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Old 01-22-08, 09:10 PM   #26
Dahon.Steve
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Originally Posted by makeinu View Post
The fact that you think my favorite bike is flexy could mean that some of the other bikes I'm considering could be good for me too. If you don't mind me asking, how much do you weigh?

It's also interesting to hear you say the Strida is faster than the Carryme. Alvin previously posted a different opinion:

Of course, he was talking about the Strida 3, but I haven't heard of any drastic performance gaps between the Strida 3 and the Strida 5.
I weight 165 and overweight by 15 lbs. I will lose that weight but I don't think it was an issue as the CarryMe could flex at 150 lbs. This may not be a bad thing because that flex gives a degree a comfort since it lacks any suspension. It may actually be a design feature. Overall, it's not a bad bike and I still might get it. The sample I had might have had the clamps lose or maybe the bike wasn't unfolded correctly. I doubt it but it's a possibility. The CarryMe is slower but I'm sure you could ride it faster than a Strida but it would require much more effort.

Now when I think about it, the tires on the CarryMe may have been underinflated but that was probably not the case as the LBS put more air in both wheels. It doesn't surprise me the Strida is faster and far more efficient. I tested the bike in two different LBS and the performance was the same. I really am impressed with the Strida overall, it felt effortless.

The two speed CarryMe is probably faster than the Strida but I suspect that second gear would require a lot of effort on your part.
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Old 01-23-08, 07:18 AM   #27
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I weight 165 and overweight by 15 lbs. I will lose that weight but I don't think it was an issue as the CarryMe could flex at 150 lbs. This may not be a bad thing because that flex gives a degree a comfort since it lacks any suspension. It may actually be a design feature. Overall, it's not a bad bike and I still might get it. The sample I had might have had the clamps lose or maybe the bike wasn't unfolded correctly. I doubt it but it's a possibility. The CarryMe is slower but I'm sure you could ride it faster than a Strida but it would require much more effort.

Now when I think about it, the tires on the CarryMe may have been underinflated but that was probably not the case as the LBS put more air in both wheels. It doesn't surprise me the Strida is faster and far more efficient. I tested the bike in two different LBS and the performance was the same. I really am impressed with the Strida overall, it felt effortless.

The two speed CarryMe is probably faster than the Strida but I suspect that second gear would require a lot of effort on your part.
Well, for reference, I'm 125 pounds.

As far as loose clamps, the only thing I could think of that might make the bike feel flexy is when the screw securing little "tab latch" behind the seat mast is loose. If the screw is not very tight then the tab latch has a few millimeters of play which makes the seat wiggle back and forth. Of course, if you tighten the screw too much then it's hard to push the tab opened or closed, so I added a few washers and dipped all the pieces in hot wax to reduce the play without requiring overtightening. The only other clamps are what I'll call the "headtube clamp", the QR for the telescoping seat tube, and the QR for the telescoping handlebar quill. The headtube clamp doesn't even need to be closed if you aren't dropping over curbs (or other situations where the front wheel would dip way below the rest of the frame) and, like most folders, the telescoping seat and handlebar quill QRs being too loose would just make them slip (not flex).

All I can say is that it requires way more effort to ride my Downtube at the same speed as my Carryme. In fact, despite having only a single fairly low gear, due to it's efficiency I've come to prefer the Carryme on smooth suburban roads (where wheel size doesn't matter); Even for 5+ mile rides that don't include folding. Poor city streets are, of course, different and for those I take the 20" Downtube (provided I don't plan on actually folding...the Downtube is okay for "just in case" folding, but way too inconvenient to be part of a regular routine). Although the extra gears on the Downtube are nice, the lack of efficiency compared to the Carryme is alone almost enough to make them necessary.

You're about the same height as me and you are an experience foldie/cyclist, so I doubt it could be a fit issue, but are you sure you had the seat high enough? Did you compromise an efficient pedaling position for extra knee clearance? I know the knee clearance is fairly tight.

Perhaps the Strida is just super efficient, but you're the first I've heard to say it. I'll have to try one for myself.

Last edited by makeinu; 01-23-08 at 08:48 AM.
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Old 01-23-08, 07:26 AM   #28
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makeinu,

looking forward to read your review of Strida III or 3.2 if they prefer that name.

I dearly hope the Carryme is not as hard to learn to ride as the Strida was.
The old guy in the video didn't seem to have no problem at all.

Had that been on a Strida for the first time I guess he had fallen.
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Old 01-23-08, 07:34 AM   #29
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makeinu,

looking forward to read your review of Strida III or 3.2 if they prefer that name.
Heh, well I'll have to ride one first. If I were in the market for another stroller folder then I'd surely seek out a dealer, but in the mean time I'm not sure when I'll get around to it, if ever.
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Old 01-23-08, 07:55 AM   #30
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For the first time in over a week, today the wind speed here dropped to less than 30 kph, so my wife went out on her Strida 3.2 for a 34 miles ride. Her previous longest was 29 miles on a folder group ride here in the UK.

I've tried to get her to ride a couple of different bikes but she much prefers her Strida. It's a good fit for her at 5' 7", & when she has to take a right turn in traffic (UK) she can crawl the bike along almost stationary, waiting for the right moment to ride on. I suppose it's down to the individual how well (s)he can cope with the steering.
Its the same in my family - my wife also loves using the Strida, she prefers it to full sized bikes in the household. She is also happy with it for longer rides - we did 25+ Miles at Christmas. Is this female logic telling us something ?

As for Strida Frame stiffness .. I agree with Steve .. and its pretty logical, a closed 'A' is stiffer than an open 'F' ... the stiff bars are the 1st thing I notice after not riding Strida for a bit.
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Old 01-23-08, 08:28 AM   #31
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"Basically, I'm looking for a bus/train commuter. I want a bike that I can take on a bus/lightrail, place between my legs and allow me to sit anywhere without have to go to the back. The CarryMe can do this easily but the Strida is a question mark. If you don't have to board a tight bus or tain than any folder can do.

If you have the money, the Strida is the best performer. " quote Dahon.Steve


Hi friends,

I have ridden both the Strida 3.3 (owned it for a year) & the 5 as well as the Carry Me Single Speed (own 2 of these now) and a Dual Speed version. Its really interesting and exciting to hear all the views expressed about these two very competent foldies for commuting.

Some comments about Stridas.

It is true that they roll very well on the move (better than CM) and its very upright position gives it a very comfortable and commanding ride. Still one of the most visually stylish folder $ can buy. The wobbly start in riding a Strida can be unnerving for the new rider, nothing too serious but its an inherent characteristic. The Strida 5 rides much better than the 3 due to its superior drive train and powerful disk brakes. If you have to share bikes with your wife/friends though, it is quite a hassle to adjust the seat position.

Not all but some Strida 3 suffer (mine did) from a very irritating and noisy drive train due to flexing of the plastic bottom bracket. This makes it very irritating to ride. No easy solution to this design problem but let me just stress that not everyone experiences this problem.

The gearing also seems a mite too low and its easy to run out of gears with the Strida. As a commuter, this is not an issue but you will find it a liability in longer rides.

My comments are not meant to undermine the fabulous Strida. But just like all bikes, they have their strengths and weakness and does it fit your bill?

And CMs...

I find the Carry Me the most used commuter foldie among my stable. Its compact size makes it a real breeze to handle in tight spaces in crowded buses or trains. It sits smaller between your legs and its 8.3kg weight makes carrying it so much easier than Strida. Plus it rolls just as well as the Strida.

Performance wise, the single speed CarryMe transfers your power more directly to the rear wheel as its a mini-chain compared to Strida's rubber belt (too much power it slips) system. Hence its able to ride "faster" than the Strida. My experience is 17-18 km/h cruise for Strida and 20kmh for CM if you want to be technical.

Of course the Dual Speed Schlumph drive enables the CM to really fly if you are comparing it to the Strida 5. 30kmh cruising is a possibilty! Perhaps because I weigh just under 60kg, my CM does not flex noticeably.

Newbies to the CM will also find it a bit twitchy due to its 8" tires but its not "wobbly" like the Strida. But if you are over 85kg, then the CM is a no go. Bad roads too are the CM's enemies.

At the end of the day, the debate for the best commuter (Strida vs CM) continues. Strida for its unbeatable stylishness and the Carry Me for its warm friendliness and cuteness.

Our bike club in Singapore has fans on both sides of the camp

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?...c_id=2786&v=29

ps: Forget to add that the CM is streets easier to get on/off compared to Strida - thus a better choice for the elderly/ladies/kids etc.



In today's papers...

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Old 01-23-08, 11:08 AM   #32
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Good comparison ONF - may I ask what is your weight and height ?

(this is probably a key aspect in choosing between them, unfortunately I'm too tall and heavy for Carrie-Me and other microbikes)
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Old 01-23-08, 12:22 PM   #33
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OldiesONfoldies
Quote:
Newbies to the CM will also find it a bit twitchy due to its 8" tires but its not "wobbly" like the Strida. But if you are over 85kg, then the CM is a no go.
That is what I hope. That the CM is at least easier to keep balance on.

The over 85kg is troublesome for me. I should be able to go down to that weight
so I bought a cheap Excercising bike to have in my room to make use of when the
weather is bad. It measure pulse and calories and such so if I burn enough cal my
weight will go down from 95 to 85. Btu it will take a long time.

I wonder what weight limit George Lin will set on the Carryall? That one would suite me.

Only problem would be my length. Maybe the steering stem could be heighten so my knee
don't interfere with my steering.

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Old 01-23-08, 08:11 PM   #34
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I'm just below 60kg and 5'6. But I've got a 6 footer friend who rides the CM as well. The CM is quite a sturdy design and I don't think it will fall to pieces with a rider weighing 88kg... but you know we live in such a litigacious society hence weight limits etc



6' tall Meng is both a CM as well as a Strida rider... Silas is 9 yo. He is featured in the Carry Me Pacific website.

I wish you all the best in your quest to shed the pounds - what an incentive you have. Keep exercising Weakling, and watch the calorie intake! You can do it. And when you get there, perhaps its time to change your nick May I propose "W2S" - weak to strong?

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Old 01-23-08, 08:46 PM   #35
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Looking at that photo, it seems to me the CM riders have a conventional posture while those two at the back riding the Stridas look like they are way "behind" the pedals, almost about to fall over backwards. Maybe that's one reason the Strida seems harder to ride, especially if you are short?
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Old 01-23-08, 08:55 PM   #36
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Looking at that photo, it seems to me the CM riders have a conventional posture while those two at the back riding the Stridas look like they are way "behind" the pedals, almost about to fall over backwards. Maybe that's one reason the Strida seems harder to ride, especially if you are short?
Maybe the Strida should be redesigned as a crank forward semi-recumbent.
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Old 01-23-08, 11:27 PM   #37
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Don't think its a question of being short as the seat is adjusted to the correct height of the rider. Its just the way the Strida is designed. Not as bad as the photo suggests really. I dont find it to be "semi-recumbent" though my wife does... but yeah, your legs do stretch forward a little. The CM is a more conventional riding position as Jur pointed out.

I actually like the Strida riding position. Feels "relaxed".

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Old 01-24-08, 01:33 AM   #38
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George Line seems to sit in a very relaxed position on the CM too?
FromWeak2Strong, StrongWeakling, Nah, they don't allow me to change name.
Bikeforum is strict on such. But thanks for encouraging me.

Measured from ground up what is the most high the handlebar could go?
the bike I use now have handlebar 41" or 1040 mm over ground and it is
some 22" or 560 mm from middle of saddle to middle of handlebar.

how much tighter or smaller is CarryMe?

The saddle I want some 35" to 36" or 900mm to 920 mm over ground.
Does CM provide that?
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Old 01-24-08, 02:37 PM   #39
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In today's papers...
Here is a larger version:
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Old 01-25-08, 02:56 AM   #40
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Looks to me he has a rather relaxed posture with stand up back
instead of leaning forward putting all weight on hand wrist like racer bikes.
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Old 02-04-08, 09:48 AM   #41
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That's right strida riding posture is very comfortable. Bought the carry me ds for Silas and he's handling it like a pro. The lady right at the back, well she still having problem with the strida twitchiness. I have a curv D3 and birdy Alivio. Each bike has its strong point. However in strida case, be prepare for unwelcome noise from its plastic bottom bracket housing and the saddle support as the bike reaches its half anniversary. My wife's strida is 5 months old and seldom use. Well its like what oldies on foldies said, not all has this problem, my wife's bike is the odd one. Btw thats me the one behind the yellow strida.
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Old 02-04-08, 04:33 PM   #42
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Thanks,

I found in one text on wikipedia that there are even laws on how well
a bike should handle itself.

Quote:
Legal requirements

The state of North Dakota (USA) actually has minimum and maximum

requirements on rake and trail for "manufacture, sale, and safe operation

of a motorcycle upon public highways."[10]
"4. All motorcycles, except three-wheel motorcycles, must meet the following

specifications in relationship to front wheel geometry:
MAXIMUM: Rake: 45 degrees - Trail: 14 inches [35.56 centimeters] positiveMINIMUM:
Rake: 20 degrees - Trail: 2 inches [5.08 centimeters] positive Manufacturer's
specifications must include the specific rake and trail for each motorcycle

or class of motorcycles and the terms "rake" and "trail" must be defined by the director

by rules adopted pursuant to chapter 28-32."
Ok that is motor cycle and not bicycle. But you get my drift. Too difficult to steer and

you could become a cause for accidents .The same idea about having good sight or

20-20 eyesight for to be able to get out on the roads.





So me on a Strida in North Dakota is not to think of.




I wish me could understand these terms better.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trail_%28bicycles%29



mechanical trail and rake offset and the other relevant words.

These txts are too difficult for me to grasp. I wish they had a

Technical Museum of Vehicles and there they could have a bike

that had all these parameters changeable with numbers.


Then one could test ride a bike with a given mechanical trail and

get a feel for what is needed for me to have for to be stable on it.




Unless I wait another 6 month and by a trike cause they have no trouble.

Ok could have too close to the handlebars so my knees bump into them

even on them.
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Old 02-11-08, 07:37 AM   #43
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Look at the angle of a Strida III


compared to the old Microbike that is easy to ride on.


Microbike and Carryme and many other bikes have very similar angle for the
steering while Strida due to it being a triangle is more slanted.

I wonder about the Ezybike that one is a triangle too.


How do Imake the first picture normal size. too big now.

Last edited by Weakling; 02-11-08 at 07:39 AM. Reason: Too big picture
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