Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Need advice chosing a folding bike.

    Hello,

    I am new to this forum. I've been lurking for a little while, trying to piece some information but it is a little overwhelming, so here is my question:

    I am in the market for a folding bike. My wife and I are a small carfree family living in the Seattle metro area and depending on our bicycles for our transportation. I ride an xtracycle and she rides a Trek 520. We are looking for a back-up bike that we could both use when our primary rides are not available or when doing a multi-modal commute.

    Due to our space constraints (we live on a sailboat), we cannot really afford to have a full-size backup bike for each of us. And since I am 6'3 and she is 5'4 we need a bike that could fit us both. This led me to consider folding bicycles. I like the versatility and freedom they provide.

    The requirements for the bike is that it could fit us both, provide gears to comfortably tackle the hilly terrain around us, and accommodate a pannier and fenders.

    I tested the Dahon Speed P8 over the week-end and was rather surprised by the substansial flex in both the seat tube (somewhat expected) and the steering/stem tube (that was a real surprise). The steering was also much more twitchy (sp?) than on a regular bike (I am assuming that you get used to that).

    I was wondering how would a Brompton compare to this? My requirements is leaning more toward a comfortable ride than the ease of folding. Could anyone help me narrow my choices? Would the flex in the seat tube be minimzed in another bike?

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,076
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome Iorek, you came to the right (virtual) place.

    Seattle is an excellent bike town and has a lot of bicycle shops catering to the folding bike user/owner. My Brompton was purchased at the Southern California branch of Folding Bikes West, which has it's main store in Seattle. If you can, I urge you to actually physically try out several makes of folders before you make your final decision. The difference can be striking between makes and even amoung the models
    themselves.

    For your own needs, I would not go over the 20 inch wheel size. The smaller wheeled bikes seem to fit the most bodies. I have 2 folding bikes at present, a 20 inch Dahon Boardwalk and the 16 inch Brompton. Both bikes address my needs in different, yet overlapping ways. My Dahon has all the accessories that came with it, including long fenders and a rear rack with I use when I commute any great distance. The Brompton is the "stripped down" no frills C type or Companion model to easily carry on and off public transit. For more information on how I selected, modified, and use each one, please click on my Geocities (text based) Web site below. To see the bikes and how I toured with them through Hollywood and surrounding areas, click on my Flickr (photo based) Web site below.

    Please feel free to contact any of us here on this forum if you need to. And do let us know what bike you selected!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Polaris43's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    165
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Iorek
    Hello,

    I am new to this forum. I've been lurking for a little while, trying to piece some information but it is a little overwhelming, so here is my question:

    I am in the market for a folding bike. My wife and I are a small carfree family living in the Seattle metro area and depending on our bicycles for our transportation. I ride an xtracycle and she rides a Trek 520. We are looking for a back-up bike that we could both use when our primary rides are not available or when doing a multi-modal commute.

    Due to our space constraints (we live on a sailboat), we cannot really afford to have a full-size backup bike for each of us. And since I am 6'3 and she is 5'4 we need a bike that could fit us both. This led me to consider folding bicycles. I like the versatility and freedom they provide.

    The requirements for the bike is that it could fit us both, provide gears to comfortably tackle the hilly terrain around us, and accommodate a pannier and fenders.

    I tested the Dahon Speed P8 over the week-end and was rather surprised by the substansial flex in both the seat tube (somewhat expected) and the steering/stem tube (that was a real surprise). The steering was also much more twitchy (sp?) than on a regular bike (I am assuming that you get used to that).

    I was wondering how would a Brompton compare to this? My requirements is leaning more toward a comfortable ride than the ease of folding. Could anyone help me narrow my choices? Would the flex in the seat tube be minimzed in another bike?

    Thanks,

    I live on a sail boat as well and have two Downtubes - a Mini and the VIIIH with front suspension. Both have the 8 speed Strumy Archer hub, which I highly recommend if you are going to be folding it and putting it away on the boat or in the trunk of your car. You won't have the mess of the chain as much and you don't have the risk of breaking your dérailleur or having to readjust it all the time due to inadvertant bumps in storage.

    Either the Mini or the VIIIH are both amazingly stiff for small folders and would likely work for both you and your wife as there are several over six foot guys riding both. Ultimately, you will have to decide based on what you are comfortable with. You should visit the two threads that provide detailed reviews of both the Mini and the VIIIH on this forum as well as the general Downtube thread. I think you will find the Downtubes quite economical to purchase and a blast to ride, in addition to being fully functional for your purpose and your domicile.

    Downtube also makes a Full Suspension and No-Suspension models if you don't mind the dérailleur. The FS is taller than all of the others as I recall.

    Here are the links to the in-depth reviews on the various Downtube bikes. Enjoy!

    Mini review Review of Downtube Mini with internal hub
    VIIIH review Review of my Downtube VIIIH with internal hub (long review)
    General Downtube Downtube folding bike

  4. #4
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hello,
    I'm also in Seattle and just got a Brompton as my first folder. I am wondering a little at the gearing and steering tube flex for hills, but the compactness is convenient. So far it has been fun. If you don't need quite as nice a fold, the downtube mini looks like an interesting choice as well.

  5. #5
    Car free since 1995 pm124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Birdy Yellow, Birdy Monocoque
    Posts
    1,004
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    On a boat, you'll want something with sealed bearings and high quality cables. Downtubes are stiff and cheap enough that you can have the bearings repacked in a year and still come in at less than a mid-range Dahon. In fact, you can replace the bottom bracket and headset and still come in at less money. They really handle well...even the handlebars are stiff...but it's important to take it to a local bike shop before riding for more than a minor tune up. If you can afford it, you might want a higher quality folder (Bike Friday, Birdy, high end Dahon) to avoid salt corrosion.

    They say that one should avoid standing and tugging on the bars on any folder. Best to sit and spin. The Downtube may sort of be an exception b/c the stem is steel.
    Last edited by pm124; 10-31-06 at 05:02 PM.

  6. #6
    Air
    Air is offline
    Destroyer of Wheels Air's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Creating some FA-Qs
    My Bikes
    Nishiki Sport, Downtube IXNS, 1950's MMB3 Russian Folding Bike, MTB
    Posts
    3,558
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I tried out Dahons, Montagues, and Downtubes. The Downtube was the only one that did not feel bendy to me and felt generally better made. Check out the links posted above.

    I'm a Clydes at 260, 6' 1" There are some modifications that people have done to the Downtubes to make them more accomodating to taller riders. The FS model seems to be better for taller riders but if you want to add fenders it's problematic. I have the NS - I like it a lot.

    My seatpost did bend however not too long after getting the bike. I'm awaiting a replacement and looking into other types of seatposts or solutions. I'll post there when I get the seatpst back

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    391
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 for using an XtraCycle!

    -How much are you looking to spend, ballpark?
    -Are you willing/able to do some extra tuning to your bike to make it more corrosion resistant?
    -Are the panniers a dealbreaker? Would a seat/saddlebag solution work?

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks all for your help. I will be taking a brompton for a spin tomorrow and will report back.

    Bookishboy, I am willing to spend around 1000 USD (still way less than a car ). I've been living on the boat for quite a while and I am quite aware of the toll on steel and other metals from the overall humidity in the air (and the salt), so I think I should be alright with the necessary repairs and tuning. As for the pannier, it is not necessarily a deal beaker. A nice handlebar bag or something like it could work. Now if it can swallow an Arkel bug whole, it would be even better.

