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  1. #1
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    Dahon speed 8, MU p8

    Hello, new to the site and to folders. I've done as much research as my brain is on overload. I have decided on a Dahon, probobly the 2008 Speed 8. Why? I think it suits me and the type of riding/training I do. My questions, concerns are the components. I havent kept up with the pro's and cons of the components in years. I want a bike that had decent components that will last. When I went to the local bike shop that will be doing my ordering, the salesman/mechanic wasnt that impressed with some of the components, or he just wasnt sure about some things. I dont expect Lance spec's, but I expect the components to perform. Any suggestions, or recomendations.

    Thks
    Lanny

  2. #2
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    I love my 2008 Speed P8. Pros: a smooth ride thanks to the Big Apples, and a really solid feel. I have absolutely no play (yet, knock on wood) in the headset. The components are a step up compared to my other folders (a Downtube and a Dahon Boardwalk 7) but still need to see how they do over time. It looks really good too, the red is not as obnoxious as it looks in photos online. Cons: weight (28 pounds and I think Dahon rounded their specs down, it feels heavier) and the built in pump in the seatpost. It's a good pump and a nice idea, but it has a tendency to go loose, which is really bad. There are numerous fixes for this on the Dahon forums though.

  3. #3
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    Folderster,
    Thks, It is good to hear positive things.

  4. #4
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    I wouldn't say I'm impressed by the components. Most of them are made by Dahon; "Kinetix" is a "house brand" of Dahon. They should be OK if you ride less than 100 miles a week on a regular basis, though.

    An ancillary question is whether they can be upgraded if they break. Brakes? Very likely. Hubs? Maybe, but they are highly unlikely to break. Rear derailleur? I'm not sure, definitely one to check. Handlepost? No, you'd have to find another one (and they change that part every few years).

    If you can replace the rear derailleur in the unlikely event that it breaks or wears out, then I think the component quality isn't much of an issue.

  5. #5
    Car free since 1995 pm124's Avatar
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    In my opinion, Dahon's strongest point is the components. Both of those bikes have great components--upper mid-range. They should last a long time. (SRAM X7 is probably as good or better than Shimano 105/XT level parts.) The parts to worry about are the stem and hinge.

    Regarding the Kinetix house brand, the components seem light and well designed, but I have no idea how they wear. Anyway, it's a good idea to have a shorter front axle on a small wheeled bike.

  6. #6
    SWS: Small Wheel Syndrome kb5ql's Avatar
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    Dahon's make for a great first folder. The component spec is fine. The folding stem was the only real dealbreaker for me. It gets loose after a few years and you can't stand and mash on it. The steel frame is heavy, but it's built like a tank.

    Not sure about the newer ones, but make sure you get the spoke tension checked out. I broke a lot of spokes in the rear b/c of the lousy machine built wheels.

    What's great about most folders is that the resale value isn't as bad as a standard bike. I definitely think you're making the right choice looking at the P8.

    Also, it might help us out to know how you're planning on using the folder. (e.g. multi-modal commuting, putting it in the trunk, etc.)

  7. #7
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    My use for the folder is to and from gym and general riding around the neighborhood. 99% of my riding will be on area roads or bike path, but with a few excersions off the beaten path, the area around the lake is pretty beat up road combined with some gravel. My main concern is not to fold daily, but I like the folding aspect so I can travel with the bike by just putting it in the back of the Jeep. How well are the internal hub bikes, I do like the concept, but I like the Dahon Speed and that is not an internal hub. I've considered Downtube, but I dont like the idea that I can't order through the LBS.

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    I have a 2007 MUP8. I ride recumbents 90% of the time so I only have 700 miles on the Dahon so far. The components seem fine, nothing special but more than serviceable. The 2008 MUP8 hasa Neos derailleur rather than the SRAM 7 on the 2007 (I have a Sram 7 level derailluer on another bike and it is still goiing strong after 11,000 miles.) I don't like the Sram 3.0 shfiter but was able to buy a Sram 7 level, 8 speed shifter replacement on sale from an internet retailer for $8.00. I've been pleased with the Dahon and it fits my needs. I haven't had any component failures so far and have only done minor modifications (shortened the handlebar by 3", replaced the saddle with a cheap triple sprung mexican leather saddle, and replaced the handlebar grips with Ergon grips).

  9. #9
    New usename ThorUSA brakemeister's Avatar
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    BAccia
    I quote : They should be OK if you ride less than 100 miles a week on a regular basis, though. quote stop

    wonder where that comes from all of the sudden ?
    Its a change to the usual properiaty stuff which you dont seem to like ..... ( 8 different seatposts arent enough )

    There are hundred, maybe thousands of folks who use their Dahon every day to go to work in all kinds of misearble weather limiting their ridden miles would seriously put a dent in their lifestyle ....

    Thor

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    I agree with Thor, I wouldn't worry about the durability of the Speed or MU P8. My fiance & I have a Speed P8 & a MU XL. I've been commuting regulary on the P8. It is a 30 mile round trip, plus weekend fast & leisure rides. The wheels have been perfect. Far better than the machine built 700c wheels I have purchased. Wasn't the front hub designed by American Classic? I have an 07 model with the SRAM rear derailleur. The SRAM 3.0 shifter & derailleur's shifting is excellent. I can't personally speak for the NEOS, but you can swap out rather cheaply if you don't like it. I like both the Big Apples (Speed) & the Marathon (MU) tires. The Marathons are definitely faster but not as cushy.

    I've been riding the MU XL with the Shimano internal 8 speed hub recently. I see Thor has some 2007 MU XL's on his website. It is truly an excellent commuting bike. I really like the generator hub, and it comes with rack, fenders, & of course lights.

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    I really appreciate all the advice, comments and so forth. I really do not know which bike to choose. It really bites not being able to put your hands on one before buying. With all of the replies, I now want to add a internal hub bike in the mix. Any suggestions or comments on which one to consider?

    Thanks
    Lanny

  12. #12
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by pm124 View Post
    In my opinion, Dahon's strongest point is the components. Both of those bikes have great components--upper mid-range.
    Having assembled about 3000 of these bikes. You have no idea how funny this statement is.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  13. #13
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    What is a generator hub?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ontopcop View Post
    What is a generator hub?
    Generates electricity from the wheel to run lights.

  15. #15
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    And Dahons have theses?

  16. #16
    SWS: Small Wheel Syndrome kb5ql's Avatar
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    EDIT: UGH. I just realized you guys were talking about generator hubs/dynamos for the front lighting system. oh well. You can read about hub gear below since I spent the time writing it...

    This is what they're referring to:
    http://www.dahon.com/components/xl/dynamo.htm

    I retrofitted my Dahon w/ a Nexus 8-speed hub. It was OK. Here are some pros and cons with hub gears:

    PROS:
    1. No Friggin' chain drop!!!
    - the problem w/ 8-speed folders is they have a tendency to have the chain fly off if you shift too quickly to your high-gear. There are some kludgy solutions to this problem, but it happens. Hub gear has a single chain line and will not have this problem. This is actually the number one reason for getting my hub on the bike about 1 year after owning it.

    2. Excellent for commuting/foul weather, etc.
    - Since you don't really have to adjust the hub gear (like a rear derailleur at times), it is really convenient. Also, there's one thing a hub gear can do that's really neat if you're a commuter, you can go from say, 5th gear and twist the handle all the way to first while you're at a light and it won't complain. Neat if you have a lot of starts and stops in your commute.

    CONS:
    1. HEAVY HEAVY HEAVY. The bike is heavy enough as it is. If you add a hub gear, it adds at least another pound. Even worse, it SEEMS heavier b/c all the weight is now in the rear. It makes toting it around seem touger.

    2. A little tricky to fix flats.
    - you will now have to carry around a wrench in your saddle bag if/when you need to remove the tire to fix your flat. Also, the cable release to the hub is sometimes tricky to remove when doing this.

    I would try and ride a bike with hub hears (a cruiser bike would be a good start) and see if you like the characteristics.
    Last edited by kb5ql; 04-09-08 at 01:39 AM.

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