Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 25 of 25
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
    My Bikes
    Dahon
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Folding bicycle rejected on Boston's MBTA

    I do plenty of business in areas of Boston located near the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's Green Line subway stations (i.e., Boston Public Library at Copley Square; Kinko's stores at Government Center and Coolidge Corner, etc.). Riverside Station in Newton (Green Line "D" Branch) is the closest rapid transit station to my job. According to the transit authority's "Bikes on the T" rules, regular non-folding bicycles are entirely prohibited from being brought onboard MBTA Green Line trains. Having said that, I smartly purchased a Dahon folding bicycle back in April 2007 in an effort to deter the Green Line's strict bicycle rules. It states that folding or collapsible bikes are the only bicycles that the Green Line will allow onboard its trains ..... but it seems like not all of the MBTA's employees are aware of this rule.

    After purchasing the folding bicycle, I successfully boarded Green Line trains on my first seven different occasions with the folding bike in my possession from April through mid-October. The bicycle was in complete lockdown prior to boarding the train and carried inside of a bicycle bag at all times. During this period, I ran into no conflicts whatsoever in conjunction with the Green Line's bicycle rules.

    Then came the week of October 28th-November 3rd, which was by far the most challenging for me. Apparently, I happened to run into a mix of employees who either understood the bicycle rules or didn't. On Monday, October 29th, 2007 and again on October 31st, I boarded a Green Line "D" Branch train at Brookline Village Station for outbound service to Riverside Station without a problem. It was only 5:50 in the morning, and as you might expect traveling in the reverse-commuting direction, the train was not even close to being crowded. The Green Line conductor saw the folding bike and was very polite about it. Back to Monday, however, I boarded MBTA Bus Route 70 at the Central Square, Waltham stop with the folding bicycle. The bus driver was rudely inconsiderate of my decision to bring the folder onboard and said that next time I need to use the bus bicycle rack that is mounted in the front. From a personal standpoint, using the bus bike racks have its major disadvantages - such as falling off if secured improperly or the potential of theft if the bus is stopped at a bus stop or traffic light - and the transit authority is not responsible for those types of issues. This explains why I prefer folding up the bike and bringing it onboard the bus.

    Then on Friday, November 2nd, I showed up again at Brookline Village Station. Once again, it was before 6 a.m. and my desired service was in the outbound direction. The train was definitely not crowded, with plenty of empty seats available. The bicycle was, of course, folded. However, it was a different train operator this time. I tapped my CharlieCard to pay my fare, and then suddenly she says to me in a very loud and angry tone of voice: "Please take that bike off of this train!"

    Now the worst part of this scenario wasn't so much the fact that I am actually obeying the rules and yet I am rejected of getting train service simply because of my bike, but instead I just wasted $1.70 in exchange for no ride! Couldn't she have put her hand over the "target" before I tapped the card? I was not rushing onboard to try to sneak a fast one on her; I simply took my time prior to paying the fare, and then she spoke her mind.

    One other issue came up back in June when I brought the same Dahon folding bicycle into the Red Line's Central Square Station in Cambridge at 5:48 p.m. This would fall under the category of "no bikes allowed on any subway trains during rush hour", except that folding bicycles have the distinct advantage of being brought onboard trains at this time of day. The MBTA Inspector warned me (again after I had already paid the fare!) that I wasn't supposed to ride the system at all with the bicycle in my possession. Again though, folding bicycles are the lone exception to this rule, and that's what I was going by upon entering the station.

