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  1. #1
    Brompton M3L, Strida 5.0
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    If you have Brompton w/ a rear rack...

    how easy is it to push the folded bike on a flat man-made surface (like an office building floor), using the seatpost extended upwards?

    I have an M3L that I have to carry some distance to get to my desk. It's doable but annoying. I can't unfold the bike or I'll get flagged by security people for having a bike inside the building (they don't care about folded bikes).

    So I've been tempted to add the rear rack, which I can purchase separately from SJS Cyles. But it's a pretty penny (about $200 by the time you add the ez wheels) so I'd like to hear from people who've already got the rack on their Bromptons.

    I can actually roll my Brompton by using the front bars instead of the seatpost, but that adds considerably to the amount of space taken up - a problem on the elevators. The seatpost is more vertical, and also less wide. But there's too much friction with the standard rollers to push by the seatpost. That little rubber wheel on the rear fender is more for protecting the fender, methinks, than for actual rolling.

  2. #2
    Brompton M3L, Strida 5.0
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    I want to push it like this

    in this state. sorry for poopy celly pic. (my bike is orange, not pink!)
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
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    dude,

    drop the seat,

    raise the bars,

    nd pull it by the bars

  4. #4
    Brompton M3L, Strida 5.0
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    Yes, I know I can do that (see last para). But that way the partly-unfolded bike takes up too much space - lengthwise and widthwise. With the seat up as opposed to the bars, the only addition to space usage is vertical, which is fine since I'm above the bike.

  5. #5
    Part-time epistemologist invisiblehand's Avatar
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    Did you put skate wheels on the rear?

  6. #6
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by makingmark View Post
    how easy is it to push the folded bike on a flat man-made surface (like an office building floor), using the seatpost extended upwards?

    I have an M3L that I have to carry some distance to get to my desk. It's doable but annoying. I can't unfold the bike or I'll get flagged by security people for having a bike inside the building (they don't care about folded bikes).

    So I've been tempted to add the rear rack, which I can purchase separately from SJS Cyles. But it's a pretty penny (about $200 by the time you add the ez wheels) so I'd like to hear from people who've already got the rack on their Bromptons.

    I can actually roll my Brompton by using the front bars instead of the seatpost, but that adds considerably to the amount of space taken up - a problem on the elevators. The seatpost is more vertical, and also less wide. But there's too much friction with the standard rollers to push by the seatpost. That little rubber wheel on the rear fender is more for protecting the fender, methinks, than for actual rolling.
    I have 3 different makes folding bikes. I solved this problem by using a luggage cart (the same luggage carts you see at airports and train stations wheeling around luggage over a wide distance). All I do is place the bike in a bag (usually soft ones) to help prevent scratches and dings as well as escape prying eyes, tie it with a large bungee cord to the cart, and wheel it in any building that even has noisy security. Since they cannot see the actual bike, no more hassles. You might be able to store the cart at work even at the security desk so you need not take it with you each day. The price is far less than adding a rear rack to any bike. For more information on how this cart looks like see:

    http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html/sr=1-10/qid=1188509455/ref=sr_1_10/602-5695654-3946221?ie=UTF8&asin=B000I9CXXK

    Please let me know if this is helpful in your particular situation as it was in my own.
    Last edited by folder fanatic; 08-30-07 at 03:29 PM.

  7. #7
    jur
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    Quote Originally Posted by folder fanatic View Post
    I have 3 different makes folding bikes. I solved this problem by using a luggage cart (the same luggage carts you see at airports and train stations wheeling around luggage over a wide distance). All I do is place the bike in a bag (usually soft ones) to help prevent scratches and dings as well as escape prying eyes, tie it with a large bungee cord to the cart, and wheel it in any building that even has noisy security. Since they cannot see the actual bike, no more hassles. You might be able to store the cart at work even at the security desk so you need not take it with you each day. The price is far less than adding a rear rack to any bike. For more information on how this cart looks like see:

    http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html/sr=1-10/qid=1188509455/ref=sr_1_10/602-5695654-3946221?ie=UTF8&asin=B000I9CXXK

    Please let me know if this is helpful in your particular situation as it was in my own.
    This is a clever idea; it also shows just how dumb security can be - what if that soft bag contained a major bomb? Will they still be OK with it as long as they can't see it?
    My folding bike photo essays www.dekter.net/

  8. #8
    Brompton M3L, Strida 5.0
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    I did put skate wheels on rear. Not enough to overcome the high-resistance tiny wheel on the rear fender.

    Folder Fanatic - nice idea, but I don't want to hassle with the extra piece of equipment.

    So - I'm still interested in hearing from feedback from people *who have the rear rack* on how it rollable it makes the bike in the position I've specified.

  9. #9
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by makingmark View Post
    So - I'm still interested in hearing from feedback from people *who have the rear rack* on how it rollable it makes the bike in the position I've specified.
    What you're describing works very well, especially if you have upgraded to roller blade wheels. If you want, I can take a picture and show you how it looks.
    Last edited by SesameCrunch; 08-30-07 at 11:02 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jur View Post
    This is a clever idea; it also shows just how dumb security can be - what if that soft bag contained a major bomb? Will they still be OK with it as long as they can't see it?
    It's a very good idea.

    I was thinking you could leave the luggage cart locked someplace outside with a U-Lock if you can't find a someone to store it for the OP. A sound idea overall.

  11. #11
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Makingmark:

    Here. Does this answer your question?





    Here it is tilted and rolling on the skate wheels:

  12. #12
    Edd
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    SesameCrunch thanks for the photos, in the last photo the rubber block is close to the ground although higher than with the original wheels, I have a damaged plastic end to the block from it catching with part of it snapping off. I wondered whether wheels at the rear of the carrier whould allow the bike to be tipped in the other direction, or rolling it flat on all four wheels, and thus preventing damage to the rubber component?

    Edd

  13. #13
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edd View Post
    SesameCrunch thanks for the photos, in the last photo the rubber block is close to the ground although higher than with the original wheels, I have a damaged plastic end to the block from it catching with part of it snapping off. I wondered whether wheels at the rear of the carrier whould allow the bike to be tipped in the other direction, or rolling it flat on all four wheels, and thus preventing damage to the rubber component?

    Edd
    In that photo, the bike is on a carpet, thus exaggerating things. On a hard floor, I can wheel it around without the rubber block hitting the ground, unless I tip it over too much.

  14. #14
    Brompton M3L, Strida 5.0
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    Sesame,
    Yes that's what I mean.
    Without any tipping, does the bike roll well on a hard flat surface. That's what I want to know.
    Tipping is problematic because of a) the clearance with the suspension block and b) if you have to push and tip, that's too much concentration. It needs to be easier than carrying it.

    It sounds like you're saying yes, it rolls well just pushing it by the seat, as long as it's not on carpet.

  15. #15
    Bicycling Gnome
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    Quote Originally Posted by SesameCrunch View Post
    Here it is tilted and rolling on the skate wheels:
    That bike looks brand, spanking new!

    For a second hand aquisition, I think you have been very fortunate.
    “Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live." - Mark Twain

  16. #16
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by makingmark View Post
    Sesame,
    Yes that's what I mean.
    Without any tipping, does the bike roll well on a hard flat surface. That's what I want to know.
    Tipping is problematic because of a) the clearance with the suspension block and b) if you have to push and tip, that's too much concentration. It needs to be easier than carrying it.

    It sounds like you're saying yes, it rolls well just pushing it by the seat, as long as it's not on carpet.
    Yes, it rolls without interference on hard surfaces WITH the upgraded skate wheels. But, it's easy for me to roll it in a slightly tipped position also.

  17. #17
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvilV View Post
    That bike looks brand, spanking new!

    For a second hand aquisition, I think you have been very fortunate.


    I bought it from another folder lover, and it shows!

  18. #18
    Bicycling Gnome
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    Quote Originally Posted by SesameCrunch View Post


    I bought it from another folder lover, and it shows!
    Mine has been heavily abused in comparison. However, as it is a bicycle - intended for hard useage, I suppose that's to be expected. I hammered it around on a twelve mile ride with my 23 year old (middle son) today. he was on his mountain bike and we charged around some low traffic / traffic free routes. Boy did I work up a sweat. I must check the spokes. I crashed over some rather lumpy 'traffic calming'(*1) obstacles at twenty miles an hour - probably over twenty of them. Believe it or not, the lunatic municipal authorities around here, place three inch high obstacles right acorss the roads to slow the traffic in certain areas. These might be fine on slow moving vehicular tarffic, or fully suspended mountain biles, but walloping over them on my 16 inch wheeled merc is only ok if I manage to raise my arse from the saddle and run over them at about 16 mph standing on the pedals so that I save the poor wee thing some trouble. I didn't always manage to take the bumps like that.





    *1

    So called 'traffic calming' is a bizarre concept suggesting in an example of the disordered thought processes of overpaid and under-employed municipal types that dropping a lump of concrete and tar macadam onto the highway, pretty much after the manner of a tank trap, will imporve everyones experience of using the roads because we'll all somehow be safer. Tell that to me when my bike snaps in half ya stupid municipal wallies!!!!
    Last edited by EvilV; 08-31-07 at 04:45 PM.
    “Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live." - Mark Twain

  19. #19
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve View Post
    It's a very good idea.

    I was thinking you could leave the luggage cart locked someplace outside with a U-Lock if you can't find a someone to store it for the OP. A sound idea overall.
    Thank you very much, Dahon Steve. I actually have a cheap luggage cart that I lock (with just a cable lock) outside one of the train stations when I take one of the bikes for a long ride and do not care to tie it to the rear rack if that bike has one. My more nicer luggage cart is reserved for office buildings and such. I am thinking of buying a U-Lock for it on the next trip for even the cheapie one.

  20. #20
    Brompton M3L, Strida 5.0
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    Thanks all for the posts. I especially like the idea of locking a luggage cart outside - smart!!

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