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  1. #1
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    New bike tune up?

    Might be a dumb one, but what the heck. When everyone is talking about tuning up the bike after it is shipped / received.
    What should i be looking for?
    I recently purchased a Downtube IX NS, I havent ridden it yet, but would like to have an idea about what to be aware of.
    Thanks in advance.
    Tony

  2. #2
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Primarily, the tune up is to check that brakes, derailleurs, wheels, etc., are safe and functioning properly. When one buys through an LBS, the shop technicians will perform these checks. When buying over the Internet, this isn't available. If you're familiar with bike maintenance, you can do this yourself.

    For the Downtubes in particular, I would strongly recommend you have the LBS pull the bottom bracket and grease it properly. Trust me on this one. Otherwise, my 3 new Downtube purchases have all come out of the box in very good form, including an IXNS this week.

  3. #3
    Tornado of Teeth
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    Sesame, you're addicted! He's right too antne, unless you know what to be looking for, take it to the shop. Greasing the BB is extra, but only a couple bucks probably. Also, make sure they check the truing of the wheels.

    Did you see my response to your light and tire pump/gauge question?

  4. #4
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigMacFU
    Sesame, you're addicted!
    My friends have threatened intervention if I get any more folding bikes. Heh heh.

    I have one for fast recreational riding, one set up as a hybrid for riding around town and an FS for dirt. This doesn't count the Mini I got for my mother-in-law. I am still lusting after the internal hub models too.

    Oh well, if I wasn't spending the money on bikes, I'd be out spending it on golf or something....

  5. #5
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    hi all,

    Guys,
    I'm taking your advice and will be bringing my downtube to the LBS. i'd rather have it done right the frist time.
    BigMac,
    I did read your other response, TY. i already purchased a Topeak pump. great idea to have the Pressure gauge on the pump. i'm waiting for it to be shipped.
    Sesame,
    Thanks for your response, you guys on this forum are great.
    Tony

  6. #6
    Senior Member downtube's Avatar
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    I just created a quick checklist for you (and the bikeshop tech):

    1. Check to make sure all quick releases are tight, especially the one on the frame and stem.
    2. Check the stem to make sure it is attached properly. It is especially important to make sure the quill of the stem is tight; if it is loose it may cause the rider to lose control.
    3. Check the headset to make sure it is not too tight (or loose).
    4. Check brakes and make sure they are toed in to eliminate noise while braking
    5. Check shifting and inspect the rear derailleur hanger.
    6. Make sure the brake, derailleur, and stem bolts are tight, but not overtight.
    7. Tighten (do not overtighten) crank bolts and pedals.
    8. The brakes and shifter should be oriented in a comfortable manner for the rider.
    9. The bar ends should be oriented upward for riders that intend on cruising slowly, they should point down for riders that want to get into an aerodynamic tuck position.
    10. The stem angle should be close to +60 degrees (pointing up) for riders that want a comfortable cruiser style ride. The angle should be close to 0 degrees for aggressive faster riders. The stem can be flipped (on our 20” bikes) by removing the handlebar and orienting the stem to point inward towards the rider, and replacing the handlebar. Doing so will give the rider 60 extra degrees of adjustment…..altogether 120 of 180 degrees will be possible.
    11. The saddle should have and angle between 0 and -5 (pointing down 5 degrees) degrees. A lower angle is more comfortable to sit on. However when the angle is too small the rider will slide down while riding, causing discomfort. It is best to start with a saddle at 0 degrees (parallel to the ground) and go down until the rider feels comfortable sitting with a maximum downward angle of -5 degrees.
    12. The proper seatpost height is very important. Most novice cyclists ride with a seatpost that is too low. This will cause the rider to work very hard even at slow speeds, additionally it may cause knee pain. It is also unsafe for the saddle to be too high. A high saddle may allow the riders knee to lock out in a straight position while pedaling. This may cause serious knee damage, hence NEVER allow your knee to be completely straight when pedaling. Ideally a rider should have a slight knee bend while the foot is at its furthest point from his/her hip. A 35 degree angle at the bone (not the visual angle you see…. use a tool to measure) at the furthest point is optimal.
    13. Check the bearings at the hubs, and bottom bracket, lube if necessary.
    14. Inspect the frame, especially the swingarm on the full suspension bike. Make sure all bolts on the full suspension swingarm are tight.
    15. Fill the tires with 60psi of air.