    Due to all of this, I am planning on purchasing a larger bicycle bag that will completely cover the bicycle entirely when folded down. I am looking for a bag that will have no part of the bicycle exposed when folded, an idea to make subway personnel and bus drivers think that I'm just simply carrying airport luggage. Does anyone else here have any suggestions as to what to buy? My bicycle dimensions, when folded in its most compact position, is 18" wide, 36" long, and 32" tall from the floor to the seat. Does anyone else have suggestions also as to what I should tell train operations if they deny access when a folding bicycle is supposed to be allowed onboard? The Green Line "D" Branch, in particular, is not a short-distance local ride and this is why I prefer using the MBTA to mix bicycle rides with rapid transit instead of biking the whole way from Boston to Newton and in some cases further.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,076
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 61woodsquare View Post
    ...Due to all of this, I am planning on purchasing a larger bicycle bag that will completely cover the bicycle entirely when folded down. I am looking for a bag that will have no part of the bicycle exposed when folded, an idea to make subway personnel and bus drivers think that I'm just simply carrying airport luggage. Does anyone else here have any suggestions as to what to buy? My bicycle dimensions, when folded in its most compact position, is 18" wide, 36" long, and 32" tall from the floor to the seat. Does anyone else have suggestions also as to what I should tell train operations if they deny access when a folding bicycle is supposed to be allowed onboard? The Green Line "D" Branch, in particular, is not a short-distance local ride and this is why I prefer using the MBTA to mix bicycle rides with rapid transit instead of biking the whole way from Boston to Newton and in some cases further.
    Thank you.
    I am wondering what type of bike bag you used to transport your bike. Did it have the bike company's logo sewn or printed on like "Dahon" or "Brompton" on it? If so, that might alert the ever hawk eyed transit worker that you have a folding bike in your possession. And the most important thing a good bike cover can do is to completely cover the bike to pass it off as luggage as you pointed out above. One of the negative things that the growing popularity of these bikes will create in the years ahead is being kicked off public transit since more and more commuters will travel on trains and buses than before with or without a folding bike in their possession. Any package larger than a briefcase or a purse will be suspect.

    But for now, I recommend that if you take anything not protected by state or federal law such as a baby stroller or a wheelchair (which takes more space than a folding bike and does marks fellow passengers with wheel debris) is to use bags that completely cover the bike without any identifing logos or images on the bag. That is why I make my own now unless it is another purchased bag with no logo of any kind. See my Flickr photo for the bags I use (and very easy to make):

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/world-of-folding-bicycles/988690181/in/set-72157601331380862/

    I hope you don't run into problems with such low brained characters again.
    Last edited by folder fanatic; 12-01-07 at 01:09 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Foldable Two's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, Washington and Ocean Shores, Washington, USA
    My Bikes
    2 - 2007 Custom Bike Fridays, 2 - 2009 Bike Friday Pocket 8's, Gravity 29'er SS, 2 - 8-spd Windsor City Bikes, 1973 Raleigh 20
    Posts
    1,306
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Besides getting a bag that covers the whole bike, how about carrying a copy of their own rules to share with them?

    Otherwise, it's just your word against theirs.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's really annoying that everything sold for bikes has the vendor's brand logo in a massive font. Even new bikes have brand logos on seats, cranks, handlebars, grips, frame, mudguards, seatpost, tyres etc. It looks horrible and can only serve to attract thieves on expensive bikes.

  5. #5
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,076
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cholmeleian View Post
    It's really annoying that everything sold for bikes has the vendor's brand logo in a massive font. Even new bikes have brand logos on seats, cranks, handlebars, grips, frame, mudguards, seatpost, tyres etc. It looks horrible and can only serve to attract thieves on expensive bikes.
    I agree. But remember with such a portable device such as a folder, you have an option that no none else has with other types of bikes-you can always bag it. So it is covered up from prying eyes-like ladies's undergarments are supposed to be.

  6. #6
    low and laid back atom bomb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Newton, MA
    My Bikes
    'bent hi-racer, 'bent trike, folder, road bike, longtail cargo bike
    Posts
    130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Mbta

    The MBTA certainly wants no more bad press these days. Contact the MBTA and report on your experiences, then request a letter from someone in authority there that confirms their folding bike policy. Show the letter when you get stopped. OR, better yet, write a letter to the Globe, cc'd to the Media people at the MBTA. It seems all you need to do is hold them to their own rules. (not that it's necessarily easy to do that...)
    Atom Bomb

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6,128
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow..... I had no idea Boston was so anti-cycle with regards to folding bikes. You're going to have to fight them. Below are the instructions lifted off the page. Someone did the same for Amtrak and you're going to have to do the same for Boston.

    By the way, the rules with the bus are not that you are allowed to bring it inside the cabin. It's probably understood that you must use the bike rack.

