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  1. #1
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    Help me pick a multimode folder

    Ok, I've been reading about folding bikes for a few months now and it's finally time for me to purchase one.

    I need a bike for my multimode commute. On a daily basis I plan on taking it with me on the bus before riding 1-5 miles at the other end to my job (rain or shine). On weekends I'd like to take it on the bus to go shopping at stores that are a little too far from the bus stop (1-2 miles). On occasion I'd also like to take it on railroad, light rail, and subway. I also currently fly very frequently, but the way the airlines are going I wouldn't be surprised if I found myself shopping for collapsible shoes in the near future (so I don't want to base my purchase on air compatibility).

    I don't plan on riding for fun or leisure and, as you can see, I don't really plan on riding much at all. Therefore, a major factor for me is speed and ease of folding. In addition, ability to roll while folded is a must and nonminiscule wheels to deal with potholes and city streets (sidewalks, curbs, etc) are a must. From my research the top contenders are (along with my impressions):

    Carry-Me (http://www.pacific-cycles.com, hard to find documents specs and manual):
    -Tiny 8" wheels (might even be too small).
    -Very compact and manageable fold (35"x12"x11")
    -Very light (7.5kg)
    -Carrier rack, but no fenders.
    -$500 price
    -Available at specialty shops.

    Mobiky (http://www.mobikyusa.com):
    -Only 12" wheels (better than 8", but still small).
    -Three gears (good for small hills).
    -Not so compact fold (32"x25"x12")
    -Heavy (13.4kg)
    -Fenders, but no carrier rack.
    -$600 price
    -Wide availability.

    Strida (http://www.strida.com):
    -Big 16" wheels.
    -Single speed.
    -Compact and manageable fold. (45"x20"x9")
    -Light (10kg)
    -Both carrier rack and fenders.
    -Unknown price (probably close to $500 after price hike).
    -No official availability.

    Based on the above features alone, the Strida and the Carryme are much more desirable than the Mobiky (ironic, considering that the Mobiky is the most widely sold). However, there are a number of additional considerations which I don't know how to interpret:

    -Strida advertises that their bikes are very low maintenance, the Carryme appears to be high maintenance (high pressure tyres require frequent inflation, metal parts require lubrication), and the Mobiky seems to be in between. I don't really want to have to worry about a lot of maintenance (it's one of the reasons I don't drive). Can one of you experts comment on how much of a true difference there is in required maintenance between these three bikes?

    -Strida advertises a 10 second fold, Mobiky advertises a 3 second fold, and Carryme advertises "folds in seconds". However, from videos I have seen the Strida appears to fold much more quickly and easily than the Mobiky (I haven't seen any videos for the Carryme). Can someone that has used these bikes comment on the actual folding time, particularly how they compare with each other?

    -I don't know anything about bikes and I don't know anything about quality parts. How do these three bikes compare with each other in terms of build quality and quality of parts?

    -I know that the best thing for me to do is to just try each bike and pick the one I like best. However, I can't find a dealer which has all three models in stock, much less a local one where I can test ride. How can I make the decision about which one to buy without being able to compare test rides? Moreover, how can I decide whether the Strida is even worth pursuing (since they are so hard to find) without having tried it?

    -Lastly, in your opinions, are there any other significant factors or eligible bikes that I'm forgetting?
    Last edited by makeinu; 01-07-07 at 10:02 PM.

  2. #2
    Member, Schmember DaFriMon's Avatar
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    Have you considered Brompton?

    Don't have one myself yet, but it will roll while folded, at least if you get the extra roller kit, it has a reputation for overall quality, will fold small and quickly, and the front luggage carrying system should be good for shopping. The down side is that even their cheapest model, without any add-ons, is around $650.

    In much of the USA, you'll have trouble finding local bike shops with any folders in stock, maybe a few low end Dahons. There are some Brompton dealers around, see this list, for example. http://tinyurl.com/y347u7 Some large cities do have bike shops with a good selection of folders. I take it you've checked the yellow pages and called around.
    You're right, I do have more bikes than I need.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaFriMon
    Have you considered Brompton?

    Don't have one myself yet, but it will roll while folded, at least if you get the extra roller kit, it has a reputation for overall quality, will fold small and quickly, and the front luggage carrying system should be good for shopping. The down side is that even their cheapest model, without any add-ons, is around $650.

    In much of the USA, you'll have trouble finding local bike shops with any folders in stock, maybe a few low end Dahons. There are some Brompton dealers around, see this list, for example. http://tinyurl.com/y347u7 Some large cities do have bike shops with a good selection of folders. I take it you've checked the yellow pages and called around.
    I haven't tried a Brompton in person, but from the videos I've seen they appear to be more cumbersome to fold and handle while folded than the three bikes cited above. It also doesn't look like it rolls very well on those roller wheels (which makes all the difference when trying to slip/bounce up and down the stairs of a bus) and the utility of the carrier rack is severely limited by the fact that you can't leave anything on it when the bike is folded.

    I mean, look at the difference in awkwardness (if you want to push with the handle bars):



    Then there is the price. It just doesn't make any sense to me to buy a Brompton when I could import a Strida 5.0 from Taiwan for the same price (even after the astronomical shipping charge). Even if the Brompton is a higher quality bike, it seems to be lacking in the areas which are most important to me. Am I a fool for not putting a priority on a quality build and good parts? Is a Strida 5.0 that much worse than a mid-end brompton for regular biking?

  4. #4
    Señor Mambo
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    In terms of compromise between ride quality and foldability/compactness, Strida seems like your best option (ever buy 8" or 12" tires and tubes?). A few complaints documented here about the Strida is the potential for the belt to skip when pedaling hard; the plastic bottom bracket which they say may feel flexy when pedaling; the sluggishness of the ride due to the plastic rim option; the initial ride squirrel-iness. However, they've also said Strida has rectified many of these problems/limitation mechanically, but there are still personal aesthetics, of course. It also still looks like a large package to me when folded, and I couldn't see myself sitting with it anywhere on a bus except for in the seats reserved for the elderly and disabled.

    In any case, when Strida was available in the U.S., they had a 30 day money back guarantee so that's one way to test all this stuff out. civagroup says they will be available in 2007; hopefully they'll offer the same guarantee. I think the price is also going up.

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    This is a good thread because the OP would fair better with the Strida when it comes to miltimode commuting with the bus. However, who knows when the Strida will be available again and shipping costs from China will bring the bike close to $1,000.00 USD or more! So the Strida is out of the question.

    The Brompton is the best choice in this case. I agree with your assertion that rolling the Brompton around on it's rollers will draw quite a few "STARES" but this happens to be the only way to move the bike around without having to physically carry it.

    I don't know about those other small wheel folders and their reliability is questionable. I happen to like the A Bike (www.abike-shop.com) and I'm really thinking of getting one for a very short 1.5 mile commute involving the bus. However, I'm not going to carry groceries or I'd have to choose a larger folder with 16 inch wheels. What worries me about these small wheel folders are parts that wear out. Where do you find them?? The second thing that worries me is night riding which would be very dangerous since a pot hole or large crack could send you straight to the ground. These small wheels are for day time riding only.

  6. #6
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    I agree with Dahon Steve about the Brompton being your best choice, makeinu. I own one (a simple C type lightly accessorized), plus another 16 inch Dahon Piccolo, and a Dahon Boardwalk which I share with my sister at times. I commute mainly on buses but occaisionly on lightrail and commuter trains. I tend to favor my Brompton the most for multi-modal commuting on all sorts of situations whether on the bus or just straight riding on various terrain. I do wheel the Piccolo and the Brompton about semi-folded and I could care less what others think of it just as long as the bike does not run over their toes! Any of my bikes could-and has been in the past-be pressed in for some very strange emergency situations if need be and that is the number one reason that I cannot stress more for keeping nothing smaller than 16 inch for any type of riding. You will never know until you are faced with a unforseen given situation how these little flexible wonders save your you-know-what.

    Check out my websites below before you buy and let us know if you need more assistance.

  7. #7
    Life in Mono
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    Well I have got a brompton and a strida, and for your criteria (multimodal) the strida will hit the sweet spot. However i'm talking Strida3 ..... some folk's experience of Stridas 1 & 2 are seriously in need of updates .... only about 6 years out of date :-)

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    Since I'm one of the few who have actually ridden a Carry-Me, makeinu asked, off-forum me to comment here.
    The Carry-Me is a fascinating piece of engineering, but I wouldn't want to ride one more than a mile at a time. And then only on decent surfaces.

    I've never ridden a Strida or Mobiky. But I keep my bikes a long time and I would never consider anything with as many pivot points to wear as the Mobiky.

    For MultiModal use as described by makeinu I'd get the Brompton and replace the little casters with roller blade wheels. Unless the Strida is a lot better bike than it looks.

  9. #9
    Part-time epistemologist invisiblehand's Avatar
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    From what you describe, sounds like a Brompton-like folder is the best bet. We have an older Brompton and a Merc. Both are good for short rides and commuting. Merc is the better value. If you want a "suped-up" version, you can contact Anita at Merc.

  10. #10
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    You could also check out the new Dahon catalog available as a link on their home page. You might see something of interest, particularly their new Curve, which might be their best model for multi-modal transportation.

  11. #11
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    Look guys, I know all about Bromptons, Dahons, etc. Those were the first bikes I considered, but I discounted them because they are either too difficult to fold, too difficult to manuever once folded, or too expensive.

    I know most of you are very serious about biking long distances, but I hope to never ride this bike more than 5 miles at a time.

    1. I want a bike that won't be a burden, if I take it with me, but end up lugging it around instead of riding it.
    2. I want a bike that can handle a 5 miles each way daily commute.

    Let me make reiterate what I've already tried to express: The Strida is obviously the best balance of these two criteria. The Brompton errs on the side of rideability instead of luggability, but I don't think it's worth the premium. The Mobiky and Carryme err on the side of luggability and their prices aren't exhorbitant. Therefore, I've narrowed down my selection to the following choices:
    -Seek out a Strida
    -Get a Carryme
    -Get a Mobiky

    Unless there are other bikes very similar to these bikes I'm pretty sure I want to limit my selection to these three (in my mind, Bromptons and Dahons are not very similar to these three). However, I'm having a tough time deciding which of these three options to choose due to uncertainty about maintanence, actual folding time, build quality, and test rides, as detailed in the OP.

    Although I appreciate everyone's input, on other bike brands. I created this thread primarily to gather information, comparisons, and opinions of the three bikes mentioned.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve
    I don't know about those other small wheel folders and their reliability is questionable. I happen to like the A Bike (www.abike-shop.com) and I'm really thinking of getting one for a very short 1.5 mile commute involving the bus. However, I'm not going to carry groceries or I'd have to choose a larger folder with 16 inch wheels. What worries me about these small wheel folders are parts that wear out. Where do you find them?? The second thing that worries me is night riding which would be very dangerous since a pot hole or large crack could send you straight to the ground. These small wheels are for day time riding only.
    Why go straight from a peewee like the A-bike to a full 16 incher? Why not consider a compromise like the Carryme or Mobiky (I know the answer for the Strida, "because you can't get them" )

    Quote Originally Posted by MnHPVA Guy
    The Carry-Me is a fascinating piece of engineering, but I wouldn't want to ride one more than a mile at a time. And then only on decent surfaces.
    That's what people are saying about the A-bike. It seems to me like the Carryme should perform quite a bit better than the A-bike. Do you disagree?

  13. #13
    Señor Mambo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simple Simon
    ..... some folk's experience of Stridas 1 & 2 are seriously in need of updates .... only about 6 years out of date :-)
    What specifically, then, needs updating?

  14. #14
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    The Mobiky folds to the size of a Brompton and is heavier. It doesn't roll particularly well when folded. It rides better than I expected but I'd pick a Brompton every time.
    The Strida is OK and I guess it is a reasonably close fit to the requirements (but what a big fold).
    Haven't ridden the other option.

    Maintenance is virtually irrelevant for any of these machines. As you keep saying, you aren't going to ride them very far.

    Have you actually ridden and folded any folder? You may change your mind on what you consider important in a folder. 5 miles is a fair way to ride a 'toy bike'. How are you going to get your shopping home on any of these bikes?

  15. #15
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    Its all about choosing THE best mode for YOUR circumstances. At one extreme some folk use their folders for riding long distances and hardly ever fold or transport them when folded, at the other extreme - (where I believe the questioner is is coming from), the journey may involve several fold/unfolds and much walking + carrying / wheeling the folded bike. Of the 2 folders I regularly use, the Brompton fits the 1st catagory, (but is slower to fold and tough to lug about eg bashed legs). The Strida fits the 2nd catagory (but is slower for long distances due to single speed). Strida is longer than others - it folds long and thin - but that is its point - you dont have to carry it -its long enough to fit between ground and hand !

    Strida3 is almost totally different from Strida 2 - with a much stiffer frame and better handling. The Video Thread posted by James shows the differences very clearly.... Thanks James !! There was also a bike there similar to the carry-me, but with smaller wheels.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Fear&Trembling's Avatar
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    I want a bike that won't be a burden, if I take it with me, but end up lugging it around instead of riding it.
    I am afraid all folding bikes are a burden when you are not riding them – but it is true that some are greater encumbrances than others.

    Due to the fact that you cannot carry out a comparative test, I would have thought the opinions of other riders with experience and detailed knowledge of the pros and cons of folding bikes in various multi-modal contexts is something to consider, even when it does not dovetail with your own selection criteria. Moreover, as it was you who canvassed people for their views on different models, I am surprised you dismiss them so easily:

    Lastly, in your opinions, are there any other significant factors or eligible bikes that I'm forgetting?

    I will ignore all of your sweeping generalisations but one (regarding the Brompton), as they are OT:

    I discounted them because they are either too difficult to fold, [and] too difficult to manuever once folded
    For your information, my nine year old neighbour can fold (quickly, I might add) and wheel a Brompton….

    I will also not question the modus operandi that you have employed with regard to the short-list, even though I think it is flawed. That said, a stick folder seems reasonable enough given your requirements. To take full advantage of a stick folder, I take it that you have already considered how often you will need to a) fold the bike, b) wheel the bike, c) where you will be wheeling the bike, and d) what distances (10metres, 100metres etc) you will be covering when having to transport the bike. If you are going to be covering longer distances on foot regularly, wheeling is the major plus of the Strida, and to a lesser extent the Mobiky, but if you do not have to wheel the bike any great distances, stick folders are less attractive propositions.

    How tall are you? This is something to consider with all of the stick folders you have listed. I know from experience that the Strida is best suited for people under six-foot. I am 6ft 2” and was not comfortable with the riding position.

    Although a 5 mile max commute may not seem far, if you opt for a single geared folder such as the Carry Me or Strida (with a lowish ratio) it is probably better to think how long this journey will take you in minutes. On a Carry Me it may take 30 mins or longer, on a Strida it will probably take less time. This is a reasonable amount of saddle time, particularly if your roads are not too great. I am also guessing that you are not going to be tackling any steepish gradients? I would contend that none of the three bikes you have shortlisted will be suitable for out of the saddle riding. What’s more, super-small wheels and poorly maintained asphalt are not a good mix.

    IMO, the Strida should offer the best ride due to its larger diameter wheels. I know this consideration is not at the top of your list of preferences, but the comfort of the ride is important as you will probably spend more time cycling than wheeling.

    Why is folding time an issue – I am interested? Most bikes can be done anywhere between 15 and 30 secs (some faster) but for most people this is far less of a factor than the ride, size of the fold, portability etc.

    In terms of maintenance, the Strida should be the best bet, but if anything goes wrong will your lbs be able to deal with it? I doubt anyone will be able to give you much detail on the durability of the Mobiky and Carry Me as both bikes are relatively new on the folding bike scene. Also the issue of proprietary parts should be factored into the equation.
    Last edited by Fear&Trembling; 01-08-07 at 06:53 AM.

  17. #17
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    If you are riding "rain or shine", keep in mind that none of your choices have effective mudguards.

  18. #18
    To fold or not to fold?
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    I am surprised that you think the Brompton is a difficult fold or carry. As with any bike buy probably best to try out your varying options before buying.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fear&Trembling
    I am afraid all folding bikes are a burden when you are not riding them – but it is true that some are greater encumbrances than others.

    Due to the fact that you cannot carry out a comparative test, I would have thought the opinions of other riders with experience and detailed knowledge of the pros and cons of folding bikes in various multi-modal contexts is something to consider, even when it does not dovetail with your own selection criteria. Moreover, as it was you who canvassed people for their views on different models, I am surprised you dismiss them so easily:
    I don't mean to be dismissive, it just appears to me that most people around here are looking for something different then what I am looking for.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fear&Trembling
    For your information, my nine year old neighbour can fold (quickly, I might add) and wheel a Brompton….
    I'm sure your nine year old neighbor can quickly take my current nonfolder out of my basement too, but I never do because I don't think it's worth the hassle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fear&Trembling
    I will also not question the modus operandi that you have employed with regard to the short-list, even though I think it is flawed.
    Please don't spare me the criticism. I'd like to know exactly how my modus operandi is flawed. I'd rather have hurt feelings now and a better bicycle later.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fear&Trembling
    IMO, the Strida should offer the best ride due to its larger diameter wheels. I know this consideration is not at the top of your list of preferences, but the comfort of the ride is important as you will probably spend more time cycling than wheeling.
    Ok, point taken.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fear&Trembling
    Why is folding time an issue – I am interested? Most bikes can be done anywhere between 15 and 30 secs (some faster) but for most people this is far less of a factor than the ride, size of the fold, portability etc.
    I want it to be quick enough so that I can arrive at the bus stop just as the bus is arriving, fold it, and get on. 30 seconds is long enough for the bus to come and go, leaving me in the dust.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fear&Trembling
    In terms of maintenance, the Strida should be the best bet, but if anything goes wrong will your lbs be able to deal with it? I doubt anyone will be able to give you much detail on the durability of the Mobiky and Carry Me as both bikes are relatively new on the folding bike scene. Also the issue of proprietary parts should be factored into the equation.
    Thanks.

  20. #20
    Part-time epistemologist invisiblehand's Avatar
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    Not too sure whether you want this information ...

    My wife is 5'4" and 110 lbs dripping wet. She regularly commutes with the Merc--she prefers it over the old Brompton. I put on roller blade wheels on the back and she wheels it upstairs to our apartment as well as well as her office (with the seatpost extended). She has no complaints about transporting the bike this way. The bike is ~26 pounds in its present configuration (with bells and whistles). She would agree with you in that she rather not carry the bike very far ... although with the bag and shoulder strap, she says that it is more than manageable. She does not ride the bus; but she does ride the Metro with the bike. However, to get into the DC Metro, one does not have to carry the bike. She is a klutz, so folding the bike took her a minute the first week. However, she now folds and unfolds the bike under 15 seconds. Note that the front bag with the Brompton/Merc can remain on the bike and be wheeled; although it does make the fold bigger.

    Anyway, I am no champion of the Merc/Brompton. But as a multimodal commuter, it has served us well.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Fear&Trembling's Avatar
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    Please don't spare me the criticism. I'd like to know exactly how my modus operandi is flawed. I'd rather have hurt feelings now and a better bicycle later.
    You posted:

    Therefore, a major factor for me is speed and ease of folding. In addition, ability to roll while folded is a must and nonminiscule wheels to deal with potholes and city streets (sidewalks, curbs, etc) are a must. From my research the top contenders are (along with my impressions):
    From your criteria I cannot see why you picked the Carry Me (8" wheels) and Mobiky (12" wheels) as their ability to negotiate potholes and curbs will be very poor. Both of these bikes will not handle the conditions you describe at all well. Once you get below 16" (305s) the ride is always going to be compromised. The Strida is the only option I can understand. Personally, I would have plumped for the Strida, Brompton and Airframe (although getting hold of the latter bike in the US would be difficult).

    My point about my young neighbour is that the Brompton/Merc is straigthforward to fold (far less troublesome than the Birdy). It can be wheeled reasonably easy, lifted (depending on your strength of course), and you can carry it on your shoulder with the rear end tucked under (this was my preferred method when running for a train).

    I want it to be quick enough so that I can arrive at the bus stop just as the bus is arriving, fold it, and get on. 30 seconds is long enough for the bus to come and go, leaving me in the dust.
    I wish my timing could be so well coordinated with our trains and buses. Generally speaking and with practice, you should be able to fold nearly all folders in less than 30 secs. If you are operating to tighter tolerances than this, perhaps you should work on your time-management

  22. #22
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    At the risk of a wide-spread pillorying... Why not get a scooter?

    A scooter will ride at about 6-8mph, so it's over twice as fast as walking. It's cheap, light, easy to fold, easy to store, much easier to take on a train than any folding bike, requires minimal maintenance, and should be fine for your expected distances.

    It seems like a more appropriate solution than a folding bike for your needs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe
    At the risk of a wide-spread pillorying... Why not get a scooter?

    A scooter will ride at about 6-8mph, so it's over twice as fast as walking. It's cheap, light, easy to fold, easy to store, much easier to take on a train than any folding bike, requires minimal maintenance, and should be fine for your expected distances.

    It seems like a more appropriate solution than a folding bike for your needs.
    Although I have a few folding bikes, I also have a Xootr scooter and would agree that it would be ideal for most short hops on and off buses... I use mine regularly for 3 to 4 mile flat area runs and it is a practical, fun solution when I'm not going far... there is a Yahoo group devoted to Xootr... lots of info from people who commute with them..

    Bruce

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fear&Trembling
    From your criteria I cannot see why you picked the Carry Me (8" wheels) and Mobiky (12" wheels) as their ability to negotiate potholes and curbs will be very poor. Both of these bikes will not handle the conditions you describe at all well. Once you get below 16" (305s) the ride is always going to be compromised. The Strida is the only option I can understand. Personally, I would have plumped for the Strida, Brompton and Airframe (although getting hold of the latter bike in the US would be difficult).
    I'm perfectly willing to compromise the ride. That's the whole idea, I want a compromise between rideability and luggability.

    I mentioned that bit about potholes and curbs (by curbs I meant curbs with ramps, not jumping over full sized curbs) for the very reason that I'm not sure about the 8" and 12" wheel sizes. I'm willing to deal with poor ability to negotiate them as long as it isn't dangerous or impossible (as it seems it would be with the 6 inchers on the A-bike). Would you say 8" wheels would be dangerous on city streets? If so, then perhaps the Strida is truely my only option. Although, I recently spoke with a bike dealer who told me that the Strida is built like crap and wears out very quickly and easily. From reading people's experiences online, it seems like that might be true and I'm actually surprised no one has mentioned it in this thread. Do you think the Strida isn't very durable?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fear&Trembling
    I wish my timing could be so well coordinated with our trains and buses. Generally speaking and with practice, you should be able to fold nearly all folders in less than 30 secs. If you are operating to tighter tolerances than this, perhaps you should work on your time-management
    The timing isn't well coordinated at all, which is why I need to be ready whenever the bus actually comes, not 30 seconds after. The traffic is bad enough in this part of the city that you can see the bus coming down the block and have a solid 60 seconds before it gets to the nearest stop. If I miss it, it's easy enough to run ahead to the next stop and catch it (due to congestion). I'm afraid a 30 second fold would make me lose this ability. Especially when compared to bikes which not only fold in under 10 seconds, but can also be folded while walking/running to the next stop, such as the Strida or Mobiky (which can be folded while rolling) or the Carryme (which is probably light enough to fold while holding in the air).

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe
    At the risk of a wide-spread pillorying... Why not get a scooter?

    A scooter will ride at about 6-8mph, so it's over twice as fast as walking. It's cheap, light, easy to fold, easy to store, much easier to take on a train than any folding bike, requires minimal maintenance, and should be fine for your expected distances.

    It seems like a more appropriate solution than a folding bike for your needs.
    Quote Originally Posted by BruceMetras
    Although I have a few folding bikes, I also have a Xootr scooter and would agree that it would be ideal for most short hops on and off buses... I use mine regularly for 3 to 4 mile flat area runs and it is a practical, fun solution when I'm not going far... there is a Yahoo group devoted to Xootr... lots of info from people who commute with them..

    Bruce
    See, here is something I don't understand. How could a scooter with ~8" wheels and no gearing at all be recommended for 3-4 mile trips and 6-8 mph speeds, but a bike like the Carryme be unsuitable for the same kinds of trips?

    Wouldn't you think that the gearing and the fact that you can sit on the bike would at least double the distance and speed?
    Last edited by makeinu; 01-08-07 at 11:29 AM.

  25. #25
    Señor Mambo
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    No scooter will beat an adult designed bike in either distance or speed (though both distance and speed are relative, and assuming the rider/operator has good fitness). They're just convenient through foot traffic and other congested areas, fold quickly, and are light. Xootr is the best in terms of scooters, said with bias of course.
    Last edited by spambait11; 01-08-07 at 12:09 PM.

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