  9. #9
    mini mini joy joy dcoli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    New York
    My Bikes
    Downtube Mini
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe you already know, but the Dahon sells a "Mariner" that's supposed to be extra resistant to corrosion.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    391
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some of the other folks in here know quite a bit more about folding bikes than I do, or have specific experience wrangling them onto a boat. With that caveat, and based on your requirements, I'll say what I would get for myself:

    1. A Brompton. Since it's a backup bike, I'd choose simplicity over features, but would get some key upgrades.
    -Starting with a Brompton C3;
    -add mudguards
    -add a front carrier block AND a front cloth folding basket
    -in addition to the front basket or instead of itadd a brooks saddle AND a dependable saddlebag (maybe Carradice)
    -add a telescopic seat tube (unless you and the wife are both under 6'0", then ignore this)
    -add a bag/box/suitcase to keep it in. Rather than spending lots of money on a brompton bag, I'd craft my own from scrap materials. Mid-term elections mean that there are going to be a lot of leftover election signs in a few weeks. Many of these are made from corrogated plastic (coroplast) and can be glued or sewn together into a dirt-cheap, sturdy box custom-shaped to your bike's smallest folded dimensions.

    Pros:
    Folds and unfolds quickly
    Gets amazingly small
    Solid reputation for company/quality.... bromptons get kept. People don't seem too eager to sell them off.

    Cons:
    Difficult to get the Brompton that *you* want without some work and *ahem* money thrown towards accessories, which are arguably overpriced and available only from Brompton dealers.
    Spare parts? Standardized parts? Haven't owned a Brompton myself, but have read some grumbles in here about Bromptons.

    2. A Swift folder, also customized in some particulars:
    -add MKS EZY quick-release platform pedals, or alternately folding pedals.
    -add quick-release fenders
    -add brooks saddle AND a saddlebag
    -possibly add a handlebar bag
    -If gears are needed, stick with internal hub (SA 8spd and Nexus8 have been getting a lot of compliments in here); otherwise, single-speed.
    -Add Big Apple tires. I personally use high-pressure slicks, but the Apples have been getting glowing praise from folks in here.... especially since they're going to probably sit on the bike deflated for long periods of time, I think they'd serve well for something like this.

    Pros:
    SOLID construction
    Mostly standard parts. Spare parts and upgrades can be had from nearly any bike shop.
    The bike can be taken in many directions, depending on how you want to upgrade it. Lightweight, drop bars, commuter, track bike, fixed-gear.... and you don't have to go back to the manufacturer for the upgrades or accessories.
    Not cheap either, but the bike seems to adapt more easily than a Brompton to a variety of riding styles and with the components that you choose, based on brand/quality/price/whatever.

    Cons:
    Well, it doesn't get *as* small as a Brompton
    To fold it down as far as it'll go, it's more a disassembly than a folding process. It takes a minute or two, and you wind up with a jumble of parts.... stem/handlebars dangle from the cables, the front wheel is just loose... you'd want a bag or box or bungie cables to hold it together. It's not as "neat" as a Brompton.


    In all honesty, I'd lean more towards the Swift. The Brompton is very good at getting very small, and pretty quick. The Swift on the other hand, will get somewhat small, very quickly.... and get smaller with a minute or two of jiggling (releasing the qr stem and taking of the qr front wheel. The Swift isn't as impressively small as the Brompton when it's folded, but it does get super thin, even if you don't fold it up all the way (just turn the handlebars sideways). The QR-pedals or folding pedals will get it even thinner. I'd recommend bagging/boxing it when it's stored between uses, but it can be leaned inside a closet without too much trouble. The bottom bracket is at a fixed angle from the rear hub; even when being folded, they move together, so you don't need a chain tensioner to keep the chain from falling off when it gets folded. The Swift design is spare, almost austere. It has about as few moving/pivoting parts that a folding bike can have while still compacting down.

    Bromptons are in many ways like Apple computers. They're stylish, a bit geeky, and they'll serve you well, but you have to be willing to do things "The Brompton Way", just like "The Apple Way". You'll pay a premium for the hardware, but find it very user-friendly. Upgrade paths will often be limited by the design.

    In either case, I'd shie away from a rear rack on either one. I specifically bought my DownTube because of its rear rack (as opposed to the full-suspension model), but rarely if ever use it. I tend to find three useage scenarios with rear racks on *most* folding bikes, none of which I find acceptable:
    1. A rear rack built onto the bike. Assuming that the bike has 20" or 16" wheels, I find it very hard to put *any* useful load on the rear rack, because anything that hangs over the edge of the rack tends to interfere with pedalling. The smaller wheels are so much closer to the ground that my heels scrape against whatever's loaded back there.
    2. A rack that attaches to the seatpost. Most of these are rated for rather conservative amounts of weight....again, enough to carry 3 books or a jacket, but not to go grocery shopping. These racks can also interfere with the fold of the bike.
    3. A permanent or QR rack which "stands up" from the rear hub. These tend to sit at closer to the height of a regular rack, but have to compromise either by being permanently mounted to the bike (interferes with fold) or having no place to put it when you fold/disassemble the bike. This may work if you take it off at home and stash it in your garage somewhere, but if you're riding the bike to work, and fold it so that you can carry it inside the building.....

    This is why I'm leaning more and more towards saddlebags. I've ordered my first Carradice saddlebag and plan to use this for my luggage from now on. One thing that many folding bikes have in common is a seatpost that sticks far, far up from the frame or tires of the bike. Even a large saddlebag can be fit in the crook behind the seat, without having to worry about tire-scraping. I used to have a hybrid bike to which I tacked on a rear rack and 2 Wald folding baskets (now stolen ; hence the switch to folding bikes). I'd love to do something similar to this on my folding bike, but this is one area I'm having to compromise in. I would predict that for someone used to riding an Xtracycle, the deficiencies of racks would be glaring. If you are willing to compromise, however, I think that you can get in a decent amount of groceries by using a large saddlebag and maybe also a handlebar bag.

    Good luck with narrowing down your selection, whatever you choose. We'd love to see pics and have you and the wife chime in with your opinions when you do eventually make a purchase.
    Last edited by bookishboy; 11-01-06 at 10:19 PM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    391
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Added: You asked about the twitchy steering. Yes, you do get used to this, after several days, or 10-20 miles of riding. It'll probably be a few days before your body "learns" the more responsive handling of the bike. If the twitchiness is a turnoff, then this is another point in favor of the Swift bike. The Brompton, with 16" wheels, will feel noticeably more twitchy than the Swift's 20" wheels.

  12. #12
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,076
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Greetings Bookish Boy,

    I do agree with your suggestion of a purchase of the C or Companion model of the Brompton. I went that route with the suggestion of the Brompton dealer, rather than waiting for the "better" M3 model. I thought that I needed some accessories like fenders, better brakes, even a rear rack up front. What I found after a month's ownership that I needed far less than I thought I did, and the things that I added to it were either non-Brompton parts and accessories (like the Nirve saddle, Kool Stop Brakes, and the traditional Sturmey-Archer shifter) or it was scrounged at the local cheap value stores or hand sewn (the bags and slipcovers) by me.

    While I do agree that some Brompton parts should be used, the things that Brompton (or any other bike maker) pushes at the consumer is overpriced and overrated-and sometimes are better served with something else.

  13. #13
    mini mini joy joy dcoli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    New York
    My Bikes
    Downtube Mini
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have the Downtube Mini, which last night made it's first trip to the grocery store, was wheeled around sans slipcover while folded (got some looks, but otherwise no problem), and had plastic bags hung from it's handlebars (in a very unblingful way.)

    I agree with the idea of using a saddle bag or handlebar bag - except I think a basket that attached to the front of the bike frame, rather than the handlebars, would be much more comfortable and safe. One possible answer would be some sort of rubber-ring contraption (like Topeak uses for it's lights) that could attach a brace to the front stem above and below the downtube, and a grocery-style folding bag/basket like Brompton's (http://www.bromptonbicycle.co.uk/hom...n_brochure.pdf) mounted on the brace, with a velcro strap to keep it close to the handlebar stem at it's top.

    However, I have a huge laptop, and still find the best ride is when I'm wearing it on my back in a backpack.

    - Colin

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    391
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey FF. I'd be interested in seeing a thread started by Brompton owners which examines the "expensive or exclusive parts/upgrades" rumor.

    This is one of the most persistant rumors/complaints about Bromptons, and I'm curious whether it's bias or basicallly true.

    Which Brompton parts that wear out and need replacing can be had at just any store, and which ones have to be purchased from Brompton (or a dealer?). Brakepads, tires, tubes, chain, drivetrain parts (tensioner), hubs, bottom bracket....

    Which consumable parts are available, but have to be special-ordered because of odd sizes?

    How easy/hard is it to customize a Brompton without buying the parts/accessories back from the Brompton network? How cheap/expensive is it? (extended seatpost, different saddle, different handlebars, brakes, rack, luggage.... etc etc)

    I do think that the OP will definitely need the fenders on whatever bike he gets. Since he's from Seattle, even an occasional-use or backup bike has to be prepared for the rain.

  15. #15
    Bicycling Gnome
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    55.0N 1.59W
    Posts
    1,877
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by folder fanatic
    Greetings Bookish Boy,

    I do agree with your suggestion of a purchase of the C or Companion model of the Brompton. I went that route with the suggestion of the Brompton dealer, rather than waiting for the "better" M3 model. I thought that I needed some accessories like fenders, better brakes, even a rear rack up front. What I found after a month's ownership that I needed far less than I thought I did, and the things that I added to it were either non-Brompton parts and accessories (like the Nirve saddle, Kool Stop Brakes, and the traditional Sturmey-Archer shifter) or it was scrounged at the local cheap value stores or hand sewn (the bags and slipcovers) by me.

    While I do agree that some Brompton parts should be used, the things that Brompton (or any other bike maker) pushes at the consumer is overpriced and overrated-and sometimes are better served with something else.
    Unless it's a Merc of course.

    I know that it's a Chinese rip off, but I've ridden mine a thousand miles over hill and dale, loaded and unloaded, with only four broken spokes and ne're a puncture. It cost £325, new on Ebay, came with mudguards, a rear rack, front luggage, carry bag, kevlar belted tyres, dynamo, lights, kick stand, and is supported by spares if you need them at ridiculously cheap prices.





  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well... After a fair bit of research, I've settled for the Dahon Helios P8. The stiffer aluminum ride is really what seduced me. The Brompton is probably the nicest ride of all the bikes I've tested but the local dealer rubbed me the wrong way and the gearing was a little off for my taste. The Birdy was nice but I have an aversion to suspension (bad bad memories of bad bad downhill spills). I couldn't find a downtube to test ride (and I will not buy a bike without at least taking it for a 4 miles ride -- which the Brompton dealer was not happy about).

    After about 50 miles (and one spill) on the Helios, I must say I like the ride more and more. It is nice and responsive, folds small enough to fit in my xtracycle freeloader (you should have seen the face of the LBS when I took the delivery) and so far feels quite sturdy. I am also enjoying the freedom of living lock free... Nice...

    Things I would love to change:
    • the saddle... Alas, alas, the stupid thing came with a i-beam saddle attachment doo-hickey. Now, how would I fit my brooks on this... Grrr....
    • The twist shifter... Don't like it but I am not sure what I could use instead
    • The rims... As soon as I have the chance, I will replace them with nice yellow Velocity Taipan... Now, I need to figure out what size hubs those are...


    Thanks for all your help... I will keep you posted on how the bike ages and behaves (it doesn't like rainy railroad tracks... Hence the spill... But then again, I don't really now a bike that would... Except maybe the Pugsley).

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    526
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Iorek
    Things I would love to change:
    [*]The twist shifter... Don't like it but I am not sure what I could use instead
    Hi Ioreck,
    You can always change your twist grip to a shimano pod shifter or a thumb shifter. Thumb shifters are still available, but will probably have to be ordered by your LBS or bought online.
    Juan

  18. #18
    jur
    jur is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    6,183
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Re the saddle, I would saw the seat post off and insert a standard one into the top of the sawn-off one, with a seat clamp arrangement.
    My folding bike photo essays www.dekter.net/

  19. #19
    Part-time epistemologist invisiblehand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    Jamis Nova, Bike Friday NWT, STRIDA, Austro Daimler Vent Noir, Haluzak Horizon, Salsa La Raza, Hollands Tourer, Bike Friday tikit
    Posts
    5,181
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Iorek
    Things I would love to change:
    • the saddle... Alas, alas, the stupid thing came with a i-beam saddle attachment doo-hickey. Now, how would I fit my brooks on this... Grrr....
    • The twist shifter... Don't like it but I am not sure what I could use instead
    • The rims... As soon as I have the chance, I will replace them with nice yellow Velocity Taipan... Now, I need to figure out what size hubs those are...
    The hubs are an odd size ... something like 72 mm. For a lot of people, I can see the Helios being a good buy.

  20. #20
    Car free since 1995 pm124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Birdy Yellow, Birdy Monocoque
    Posts
    1,004
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You'll have to build the wheel with a Dahon front hub. You can use a custom Pantour if that fits your fancy. If you aren't building the wheels yourself, I highly recommend J Gaerlan: http://www.gaerlan.com. Really nice guy who is a perfectionist and reasonable.

  21. #21
    mini mini joy joy dcoli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    New York
    My Bikes
    Downtube Mini
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Awesome, Iorek, congrats, and have fun! - Colin

  22. #22
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi EvilV and everyone. I just noticed the photo of the heavily loaded brompton. Currently I am researching the market fro a folder that can be used for commuting and for touring as well (with the ability to go a bit off road). I read the specifications of Brompton rear rack and it said that no more than 5kg should be carried on it.

    I am just wondering if this folder is good for touring. I'd thing bigger models like 20'' weeled with better frame would be more apropriate.

    How is it for you on touring?

  23. #23
    Car free since 1995 pm124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Birdy Yellow, Birdy Monocoque
    Posts
    1,004
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yiorgos, I sound like a broken record now. But: Birdy. It's the only small folder that explicitly encourages packed dirt trails in the owner's manual, and can take a full pannier load. No latch. Pricey, though, even used!

    Though I think a Downtube would suit these purposes just fine once trued and tuned. The latch is very strong, so it shouldn't present a problem. And it sounds like Yan takes them off road. We've taken ours on packed dirt trails. But be sure to get the spokes in shape first. Also, it will hold panniers just fine.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    391
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by yiorgos
    Hi EvilV and everyone. I just noticed the photo of the heavily loaded brompton. Currently I am researching the market fro a folder that can be used for commuting and for touring as well (with the ability to go a bit off road). I read the specifications of Brompton rear rack and it said that no more than 5kg should be carried on it.

    I am just wondering if this folder is good for touring. I'd thing bigger models like 20'' weeled with better frame would be more apropriate.

    How is it for you on touring?
    yiorgos, unless I'm mistaken EvilV's bike is a brompton knock-off. If you search this forum for "Merc" or "Mercbike" you'll probably find the relevant threads on it. It's *extremely* similar to a Brompton. I'm reciting the differences off the top of my head, so EvilV or someone else correct me if I'm wrong:

    -aluminum frame (Bromptons use steel)
    -Different brakes (owners assert as better than Brompton's stock brakes)
    -lower price (maybe 2/3 of a comparable Brompton, assuming you can find one)

    The owners of the Mercbikes have reported being quite pleased with them, particularly considering the price advantage they have over Bromptons.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    391
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Iorek
    Well... After a fair bit of research, I've settled for the Dahon Helios P8...
    Congratulations on getting a folder. Couple of questions for you:

    1. Pics? You must always post pics of a new famil.... ummm, bicycle, in here.
    2. You stated that it was for both you and your wife. How has she taken to it?
    3. Did you get one with a rack or not? Did you reach any conclusions about the luggage capabilities of a small-wheeled folder? I'm curious how an extracycle owner would adapt to a smaller folding bike.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •