-06, 06:31 AM   #12
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I tend to agree that the girl's seating situation is not ideal, but I don't think that you can really judge Lord Linney's actions without knowing the distance from home to school and the traffic conditions. If two blocks, I wouldn't report him to DHS for child endangerment. If 20 miles, I'd say he's pretty careless. One other factor to consider: he's been riding a Strida since at least 2003. I've never seen one except in pictures, so it's hard for me to say how safe/risky the rear rack is as a short-range seat for his 4 year old. Who among us has actualy ridden one? And finally, I have a 4 year old daughter whose game for any adventure. Ride on the rack? She'd want to ride on my shoulders so she could see better (not that I would). 4 year old girls are the most perfect combination of energy, joy, fearlessness and love.
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Old 09-30-06, 06:46 AM   #13
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Having had a daughter who was not afraid of anything, and having been cycling for over 30 years, I think he may have made a mis judgement in this case. From the news reports and the photos the area he is riding in and the fact he is depending on her to hold on concern me. But as parents we have to make our own decisions and keep in mind we are responsible for the lives of our children. I would not have done what he is doing I don't feel that it is safe. However I will give him credit in that the child is wearing a helmet.
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Old 09-30-06, 07:20 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonerLater
I tend to agree that the girl's seating situation is not ideal, but I don't think that you can really judge Lord Linney's actions without knowing the distance from home to school and the traffic conditions.
Exactly.

I doubt her Mother would agree to it unless she was confident he'd look after her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonerLater
If two blocks, I wouldn't report him to DHS for child endangerment. If 20 miles, I'd say he's pretty careless.
I don't *know* how far, but a good guess would be < 5 miles. After all, on level terrain, 12 mph is about the best cruising speed one gets :-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonerLater
Who among us has actualy ridden one?
I've ridden two :-)

I regularly ride mine through forest parks, & canal towpaths, where the surface leaves a *lot* to be desired (so I get through many puncture repair kits :-) ). The rack is rated at 5 Kilo's but will of course take a bit more on a nice road surface.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonerLater
And finally, I have a 4 year old daughter whose game for any adventure. Ride on the rack? She'd want to ride on my shoulders so she could see better (not that I would). 4 year old girls are the most perfect combination of energy, joy, fearlessness and love.
I wish I'd had the Strida when my daughter was 4! She'd have loved it. Very similar experience to you. She often went on my shoulders but I could never balance well enough to do it on a bike :-)
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Old 09-30-06, 01:06 PM   #15
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He was most likely taking it slow on the Strida, probably on sidewalks. The rake is very low to the ground, I doubt a fall would have hurt her. I doubt that a child seat would have done much if he was broad sided. If the girl let go and fell off that would be good, should would have learned an important lifes lesson. Holding a little girls hand in not safe, one false move and you can disjoint her shoulder. Lord Finley should be praised for not being and raising a wuss. If I was a little kid I would prefer 'the rack' to the humiliation of a baby's seat. I think Strida needs to sell a set of wheel pegs for that thing.
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Old 09-30-06, 01:39 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by geo8rge
...If I was a little kid I would prefer 'the rack' to the humiliation of a baby's seat. I think Strida needs to sell a set of wheel pegs for that thing.
It'd certainly make things easier for the kid, but I doubt they would, for legal reasons. It'd be encouraging folks to use the rack as a kid-seat, and they expressly recommend that this not be done.
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Old 09-30-06, 04:38 PM   #17
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Illegal to ride on UK pavements aka sidewalks so will have been on the road. In Chelsea probably.
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