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  1. #1
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    Strida USA finally arrived

    It appears Strida finally found a distributor in the U.S.A. The price of the Strida is priced $200.00 more than last year at this time when they were selling for $295.00. Regardless, I'm glad the Strida is finally available and hope to see used ones on Ebay within a year.

    What bothers me is that Strida spent close to a year in finding a partner who was going to market the product. I thought they were serious in finding a company like Trek or Giant or Pacific bikes who have the resources with local bike shop support to sell the product. Instead, they choose a "design collective" with no experience in the bicycle industry to take over the marketing and distribution! Incredible.

    Harry Allen who works in Areaware appears like a knowledgeable person with a good working portfolio but where is his experience in bicycles? I wonder if any of these members use the product on a daily basis or even ridden the bike! It's just incredible that Strida would sacrifice tens of thousands in lost income and not have a solid partner a year later.

    Areaware is located in New York City but not one bike shop is selling them. There's no marketing of the product of any kind. I guess we all better pony up and buy a Strida for the future is still uncertain.

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    I was gonna say that

    Well, I was really going to say "ha ha, beat you to it..."

    http://bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=350767

    posted 6 days ago ... but you certainly gave more commentary than me!

    Areaware is listing the bike the same $$$ as Strida.ca, but charges shipping on top of that. Unless Strida.ca is willing to stop shipping to USA, I don't see Areaware moving many bikes.

    Yet I do expect this to drive the eBay/used market a bit. Lowest price I've a Strida 5 go for (used) was $627 with shipping: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=130159078601

    When I can get one delivered for under $550 I'll probably upgrade. Doesn't even have to be red.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee_rimar View Post
    Well, I was really going to say "ha ha, beat you to it..."

    http://bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=350767

    posted 6 days ago ... but you certainly gave more commentary than me!

    Areaware is listing the bike the same $$$ as Strida.ca, but charges shipping on top of that. Unless Strida.ca is willing to stop shipping to USA, I don't see Areaware moving many bikes.

    Yet I do expect this to drive the eBay/used market a bit. Lowest price I've a Strida 5 go for (used) was $627 with shipping: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=130159078601

    When I can get one delivered for under $550 I'll probably upgrade. Doesn't even have to be red.
    I was looking for someone who posted on this but couldn't find one. You beat me.!

    I don't know why this group was given the exclusive rights to sell the Strida in the U.S.? None working at Areaware have experience in the bicycle industry.

    This product didn't sell well before and now that the price is higher, I expect them to sell less!
    Last edited by Dahon.Steve; 10-13-07 at 03:53 AM.

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    Areaware

    It may be too soon to judge since they just announced a couple weeks ago.

    But I can't see them making too many direct sales unless they dump some serious effort into promotions. Internet search-engines and blogging saturation campaigns might do it.

    Alternately, they could market to bike shops. I don't know what kind of margins they're working on, but they might be able to move a few hundred bikes a year that way.

    NOT being exclusively a bike dealer has its plus side, too. They're a design collective with a broad portfolio - so they won't go under if Strida sales aren't brilliant.

  5. #5
    Senior Member randya's Avatar
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    so what's a strida 5 going for in the US? anyone have a link to a real sales site, not some ebay BS?

  6. #6
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    www.strida.com or www.strida.us
    prices seem ok .. similar to uk (if not less) ... prices in US always seem enviously low to us Brits .. as the pound is high. Some bike companies charge high premuims in uk compared to usa, there has been much discussion on dahon forum.

    As long as these new guys give you same (excellent) customer service as the UK guys there will be nothing to worry about - my bike is well out of warrantee but they still look after me .. low prices on spares (tyres and even a new rear wheel) and no charges for small items like screws with new locktite.

  7. #7
    Because I thought I could ks1g's Avatar
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    Looks like Velo-Orange in Annapolis MD is going to be carrying Strida: http://www.velo-orange.com/strida.html

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    hi all, I am the president of Areaware. It is true that we are new to the bike biz but we are an office full of avid 2 wheelers (I ride a Strida, a Pashley-Moulton TSR and a TidalForce X Montague folder for long distances) and we have a lot of access to the design and media worlds where we think the Strida can really thrive. We just finished InterBike in Las Vegas and have setup about 2 dozen dealers nation wide. Design Within Reach and the Museum of Modern Art will be carrying the Strida which will give it much needed Blue Chip exposure in the US. Please feel free to email any thoughts or suggestions you have to how we can do a steller job in getting the Strida rolling. I believe that the Strida is a unique position to take the ride and carry and display commuting world by storm. It is the easiest folding bike to carry with its belt drive and light weight, it gets tons of attention on the street because it doesn't look like a Brompton or one of it's many legitimate and illegitimate siblings and it looks great hanging on your wall! The only thing stopping it from dominating unfortunately is its steep price. Margins are razor thin (the bike is made in Taiwan from many custom parts that are not massed produced) and as Lee pointed out we are not looking to make a mint on Strida but rather to add an important eco aware product to our portfoliio.

    cheers

    Noel Wiggins
    noel@areaware.com

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    "Please feel free to email any thoughts or suggestions you have to how we can do a steller job in getting the Strida rolling."

    Give away 300 of them on Oprah's favorite things.
    2000 Montague CX, I do not recommend it, but still ride it.
    Strida 3, I recommend it for rides < 10mi wo steep hills.
    2006 Rowbike 720 Sport, I recommend it as an exercise bike.
    1996 Birdy, Recommend.
    Wieleder CARiBIKE (folding), decent frame.

  10. #10
    Seņor Mambo
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    Quote Originally Posted by stridaguy View Post
    Please feel free to email any thoughts or suggestions you have to how we can do a steller job in getting the Strida rolling...
    Support this site by setting up a vendor's account.

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    Who's going to pay those prices? There are much better deals out there on folding bikes. For example, the Pacific's Carryme is a similar bike of similar and/or better quality at a much better price point.

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    Portland, Oregon

    Quote Originally Posted by stridaguy View Post
    ...We ... have set up about 2 dozen dealers nation wide. ... Please feel free to email any thoughts or suggestions you have to how we can do a steller job in getting the Strida rolling...
    Some cities are more bike-friendly, bike-aware than others. If you can get Strida on display shops in those cities, you'll have better prospects. Not everybody shops online, and even those who do often want to test ride before buying.

    Portland, Oregon would be a good place to get into a shop. Any visibility here would lead to sales. I commute on a Strida 3, and judging from the comments I get, I figure you'd sell a lot of them here. At least two bike shops that would be likely candidates:

    - Coventry Cycleworks, specialized in recumbents but also carries Dahon folders and some high-quality hand made bikes.

    - Clever Cycles, sells Bike Friday folders and some Danish made utility/cargo bikes.

    There are probably other shops in town that would be a good fit - I just happen to know of those two because they are both along my normal ride home. How any other U.S. cities would have TWO bike shops carrying folders, within a mile of each other?

    -Lee

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    Quote Originally Posted by makeinu View Post
    Who's going to pay those prices? There are much better deals out there on folding bikes. For example, the Pacific's Carryme is a similar bike of similar and/or better quality at a much better price point.
    I've never seen the Carryme in a local bike shop. Support is critical for any folding bike and that's why the Strida needs to be in an LBS.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by stridaguy View Post
    hi all, I am the president of Areaware. It is true that we are new to the bike biz but we are an office full of avid 2 wheelers (I ride a Strida, a Pashley-Moulton TSR and a TidalForce X Montague folder for long distances) and we have a lot of access to the design and media worlds where we think the Strida can really thrive. We just finished InterBike in Las Vegas and have setup about 2 dozen dealers nation wide. Design Within Reach and the Museum of Modern Art will be carrying the Strida which will give it much needed Blue Chip exposure in the US. Please feel free to email any thoughts or suggestions you have to how we can do a steller job in getting the Strida rolling. I believe that the Strida is a unique position to take the ride and carry and display commuting world by storm. It is the easiest folding bike to carry with its belt drive and light weight, it gets tons of attention on the street because it doesn't look like a Brompton or one of it's many legitimate and illegitimate siblings and it looks great hanging on your wall! The only thing stopping it from dominating unfortunately is its steep price. Margins are razor thin (the bike is made in Taiwan from many custom parts that are not massed produced) and as Lee pointed out we are not looking to make a mint on Strida but rather to add an important eco aware product to our portfoliio.

    cheers

    Noel Wiggins
    noel@areaware.com
    This is good news.

    I wish you guys and girls the best of luck. Are you planning to have more local bike shops carry the product? Where do you stand with support in terms of parts?

  15. #15
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by makeinu View Post
    Who's going to pay those prices? There are much better deals out there on folding bikes. For example, the Pacific's Carryme is a similar bike of similar and/or better quality at a much better price point.
    I have a Strida3 and I'm a big fan of the design and elegance.

    But I have to agree with Makeinu on this one. At $500 for a Strida3 and $800 for a Strida5, there's just too many other alternatives which offer much more value.

    Too bad... I wish Strida would set their business model for high volume sales, and let more people enjoy their cool design.

  16. #16
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    I also think the price of the Strida is a bit high. No doubt Pacific Cycles and Dahon and others make cool bikes at lower price points. But value is subjective - it's worth the price if someone wants some of the Strida's unique features.

    Unique features: Belt drive, terrific mechanical simplicity and low maintenance, big enough wheels to negotiate potholes and curbs but a fast and small enough fold to carry onto crowded buses and trains, eye-catching style.

    AND YET... I'm a cheapskate, no denying. I bought my Strida grey-market on eBay and paid around $400. Money well spent, I love the bike. But it's unlikely I could justify $700-$800 to upgrade to a new one. I'll be watching eBay for a bargain/used one.

  17. #17
    Bromptonaut 14R's Avatar
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    An interesting review os the Strida bike available for sale on EBay UK...Original source at the end of the posting:

    You are bidding on a Strida 3

    Possibly the worst folding bike in history; but that is just my opinion.

    Here is a description of the bike:

    It does not really Fold - it sort of splits in half (see picture) - and then is supposed to stand upright or be laid down. Laid down it represents a tripping hazard of uncomfortable proportions; standing up unless you immobilise the wheels using the brake loops on the handlebars (a design afterthought if ever I saw one). A magnet holds it all together and is not very satisfactory being either too much or not enough and the bike is either impossible to unfold or comes unfolded at the wrong time
    It is not convenient to carry - much is made of the ability to roll it along - do not be fooled it is akward piece of kit to lift and carry and even roll along; especially upstairs at stations etc.
    You look a right dork riding one - the rear mounted position gives you the impression that you are on a penny farthing - Viscount Linley may have had a go at looking cool but the overall reaction is one of undisguised hilarity and mirth - and they are not laughing with you.
    Not suitable for London - some seven inner tubes later I would conclude that the nature of the frame and tyre configuration is such that pinch flats are a way of life with this "bike" - this particular bike is supplied with a flat back tyre (sorry sick of changing them), but comes with spare inner tube and set of tyre spanners (if you weigh more than 80kg you will need them a lot). The bike has also been fitted with a stronger rear tyre supplied by Strida who appear to tacitly acknowledge that there is an issue. The tyre is the standard tyre used on a Brompton (strange that!) - however - you still get flats. If you weigh very little, only want to cycle a short distance on flat well repaired roads you will probably get away with it.
    Design Defects/Product Recalls - for a bike that is supposed to be the pinnacle of design it has had two major structural issues in 12 months of ownership: first, the ball joint at the top of the A frame cracked and had to be replaced (an engineer admitted this had been an issue, although there was no formal recall) slightly off putting when the bike collapses while riding; secondly, there was a formal product recall (see website: www.strida.co.uk ) in relation to the steering pin that apparently could work loose. I have had both these items professionally replaced and the bike has been serviced.
    Trendy but broadly useless Customer Service - lots of talk about customer service and focus, but not much action; after a year of constant issues I decided enough was enough and that I had given it my best shot but that bike was either a lemon or was just a design dud; after four weeks of delays and prevarications I was tartly informed that the would give me a 35% refund and I could pay for delivery and that the bike had "no frame issues" - well not since the last product recall in any event! After a bit of haggling this went up to 65% but I would have to pay for shipping. I felt that selling on Ebay would be more fun. Interestingly I have noted on my daily commute that three Strida's have come and gone in my 12 months of ownership and been replaced by something more suitable.
    Other stuff you should know - the kevlar belt slips - this was particularly noticeable on the new bike (apprently factory tuned!) but was better after it was adjusted properly during its service; it comes with a couple of different colour mudguards (green and blue) - it also has the rubber muguard extension fitted (actually a "bribe" that came with the replacement steering pin!). It is not what you would call brilliantly clean, however it has been fully serviced. Funnily enough I will not ship it as I cannot think how to pack it and I would not waste my time so London purchasers or enthusiastic owners only please.
    Specification - just over 12 months old - ridden about 5 miles a day during week; orange mud guards fitted (plus rubber extension); "performance kit" - folding handle bars and folding pedals, rear rack, new rear tyre (non-standard supplied by Strida), new steering pin, new ball joint, serviced by Velorution in London. Flat back tyre following last pinch flat - new inner tube and tyre spanner supplied for free, plus pump (so that you can check pressures every time you ride it)
    Oh My Dear you mean you are actually going to bid - if after all this you still think that you want one of these then I look forward to meeting you; I will give you a free go on a Brompton just so that you will realise what a huge error you have made and that notwithstanding the supposedly bargain basement price it is, indeed very hard to drive a bargain - well for any distance without getting a flat or possibly it falling to pieces. Please ensure that you have a helmet. For blokes please note that if you come to an abrupt stop your front bits will clonk the A frame quite hard - I have watering eyes to prove this.
    There is plenty of praise and adulation for this supposed design masterpiece elsewhere; but you will not find any here. Happy bidding...


    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...5931%26fvi%3D1

    If the link doesn't work, it's eBay.co.uk

    Item number: 120170405931

    At least an interesting post.

    14R

  18. #18
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Very interesting marketing approach - This bike is crap, don't buy it!

  19. #19
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    We are definitely going to open a LBS in every major commuting town. As far as price goes I don't think the Strida will ever be mass produced so it will always be an eccentric bike for those who want something less pedestrian between their legs! If you look at what consumers pay to have 3 ipods in their lives.. As far as reliabilty after 20 years of design improvements the Strida is an amazing trouble free engineering marvel. I have been riding a Strida for over a year and I still get a huge kick each time I go for ride - and it is contagious - you should see the amount of attention it attracts. Kind of like carrying a puppy..

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 14R View Post
    An interesting review os the Strida bike available for sale on EBay UK
    14R
    If it doesn't go up more I'll bid - I could do with a newer Strida - sounds like it may only need a new rear wheel - crazy guy !

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by stridaguy View Post
    We are definitely going to open a LBS in every major commuting town. As far as price goes I don't think the Strida will ever be mass produced so it will always be an eccentric bike for those who want something less pedestrian between their legs! If you look at what consumers pay to have 3 ipods in their lives.. As far as reliabilty after 20 years of design improvements the Strida is an amazing trouble free engineering marvel. I have been riding a Strida for over a year and I still get a huge kick each time I go for ride - and it is contagious - you should see the amount of attention it attracts. Kind of like carrying a puppy..
    The thing is, Mark Sanders always seems to say in interviews that he designed the Strida to be simple and affordable. So why isn't it affordable? It used to be. Why have prices suddenly skyrocketed and margins are razor thin?

    What's the advantage of such a simple design if it doesn't cost less?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by makeinu View Post
    The thing is, Mark Sanders always seems to say in interviews that he designed the Strida to be simple and affordable. So why isn't it affordable? It used to be. Why have prices suddenly skyrocketed and margins are razor thin?

    What's the advantage of such a simple design if it doesn't cost less?
    Mass production is key as the Strida does not use a lot of standard bike parts. Right now it is a hand built enthusiast machine and judging by the market cap for single speed bikes I believe it will always be. Actually adjusted for inflation and considering the high grade componants there really has been a price decrease. This is from 1999:

    Chicago Tribune : Sunday August 29, 1999

    Travel: Section 8

    The Resourceful Traveler: by Toni Stroud

    Gear

    Strida portable bicycle
    (Strida, $ 549)
    As this thing unfolds, it sort of resembles a praying mantis stretching long, ungainly limbs. Similar to the insect, the Strida, at 22 pounds, is light on its feet, or should we say, on its 16-inch injection-molded wheel. The single speed bike is propelled by pedal power, applied to a greaseless Kevlar belt drive. Hub brakes cease and desist all motion. It's triangular, rustproof frame fits riders from 5-feet-4 inches to 6-feet-4 inches and up to 215 pounds. Folded, it measures 44-by-20-by-20, and for $75, you can even purchase a carrying case to put it in. Shipping/handling charges begin at $34 which isn't so much for a giant "bug" that can eat pavement as efficiently as a mantis can dispatch a nice, juicy fly. (800-787-4322 or at www.strida.com) Toni Stroud's email address is tstroud@tribune.com



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    American Way; September 13, 1999

    Foldable, Totable Bike: by Jill Becker

    Wunderbar! Fantastique! Jolly Good! That's what Europeans have been saying about the innovative Strida bicycle for years. Now available in North America for $549, the ultra portable, rustproof bike folds and unfolds in seconds, weighs just twenty-two pounds, and is a fun new way to see the sights. For details, call (800) 787-4322.




    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    Improper Bostonian : December 2-15, 1998

    Cute Little Commute

    Bike commuters can go everywhere within 3 miles or so on Strida2 and bring its tactfully folded frame everywhere too. Call 1-800-787-4322 or hit the Web at www.strida.com

    Biking's sibling to the Superstarlett VW Bug, here comes Strida2 ($649), a foldable bike for in-town commuting, invented by an Englishman. The rider sits on a rather tall triangle zipping along with the air of a crowing clown or a triumphant child, having flicked the bike open with four easy clicks that take about seven seconds. That's a less bulky job than the baby-carriage-unfolding its compared to.

    Strida2 weighs 22 pounds (up to fourteen pounds lighter than other commuting bikes). Simplicity is the rule: only one tube (down from twelve on the other bikes), and very simple injection-molded wheels. Most striking of all, there is no greasy belt, but instead a rubbery belt drive. Collapsed, Strida2 rolls along easily, takes the T politely, likes elevators and the backs of cars. Desirable as it is, Strida2 is almost impossible to steal(but does require a lock). Pure as a teepee, it's touted "the transportation tool of the 21st century."




    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    L.A. Daily News : August 14, 1999

    For cheap wheels, with little space, welcome to the fold

    Good news for the space-challenged: a collapsible bike that quickly folds into something that resembles a wheeled walking stick.

    It's called a Strida, and its manufacturers hope this strange contraption will be a hit on college campuses, in corporate office parks, at marinas -- and all those other places where people have only a little space and a need for cheap wheels. The aluminum A-frame bike, designed in the space-starved United Kingdom in 1987 and now available in the United States, is designed to fold up into a 22-pound bundle in three steps. At $499, it costs a little more than the average bike, but it won't rust, the Kevlar chain doesn't need grease, and it requires no maintenance.

    But it sure does look awkward. The advantage over standard bikes: It's easy to lock up, and it can be stowed in a trunk, on a boat, in a closet or the corner of a college classroom, which makes it "virtually theft-proof," according to the manufacturer.

    In fact, they're so sure of their product, they're offering a 60-day test ride. Don't like it? Fold it up and send it back. College linebackers need not apply. The frame is rated to only 215 pounds.

    For more information or to order one, visit the Web site www.strida.com or call (800) 787-4322.

    Phil Davis.

  23. #23
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by makeinu View Post
    The thing is, Mark Sanders always seems to say in interviews that he designed the Strida to be simple and affordable. So why isn't it affordable? It used to be. Why have prices suddenly skyrocketed and margins are razor thin?

    What's the advantage of such a simple design if it doesn't cost less?
    Exactly, their business model doesn't match their stated vision.

    I say this as a lament of a lost opportunity for the company. It's a really cool bike. I think the Strida could be a big impact product, but their lackluster distribution strategy - meh... As it currently stands, it'll be confined to a very small niche, which is regrettable.

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    Strida and CarryMe are completely different bikes, CarryMe has 8" wheels and a max rider of 85kg or 170 lb.

    Rather than opening Strida stores, I would say try to sell them from existing fashion shops, Starbucks, Apple stores ect. You might even sell out of fancy bars and liquor stores, they make a good bike for drunks, Dahon is too complicated to unfold once you have had one to many. You might even look to stores in Grand Central/Penn station/WTC in NYC.

    I personally think most people would be better off spending their $800 on a 20" Dahon Mu XL. The Strida is better optimized for the fashion conscious, somewhat tall, female commuter. There are plenty of those in NYC, and they have the $$$ to buy one.
    2000 Montague CX, I do not recommend it, but still ride it.
    Strida 3, I recommend it for rides < 10mi wo steep hills.
    2006 Rowbike 720 Sport, I recommend it as an exercise bike.
    1996 Birdy, Recommend.
    Wieleder CARiBIKE (folding), decent frame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by geo8rge View Post
    Rather than opening Strida stores, I would say try to sell them from existing fashion shops, Starbucks, Apple stores etc...
    You've forgotten (or at least failed to mention) one of the first places Strida was first sold in USA: The Sharper Image.

    That floor space is now occupied by the $700 Mobiky Genius.

    It's a no-brainer to point out that the higher the price, the more of a niche product anything becomes. The "right" price is whatever the market will bear.
    Last edited by lee_rimar; 10-15-07 at 07:04 AM.

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