  7. #7
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
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    The first bike tune-up is one of the most critical steps to a longer lasting, a great pleasure-to-ride high perforamce machine that will give it's rider(s) many more years of dependable use than if you skip this step. As a matter of fact, I will be taking my family's newest folding bike in very soon for it's own first tune-up. It will be free since I bought it at one of my favorite bike shops, but I still opt for this tune-up even if I had to pay.

  8. #8
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    Great

    Yan,

    Thanks for the list, you definetly stand behind yur product.
    Tony

    Quote Originally Posted by downtube
    I just created a quick checklist for you (and the bikeshop tech):

    1. Check to make sure all quick releases are tight, especially the one on the frame and stem.
    2. Check the stem to make sure it is attached properly. It is especially important to make sure the quill of the stem is tight; if it is loose it may cause the rider to lose control.
    3. Check the headset to make sure it is not too tight (or loose).
    4. Check brakes and make sure they are toed in to eliminate noise while braking
    5. Check shifting and inspect the rear derailleur hanger.
    6. Make sure the brake, derailleur, and stem bolts are tight, but not overtight.
    7. Tighten (do not overtighten) crank bolts and pedals.
    8. The brakes and shifter should be oriented in a comfortable manner for the rider.
    9. The bar ends should be oriented upward for riders that intend on cruising slowly, they should point down for riders that want to get into an aerodynamic tuck position.
    10. The stem angle should be close to +60 degrees (pointing up) for riders that want a comfortable cruiser style ride. The angle should be close to 0 degrees for aggressive faster riders. The stem can be flipped (on our 20” bikes) by removing the handlebar and orienting the stem to point inward towards the rider, and replacing the handlebar. Doing so will give the rider 60 extra degrees of adjustment…..altogether 120 of 180 degrees will be possible.
    11. The saddle should have and angle between 0 and -5 (pointing down 5 degrees) degrees. A lower angle is more comfortable to sit on. However when the angle is too small the rider will slide down while riding, causing discomfort. It is best to start with a saddle at 0 degrees (parallel to the ground) and go down until the rider feels comfortable sitting with a maximum downward angle of -5 degrees.
    12. The proper seatpost height is very important. Most novice cyclists ride with a seatpost that is too low. This will cause the rider to work very hard even at slow speeds, additionally it may cause knee pain. It is also unsafe for the saddle to be too high. A high saddle may allow the riders knee to lock out in a straight position while pedaling. This may cause serious knee damage, hence NEVER allow your knee to be completely straight when pedaling. Ideally a rider should have a slight knee bend while the foot is at its furthest point from his/her hip. A 35 degree angle at the bone (not the visual angle you see…. use a tool to measure) at the furthest point is optimal.
    13. Check the bearings at the hubs, and bottom bracket, lube if necessary.
    14. Inspect the frame, especially the swingarm on the full suspension bike. Make sure all bolts on the full suspension swingarm are tight.
    15. Fill the tires with 60psi of air.

  9. #9
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    Ty

    Fanatic,
    thanks for the info.

    If you dont mind me asking, (not sure if this a Faux Paux on my part).
    But what is the going rate were your located?

    Quote Originally Posted by folder fanatic
    The first bike tune-up is one of the most critical steps to a longer lasting, a great pleasure-to-ride high perforamce machine that will give it's rider(s) many more years of dependable use than if you skip this step. As a matter of fact, I will be taking my family's newest folding bike in very soon for it's own first tune-up. It will be free since I bought it at one of my favorite bike shops, but I still opt for this tune-up even if I had to pay.

  10. #10
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
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    I bought my Brompton from a distantly located bike shop some 90 miles from my residence since it is the only dealer within a couple of hour drive from home about a year ago. I took the bike to another shop somewhat nearby where I live that wanted a challenge of tuning it up and see how it works and performs. He charged me 40 dollars which included some minor customizations (adding another shifter plus Kool Stop brake pads), truing the wheels, general all bike check over, and labor.

    But do allow where you are located to help determine a fair price. I live in Southern California and everything is expensive, not just bikes.
    Last edited by folder fanatic; 01-06-07 at 06:29 PM.

  11. #11
    Tornado of Teeth
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    Antne, the topeak is a great pump! The morphs are sweet because they have the tube so the pump, which move a lot while pumping won't damage the valve.

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