    Folding Bikes
    Folding bikes are allowed on Subway, Commuter Rail and buses at any time when folded in the most compact position and carried in a carrying case intended for that purpose.

    http://www.mbta.com/riding_the_t/bikes/

  8. #8
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
    My Bikes
    Dahon
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Folder fanatic": Yes, my current bicycle bag does have a logo saying Dahon. I had the same concept as you did in the fact that I want to replace my current bag with a bag that does not have the Dahon logo or any other bicycle company's name.

    I saw your photo of the predominately covered folding bike, and I must say that it looks excellently compact! How large are your bike's wheels? I have a 20-inch wheel, which may or may not be too large for travel onboard trains and buses. I usually travel anywhere between 4 to 8 miles on the bicycle alone; although last weekend, I did shopping on "Black Friday" and rode my Dahon folding bike from the Cleveland Circle section of Boston to the shopping plazas in the town of Milford, Massachusetts. For those of you not familar with the Boston area, that's a 25-mile bicycle ride one-way, 50 miles roundtrip, and I still have enough physical energy to return home without being completely fried.

  9. #9
    Bicycling Gnome
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    55.0N 1.59W
    Posts
    1,877
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Foldable Two View Post
    Besides getting a bag that covers the whole bike, how about carrying a copy of their own rules to share with them?

    Otherwise, it's just your word against theirs.
    That's what I was thinking. Rules are rules. They have to apply them until they change them. Having said that, covering the thing completely isn't a bad idea. It should save some conflict with unpleasant people who don't deserve to have a job anyway. People who work in running the railways ought to be more customer centered than they are at times.
    “Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live." - Mark Twain

  10. #10
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,076
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 61woodsquare View Post
    "Folder fanatic": Yes, my current bicycle bag does have a logo saying Dahon. I had the same concept as you did in the fact that I want to replace my current bag with a bag that does not have the Dahon logo or any other bicycle company's name.

    I saw your photo of the predominately covered folding bike, and I must say that it looks excellently compact! How large are your bike's wheels? I have a 20-inch wheel, which may or may not be too large for travel onboard trains and buses. I usually travel anywhere between 4 to 8 miles on the bicycle alone; although last weekend, I did shopping on "Black Friday" and rode my Dahon folding bike from the Cleveland Circle section of Boston to the shopping plazas in the town of Milford, Massachusetts. For those of you not familar with the Boston area, that's a 25-mile bicycle ride one-way, 50 miles roundtrip, and I still have enough physical energy to return home without being completely fried.
    I actually own 3 folders: My Dahon Boardwalk is a 20" wheel one, my little Piccolo is the one photographed in the drawstring bag is 16 inches or ISO 305, and my Brompton photographed on trains and buses is also 16 inches but at ISO 349 is more like my Boardwalk in wheel size. My sister went to one of your many universities in the Boston area and got her Mechanical Engineering degree there. She did once remarked that Boston is not a very bike friendly town when she was there. Perhaps you simply ran into an extreme case of "bike prejudice" that tends to crop up in the most unexpected places-like public transportation. I never can figure it out.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6,128
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by folder fanatic View Post
    She did once remarked that Boston is not a very bike friendly town when she was there. Perhaps you simply ran into an extreme case of "bike prejudice" that tends to crop up in the most unexpected places-like public transportation. I never can figure it out.
    Boston isn't very bike friendly is correct. The city feels like it's enclosed by a huge highway. Many bridges do not allow bike access and the main streets are too fast.

  12. #12
    Weakling
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Sweden, Europe
    My Bikes
    Microbike, but I want to own a Carryme
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe we are lucky that we are so few taking a folded bike on trains. If that would be very frequent they have to be stricter or not allow it at all. To cover them completely in a no name brand bag seems wise.

  13. #13
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
    My Bikes
    Dahon
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You know what I find ridiculous is that the neighboring city of Cambridge has more visible bicycle lanes than all of Boston combined, which is 12 miles larger in size than Cambridge. Much of Cambridge's bicycle lanes are on major streets such as Massachusetts Avenue, Vassar Street, Main Street, and Hampshire Street. Even the town of Brookline has bicycle lanes and signs saying "Share the Road" every three blocks on Beacon Street.

    Back to taking a folding bicycle on the MBTA's Green Line on the Boston transit system, this seems like a disappointing violation. They allow folders on the other three main subway lines (Red Line, Orange Line and the Blue Line). Since most of you on here may not know the MBTA, let me say that the current Blue Line trains are rather small and cramped - I'm very surprised that they allow bikes (including non-folders) on that subway line period. Although the Green Line is considered by the authority as "light rail service", many people - including myself - clearly see it as a regular subway line. This alone makes it feel unfair to be denied service just because it has somewhat the shape of a trolley instead of the shape of a rapid-transit subway car. It also has more station stops than the Red, Orange, and Blue Lines put together, and without access to it, travel to Boston's MetroWest communities is 10 miles longer on the bike on dangerously-congested streets such as Commonwealth Avenue - similar to what "Dahon.Steve" pointed out above.

    I feel like the only serious restriction to bringing a folder onboard the Green Line should be in the spring and summer seasons when on Boston Red Sox game days, thousands of die-hard fans try to squeeze their bodies onto the train to get from Park Street Station to Kenmore. This is not only a safety hazard for bringing a folding bicycle on the Green Line during Red Sox game days, but this huge load of fans causes delays, so I would be better off anyway just biking the short 2-mile trip myself on street-level from downtown Boston to Kenmore Square.

    I'm planning on calling the MBTA today to discuss my recent problem on the Green Line. This is a situation in which apparently the authority's rules are useless and not being obeyed.

  14. #14
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Folding bike on MBTA

    I agree, they are not aware of the rules and the drivers and inspectors feel that they have the power to change the rules. Last night I got on the 350 bus at 8:30 and put my folding Dahon in the folded position between the seats and sat in the same seat. The driver said he had to radio his supervisor to ask him about my bike. He then said his supervisor said I have to take the bus off the bike. I pulled up the MBTA website and the bicycle rules which has a welcoming headline: "BRING YOUR BIKE ON THE BUS" - "You can bring your bike on the bus if:
    The bus is equipped with an external rack Check here for bike rack-equipped bus routes.
    You have a folded folding bike.
    The bus is not a shuttle bus substituting for Commuter Rail or Subway service."

    I showed him this and an official MBTA printed leaflet too with the same. He was rude and blanked me off and went in his truck and said he was on the phone and put up his window. Then three Arlington Police cars arrived and they came on the bus and marched me off the bus with my bike and backpack full of shopping and a shopping bag. I was surrounded by at least six Arlington police officers on the sidewalk and the Transit Police drove up with one T police officer. Whenever I tried to show any of them the rules on my phone or the printed version, they said they did not care and did not want to see it or hear about it. The Transit Police was the most sarcastic of all of them. So it is 80 degrees, humid and I have perishable food. I was very embarrassed, as I used to live in Arlington. It has taken me all morning to gt through to the MBTA and I talked to a supervisor (who was amazed by all this) and a claims administrator in their legal department. I told them that I want their assurance in the future about their policies and I want a letter from the MBTA that I am authorized to take my bike on he bus in a fold up position and that I have the right to remain on the bus. Otherwise how can I plan anything. How can I be sure that I can be somewhere for my 4 year old son, to feed him or pick him up from school, for example?

    It appears that there is a huge disconnect between the office staff and the staff in the field. It is interesting to not that their claims form request hotline is full and is not accepting any more messages.

    Quote Originally Posted by 61woodsquare View Post
    I do plenty of business in areas of Boston located near the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's Green Line subway stations (i.e., Boston Public Library at Copley Square; Kinko's stores at Government Center and Coolidge Corner, etc.). Riverside Station in Newton (Green Line "D" Branch) is the closest rapid transit station to my job. According to the transit authority's "Bikes on the T" rules, regular non-folding bicycles are entirely prohibited from being brought onboard MBTA Green Line trains. Having said that, I smartly purchased a Dahon folding bicycle back in April 2007 in an effort to deter the Green Line's strict bicycle rules. It states that folding or collapsible bikes are the only bicycles that the Green Line will allow onboard its trains ..... but it seems like not all of the MBTA's employees are aware of this rule.

    After purchasing the folding bicycle, I successfully boarded Green Line trains on my first seven different occasions with the folding bike in my possession from April through mid-October. The bicycle was in complete lockdown prior to boarding the train and carried inside of a bicycle bag at all times. During this period, I ran into no conflicts whatsoever in conjunction with the Green Line's bicycle rules.

    Then came the week of October 28th-November 3rd, which was by far the most challenging for me. Apparently, I happened to run into a mix of employees who either understood the bicycle rules or didn't. On Monday, October 29th, 2007 and again on October 31st, I boarded a Green Line "D" Branch train at Brookline Village Station for outbound service to Riverside Station without a problem. It was only 5:50 in the morning, and as you might expect traveling in the reverse-commuting direction, the train was not even close to being crowded. The Green Line conductor saw the folding bike and was very polite about it. Back to Monday, however, I boarded MBTA Bus Route 70 at the Central Square, Waltham stop with the folding bicycle. The bus driver was rudely inconsiderate of my decision to bring the folder onboard and said that next time I need to use the bus bicycle rack that is mounted in the front. From a personal standpoint, using the bus bike racks have its major disadvantages - such as falling off if secured improperly or the potential of theft if the bus is stopped at a bus stop or traffic light - and the transit authority is not responsible for those types of issues. This explains why I prefer folding up the bike and bringing it onboard the bus.

    Then on Friday, November 2nd, I showed up again at Brookline Village Station. Once again, it was before 6 a.m. and my desired service was in the outbound direction. The train was definitely not crowded, with plenty of empty seats available. The bicycle was, of course, folded. However, it was a different train operator this time. I tapped my CharlieCard to pay my fare, and then suddenly she says to me in a very loud and angry tone of voice: "Please take that bike off of this train!"

    Now the worst part of this scenario wasn't so much the fact that I am actually obeying the rules and yet I am rejected of getting train service simply because of my bike, but instead I just wasted $1.70 in exchange for no ride! Couldn't she have put her hand over the "target" before I tapped the card? I was not rushing onboard to try to sneak a fast one on her; I simply took my time prior to paying the fare, and then she spoke her mind.

    One other issue came up back in June when I brought the same Dahon folding bicycle into the Red Line's Central Square Station in Cambridge at 5:48 p.m. This would fall under the category of "no bikes allowed on any subway trains during rush hour", except that folding bicycles have the distinct advantage of being brought onboard trains at this time of day. The MBTA Inspector warned me (again after I had already paid the fare!) that I wasn't supposed to ride the system at all with the bicycle in my possession. Again though, folding bicycles are the lone exception to this rule, and that's what I was going by upon entering the station.

    Due to all of this, I am planning on purchasing a larger bicycle bag that will completely cover the bicycle entirely when folded down. I am looking for a bag that will have no part of the bicycle exposed when folded, an idea to make subway personnel and bus drivers think that I'm just simply carrying airport luggage. Does anyone else here have any suggestions as to what to buy? My bicycle dimensions, when folded in its most compact position, is 18" wide, 36" long, and 32" tall from the floor to the seat. Does anyone else have suggestions also as to what I should tell train operations if they deny access when a folding bicycle is supposed to be allowed onboard? The Green Line "D" Branch, in particular, is not a short-distance local ride and this is why I prefer using the MBTA to mix bicycle rides with rapid transit instead of biking the whole way from Boston to Newton and in some cases further.

    Thank you.

  15. #15
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    39,191
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Get a copy of any rule that is applicable, on MTBA letterhead, from them,
    and have an educate the little guy copy to hand out,
    as required when 'X" dreams up another rule.. on their own..

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bay Area, SF California
    My Bikes
    Citizen Tokyo, A-Bike, Dahon Boardwalk D6, Dahon Boardwalk D7, Dahon Curve D3, Dahon Mu XL, BF Tikit2, Dahon Speed TR, Dahon Curve SL.
    Posts
    1,487
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    hi,

    i just went to MBTA website and it states that:
    Rules and Regulations

    Hours


    • Folding bicycles are allowed at all times on all vehicles when folded.
    • Please follow MBTA staff instructions at all times.
    • Exceptions apply during holidays and special events.

    http://www.mbta.com/riding_the_t/bikes/

    so why don't you make a copy of this and show it to the driver everytime you board.

  17. #17
    Decrepit Member Scooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Francisco California
    My Bikes
    2007 Waterford 953 RS-22
    Posts
    8,535
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You guys realize this is a four year-old thread, right?
    - Stan

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bay Area, SF California
    My Bikes
    Citizen Tokyo, A-Bike, Dahon Boardwalk D6, Dahon Boardwalk D7, Dahon Curve D3, Dahon Mu XL, BF Tikit2, Dahon Speed TR, Dahon Curve SL.
    Posts
    1,487
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Scooper View Post
    You guys realize this is a four year-old thread, right?
    deng....i did not. thanks for the heads up. talk about fast fingers....
    Last edited by vmaniqui; 07-08-11 at 02:29 PM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member badrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    362
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    the OP was in 2007, but looks like charlescross' incident was recent.

  20. #20
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,076
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by badrad View Post
    the OP was in 2007, but looks like charlescross' incident was recent.
    No matter what the date actually is, bike prejudice never seems to end and rears it's ugly head in the most inopportune time. If anything, while my bike fleet has dropped the 2 Dahon bikes I had in 2007, I still make my own nicely fitting bike bags completely covering the newer ones I have now.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    seacoast nh / suburban hartford
    My Bikes
    swift folder(alfine 8, marathon plus, crossrack, klickfix freepack)
    Posts
    149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    good luck so far with bigger swift folded on green D line. about 5 rides

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Ft Lauderdale
    My Bikes
    R20 aka project frankentwenty
    Posts
    66
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    At least someone used the search feature. I'd tell the staff to fk off because I'm carrying a sack of potatoes.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    London
    My Bikes
    Mezzo D9, 2012 Giant Avail 2
    Posts
    654
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think this tells you about how different towns treat their commuters.

    In London - which is not perfect - the staff on stations and vehicles treat me as a customer with respect (with or without a bike). The transit police are there for enforcement and my safety and as a fare paying passenger I'm only ever aware of them looking after me.

    When I visit Melbourne, my home town, things on public transport have got ugly. Even going through the gates at the station with a valid ticket, I feel the eyes of the transport police on me, waiting for me to slip up. I feel not a customer but a suspect. This is a big change of the last decade or so.

    Sounds like Boston is more like Melbourne. Disobey "Please follow MBTA staff instructions at all times" and they frog march you off transport. Could you imagine any other service provider behaving like that?

    I don't think cycles are the problem, it's way deeper than that.
    2008 Mezzo D9
    2012 Giant Avail 2

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,013
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Best bike bag? Get a painters drop cloth, secure with bungee cords. If anyone questions you pretend not to speak english, respond "hospital is on bus travel?" to all questions.

    City buses a problem as they tend to be crowded and have narrow aisles. So I can't completely blame them complaining about large packages.

    Sometimes having a recent copy of the rules will help in such arguments.
    2000 Montague CX, I do not recommend it, but still ride it.
    Strida 3, I recommend it for rides < 10mi wo steep hills.
    2006 Rowbike 720 Sport, I recommend it as an exercise bike.
    1996 Birdy, Recommend.
    Wieleder CARiBIKE (folding), decent frame.

  25. #25
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
    My Bikes
    Dahon
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Charlescross": I am so sorry that you had to go through all of that ridiculous nonsense when in fact you are obeying the rules. There is a significant advantage of having a folded bicycle in your possession. Not all MBTA buses have external racks on the outside front of the bus. Some buses previously had a rack and then removed it at some point. With a folded bike, there's no need to worry about whether or not a rack is present. I always fold my bike before the arrival of any MBTA bus to avoid taking chances. The MBTA bus drivers and inspectors need to realize that rules "are rules" for a reason. Furthermore, a folded bicycle is practically the same size as one piece of typical airport luggage and smaller than your average baby carriage. This is all unnecessary drama.

    You mentioned Arlington was either your intended destination or your departure point; where were you headed to or coming from? I ask this because the Route 350 is a long-distance local bus route from Alewife Station in Cambridge to North Burlington and I certainly would much rather be on the bus than bicycle-riding through four suburban towns.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •