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Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

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Old 02-15-08, 06:53 AM   #1
Weakling
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Strida Designer Mark Sander's story and drawings

http://www.dezeen.com/2008/02/03/int...-mark-sanders/

Here is a video interview on his thoughts that resulted in Strida.
http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?...arch&plindex=3

It is interesting to follow how he thought. Wish we could have same for his
Swivel design too.

Isn't Swivel or I F as Pacific Cycle wants to call it even more promising?

Last edited by Weakling; 02-15-08 at 02:54 PM.
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Old 02-15-08, 07:08 AM   #2
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Excellent article, cheers!

I particularly liked the term "human amplifier"
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Old 02-15-08, 01:00 PM   #3
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Fixed it for you, and am watching it now.
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Originally Posted by colorider View Post
Phobias are for irrational fears. Fear of junk ripping badgers is perfectly rational. Those things are nasty.
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Old 02-15-08, 02:48 PM   #4
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Thanks indeed. I should watch my fingers better.

I love how he thought about the need some of us have.

We want to roll it and not carry it. His Swivel design solve
this need too for 70CC wheels bikes. But will the Tram and
Bus and Train companies accept such big folders.

It is one thing that the maker like Mark Sander travel with it.
If I was a bus driver and the designer was our on a tour me
would allow it too. It is another thing if a nobody does it.

I talked to a shop selling Strida today and like me others too
have noticed that the design have compromized on how the
bike handle itself when one want to steer it while riding.

It feels very different. They tried to make it as good as
possible within the constraints of the design but as it
turns out it is not as good at on ordinary bikes costing
half the price.

My old Microbike folding bike from 1987 is much easier
to ride cause the design care about how it feels.

So I hope somebody could use the Swivel on a much smaller bike so
that one have the same way of handling itself as ordinary bikes have.
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Old 02-15-08, 06:18 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weakling View Post
........

I talked to a shop selling Strida today and like me others too
have noticed that the design have compromized on how the
bike handle itself when one want to steer it while riding.

It feels very different. They tried to make it as good as
possible within the constraints of the design but as it
turns out it is not as good at on ordinary bikes costing
half the price.
....
Do you really think we (as an example) would carry our 2 Strida bicycles around the world if we didn't find them easy to ride?

Almost any bicycle's handling will be subjective to the rider. I'd like to try your Microbike, but I've no idea what it's like to ride unless I actually try it.

As I've pointed out before, most people, except youngsters, who adapt instantly, take about 2 minutes to adjust to the steering, after which it becomes little different from most other small wheeled bicycles.

Take a look at the Strida Singapore forum for their views on Strida riding.
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Old 02-15-08, 08:13 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by 4cmd3 View Post
Excellent article, cheers!

I particularly liked the term "human amplifier"
+1 and the cartoony pictures / development video.
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Old 02-16-08, 06:54 AM   #7
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http://stridasingapore.com/forum/ind...32&topic=364.0

The Admin at Strida Singapore Baru has a post there.

Quote:
For the first Stridas (Strida 1), I followed the traditional "handling theories", about what a bike handles well-and the handling was OK but not perfect, so the myth was partially true back then.
I think he is biased. I've riding at least 7 different bikes for a long time.
I'm 65 years old. It is true that I am not as good on balance as the guys
who do tricks but if they are in the upper 90 to 100% of human ability
to keep balance and if average persons are 45 to 65% so they could be seen
as average. In the middle of what to expect. what bike designers have to
take into account to get satisfied customers.

Suppose Mark and you are in the upper average. And me way down at 35 to 40%
or something? Such is very subjective indeed but I can assure you that I have
no trouble going on a straight course on any well behaved bike. And my Microbike
have a shorter wheel base than the Strida. Shorter wheels too, shorter handlebar
so it should be even more difficult to handle. I had no problem what so ever with it.

I am surprised that Mark write as he does. I guess the human body is very good
at adjusting to different circumstance.

As you say at most 2 minutes and one have adjusted and handle the bike well.
None had come back to the shop and complained like me. So either they had
not my problem with it or are too embarrassed to admit it and keep silence about it.

Interesting what Mark says further into the citation.

Quote:
"When Mark Steedman bought over the company, he was keen to perfect the Strida. And he wanted to improve its handling, so he consulted all the 'experts' in the industry who came up with various theories about what would improve the handling - and most suggested various angles and tweaks based on traditional theories, and most were wrong!

We had a special fully adjustable test rig so we could try out the various theories and settings. This was harder than expected because of the lack of "Strida virgins" ... the human soon learns to adapt so the familiarity of the bike handling soon spoiled objectivity. In the end, we changed two key factors: 1. we added ball bearings to the main loadbearing (lower) joint 2. we used the geometry settings from the rig most preferred by 'Strida virgins'. The steering geometry of a Strida (Strida 2.5) is now quite different from the theories, but it works! For a bike with such a short wheelbase, the handling is now really good, a well balanced rider can ride hands off (don't try this at home, folks!)"
Compare that with my experience. I tested it for exactly two minutes and
that was too short. One guy I talked to say it takes weeks to learn it.

So whom should I trust? I trust all of us. We are just different!

I think we are all of us very different as individuals and that is what
Mark and Mark found out too. They had to change test drivers cause
every tester adjusted very fast to the bike and that made their
subjective reports not reliable enough.

They had to find "Strida virgins" that had no knowledge on how it
felt to ride for to get reliable report of the small changes of handling.

If I have no trouble on ordinary short wheeled bikes and have great great
difficulty on the Strida 3.2 then I trust that that bike is very different from
all ordinary bikes.
Unfortunate for me the bike shop lies 30 minutes by car and one hour by bus or train and cost a fortune to travel to for me who have no drivers
license so I could not go there and practice and I know no Strida owner
where I live so I have no chance to practice on it until I feel confident
me will be able to be safe riding it. I love the way it folds and that one
can roll it while folded. Exactly why I don't buy a Brompton.

Last edited by Weakling; 02-16-08 at 07:16 AM.
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Old 02-16-08, 12:46 PM   #8
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Weakling,

I'm wondering why you take every opportunity in your posts here and at other forums to slam the Strida as being unrideable. I, cyclistjohn and tens of thousands of others actually ride Stridas and you don't. Yet based on your two-minute ride experience inside a bike shop, you have written off the Strida as a faulty design. You apparently think every prospective buyer should be warned as such. Yes, the Strida has initially different handling characteristics but it is not unrideable. In fact, I and many others find it very easy to maneuver, which is a big benefit in urban situations. I'm sure there are other critics like you that have passed on the Strida over the issue of ride handling but they don't present their personal views as universal truth. Every bike has its peculiarities and so, apparently, does every rider.

So, please stop whining about the Strida. WE GET IT ALREADY, OKAY? It is not suitable for tall, heavy-set, 65-year-old Swedish men with balance issues. Please move on.
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Old 02-16-08, 07:55 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by chainstrainer View Post
Weakling, I'm wondering why you take every opportunity in your posts here and at other forums to slam the Strida as being unrideable. I, cyclistjohn and tens of thousands of others actually ride Stridas and you don't. Yet based on your two-minute ride experience inside a bike shop, you have written off the Strida as a faulty design. You apparently think every prospective buyer should be warned as such. Yes, the Strida has initially different handling characteristics but it is not unrideable. In fact, I and many others find it very easy to maneuver, which is a big benefit in urban situations. I'm sure there are other critics like you that have passed on the Strida over the issue of ride handling but they don't present their personal views as universal truth. Every bike has its peculiarities and so, apparently, does every rider.

So, please stop whining about the Strida. WE GET IT ALREADY, OKAY? It is not suitable for tall, heavy-set, 65-year-old Swedish men with balance issues. Please move on.
well said +1
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Old 02-18-08, 07:45 AM   #10
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well said +1
Yes, I agree. Weakling, I just don't understand why you are so disappointed with Strida. Everyone has assured you that if you want to ride it, you will learn quickly. Doesn't Strida still offer a 30-day money-back no-questions-asked guarantee? If you don't want to ride it, that's fine too.
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Old 02-18-08, 06:59 PM   #11
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If you're too tall for the Strida, then you better think about getting a Brompton. There's an individual on YouTube who's dragging a Brompton very effectively on a smooth surface. Rolling the bike that way probably makes a lot of noise but it can be done.
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Old 02-24-08, 11:53 PM   #12
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I like the Strida except my bike had a particular clonking sound when pedaling. My 3.3 Strida has a plastic crank housing that creaks upon load and its very irritating. Found out that a friend with a 3.3 also has the same problem. The distributor unfortunately is unable to rectify the problem and I have sold it since. Quite disappointed really.

I'm sure this is not a problem that affects every Strida but its becoming a well known quirk like Brompton's mushy front brakes among my circle of foldie riders. So something for you to consider when getting a Strida. Test and make sure yours is silent before taking delivery!

Its still a very attractive bike - pity about the noise.

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Old 02-25-08, 01:56 PM   #13
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We finally became a 2 Strida household ! My wife has virtually hijacked my trusty old Strida3, she now uses it every day for work .. and its become her preferred weekend leisure ride. So after years procrastinating and avoiding becoming a his 'n hers mupet, I've got a new Strida5 (as in the article, another 'human amplifier'). Its hard to compare them as the 3 is now 4 years old and has had a tough life. The Strida5 seems to be the same weight, and feels generally stiffer (but that could be due to being newer). The disc brakes are a revelation .. almost too good (like 'over the bars' good if not expecting them !!). Generally it also seems to have slightly lower rolling resistance .. probably due to the narrower, and higher pressure tyres (on the smart new rims - which use an ultra-narrow spoke pattern). It still uses a pin to align the seat .. which as i am tall ends up at the bottom of the plastic seat mounting, not a good feature - this means the clamps have to be tight to avoid it moving side to side. The otherwise excellent supplied multi key is a bit small for this. Build quality seems excellent, overall I am very impressed - more so than I expected to be ... I dont want to get it dirty

Unlike poster above my wife's Strida3 has no squeaks from the plastic .. (but the belt does squeak sometimes when its dry and its rubber edges rub against the big pulley).

I must say I like the unique upright strida riding position. I spend far too long in front of a PC and my back suffers .. unlike our other bikes, (brompton L3, 700c road bikes and various mountain bikes) the Strida's upright riding position is an instant cure for this.
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Old 02-25-08, 08:35 PM   #14
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I've test rode the 5 and its a diff animal than the 3 in terms of rolling efficiency (better tires as pointed out), better braking and MOST of all, much better transmission feel due to its rear free wheel hub like a "normal" bike.

Congrats Simple Simon!

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Old 02-26-08, 11:50 AM   #15
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The Strida 5.0 has an improved aluminum crank housing - no more squeaky plastic. The metal rims, higher pressure tires and rear hub freewheel all add up to more efficient speed, especially when coasting. The modulation of the mechanical disc brakes add to the feeling of control.
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Old 02-26-08, 05:16 PM   #16
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Are there any competitors to Strida with similar designs for less $$ ?
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Old 02-26-08, 08:12 PM   #17
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There are several companies producing worthy folding bikes but the Strida design is truly unique, if not ideal for everyone. There are designs that fold smaller, fold as quick or quicker, have multiple gears, larger wheels, more full-size ride feel, etc., but none of those designs are more simple and elegant in concept or execution for the short-distance, public-transit-commuting bike rider that the Strida was developed for. I've read of a cheap knock-off (from China? If so, how ironic that the real Strida is made in Taiwan!) but there are no apples-to-apples competitor that I'm aware of. The $799.00 retail price of the Strida 5.0 ($499.00 for the model 3.2) is not really outrageously expensive for the high quality and innovative design it buys. Having said that, there are better deals out there if you're not uncomfortable about on-line shopping.
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Old 03-05-08, 10:24 AM   #18
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Are there any competitors to Strida with similar designs for less $$ ?
If you are in the US you can get the Strida 5 for $699 (plus free shipping) from strida.ca instead of $799 from strida.us. Also, fredflare.com is now selling the Strida 5 and it's not unusual for them to occasionally offer 25% off coupons.

As far as competitors go, there's the Carryme from Pacific Cycles which, although designed for a similar purpose, is not a similar design. The MSRP on the Carryme is $499 just like the Strida 3. However, you may be able to negotiate a lower price (I was).

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Old 03-05-08, 02:03 PM   #19
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Strida Forums

http://www.stridaforum.com/forum/

This is a relatively new forum with some information that may be of interest to Strida owners. The "News" and "Where to buy" links are a little out of date but the user forums have photos, tech tips, accessories, web links etc., not found easily from other sites. Many members I believe are predominantly from asian countries like Singapore, Korea and Taiwan where the Strida is more prevalent. The site itself is in English even if some of the users links are not.
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