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  1. #1
    basia
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    Any opinions on Dahon Mu P24?

    I'm considering buying a Dahon Mu P24 to use for light touring and longer rides in hilly terrain. Also considering the Dahon Speed TR '08 (24 speed). Potential advantages of the Mu P24 over the Speed TR are more compact packing (due to handlebars), lighter frame, and lower price. Disadvantages might be the comfort of an aluminum frame on longer rides and strength for carrying panniers with some weight (note: I don't intend on doing hard touring on this). Any thoughts/opinions would be much appreciated!

  2. #2
    Lanky Lass East Hill's Avatar
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    Hello basia, I'm going to move this to the Folding Bike forum...

    Welcome to BF, and feel free to PM me with any questions !

    East Hill

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    The MU's aluminum frame seems to be just as comfortable as the steel frame on the Speed. We have a MU XL & Speed P8. Both ride excellent, but I think I would prefer the MU frame. It feels very solid as well. I have not toured on it, but I have carried a pretty heavy weight in the rack trunk with no issues.

  4. #4
    basia
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    Thanks for the info!

  5. #5
    Senior Member mrbrown's Avatar
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    I have one and love it. Ride is a little harsh, but the bike is strong and sturdy. I have a touring rack mounted on it, and it can take panniers, but I ride with a simpler trunk bag (to carry my work clothes).



    http://flickr.com/photos/mr-brown/23...7604040308100/

    I believe the TR has the additional bits like the Thudbuster seatpost and the dynamo and Hella lights.
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  6. #6
    basia
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    MrBrown, thanks for sharing the picture. Wondering if you could comment more on the "harsh" ride. Have you done any longer rides on it (e.g., more than 50K)?

  7. #7
    Senior Member mrbrown's Avatar
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    Yes I have ridden more than 50km on this fella with no problems. I do the longer rides on weekends and I ride about 14km daily for work. I have also taken it onto the mass rapid transit for mixed mode travel. All fine.

    I am perhaps a little spoiled by the Big Apple tires on my Dahon Curve. And prior to owning this P24, I was riding a Vitesse with Big Apples on it. So I am a little partial to the comfort from those Big Apples.

    It is still a good ride, mind you. The Marathon Racers are good and fast tires. I am just wondering if I should sacrifice the weight for the comfort (Big Apples weigh more than the Marathon Racers).

    I highly recommend the P24, it is a very hardworking bike with decent components for the money. I've only added a few extras to it so far (like a Rido saddle and carbon seatpost) because the stock stuff is so decent. I have almost stopped riding my full sized bike in favour of it simply because it is such a versatile all-rounder. The only time I switch to the 16-inch Curve is when I want a smaller bike to take on crowded trains, and when I am not riding long distances.
    Last edited by mrbrown; 05-10-08 at 11:39 AM.
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  8. #8
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    I've got a MU P24, also. It's great. I've had it less than two months. Unfortunately, I hurt my back, recently, and haven't been able to ride it too much. A couple of weeks ago, though, I rode it on a Friday night for 11.2 miles (says my car GPS unit that I had stowed away in my waist pack) and the following day for about 10 miles. Time and body permitting, I could easily ride it 30+ miles. I've recently moved out of my parent's house and into an apartment (with wife and others), which is why I bought the folder (lack of space). My past two bikes are mountain bikes, which I've ridden for several thousand miles, and I feel equally comfortable on my Dahon. It seems to be just as fast as the mountain bike, and I feel, pretty much, like I'm riding the same type of bike. I don't find the tires to give an uncomfortable ride, at all, but I've been doing all smooth street riding. I had the hardest time deciding between the Speed P8 and Mu P24. I tried them both out in the long bumpy alley in back of the bike shop. There, I really noticed a difference in the ride provided by the Marathon Racers versus the Big Apples. The Big Apples provided a ride that felt exactly like a mountain bike and the Racers were pretty rough back in that alley (it was really bumpy). I knew that I'd be doing mostly street riding, though, and went with the P24 for the higher high gears. I'm happy with my decision. The bike really flies! As for the panniers, they're over the tires, not creating strain on the folding hinge, so you should feel confident that you'd be able to load them to the brim without incident.

  9. #9
    basia
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    Hi MrBrown, ZoneRanger & CrimsonEclipse,
    Thanks for all your information. After speaking with J at Gaerlan Custom Cycles in California (who seems very knowledgeable about Dahons in particular and touring on folders in general), I've decided to purchase the Mu P24 and get a spare rear wheel without the dual drive. I was thinking of getting the P8 instead, because the wheel has quick release and is easier to take on and off than the dual drive train wheel on the P24, but after considering the price differential, and the fact that I might want the 24 gears in the future, I decided to do it this way. J advised that the dual drive wheel is fragile for air travel, and difficult to take the wheel on and off, so I'm going to leave the dual drive wheel at home for my first overseas trip with the Dahon. He's going to change out the front ring for me to allow lower gearing for climbing hills. I plan to get front and rear racks, with a trunk bag and possibly panniers on the front (J thinks that they shouldn't be a problem, especially if not loaded too heavily. Standing on the bike while climbing is the real problem for the headset).

    I'll let you know how it all goes! Thanks again.

    Basia

  10. #10
    basia
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    CrimsonEclipse,
    Thanks for the tips. Apparently there is a way to put a front derailleur on, using a special clamp which is available in Taiwan but not yet in the US.
    Basia

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by basia View Post
    CrimsonEclipse,
    Thanks for the tips. Apparently there is a way to put a front derailleur on, using a special clamp which is available in Taiwan but not yet in the US.
    Basia
    Thor (thorusa.com) was looking to bring some to the shores of North America...
    obviously no timeline, but there is definitely a real interest in them.
    cheers

  12. #12
    Senior Member Northwestrider's Avatar
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    I've had my Mu P24 for only a month or so, but have had it on 6 flights already and so far ( knock on wood) have had no problems with it's dual drive. At the suggestion of my LBS, before a flight I remove the quick release at the right end of the hub as well as the long pin that the QR slides over. I do not know what the correct term for the QR is, but it has a small black pin. Just depress the pin and it should slide off. Then as I have said, unscrew the long pin that is installed finger tight and secure the pin to something so it is not lost. I also at the suggestion of my LBS remove the deraillieur to protect it as well. I have the bike inside the Dahon semi hard case. I am not worried about the bike, as I feel it secure this way. And by the way the above process of removing the QR and deraillieur is five minutes, max. I hope this helps

  13. #13
    Supreme Commander of CATO
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    So it's been about another month since someone posted in this thread. MU P24 owners, how are things going with your bicycles since you last posted here? Any of you in the Washington, DC area that can recommend an LBS to order Dahons from?

  14. #14
    Senior Member mrbrown's Avatar
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    Still loving the P24. I am getting used to the bike now, and feel the harshness less. It is a very quick bike to ride. I ride it almost every day now, leaving the other bikes for weekends. My buddy Ryan just bought a white one and enjoys it too. His model has separate shifters, the Dualdrive shifter are on the left handle and the 8-speed cassette shifter on the right. Mine are combined into one shifter on the right. White is such a cool colour for a P24.

    I like that idea, Basia, having a second wheel without the Dual Drive, effectively making it a P8.

    I am going to be in the Honolulu, Youngstown Ohio, and Washington DC later this year for a conference, over a 2 week period, and I was thinking of how to take my P24 with me for some short touring. Your post has given me some ideas. I shall speak to my LBS about the cost of doing up another rear wheel for travel. Thanks for that.

    What do you do about the Dualdrive shifter and cables?
    Last edited by mrbrown; 06-13-08 at 05:00 AM.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member KoYak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taser View Post
    So it's been about another month since someone posted in this thread. MU P24 owners, how are things going with your bicycles since you last posted here? Any of you in the Washington, DC area that can recommend an LBS to order Dahons from?
    Bikes @ Vienna in Vienna, VA is a Great little shop that carries a good supply of Dahons.

  16. #16
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    I bought a MU P24 about a month ago. It's my first folder! I enjoy it very much. It's very fast, very sturdy, but I find it a bit heavy and big (like most Dahons). The P24 weighs 27.5 pounds without any optional rack (which I don't have).

    So I have ordered a custom light-weight Brompton, which I tried at our local dealer and found the ride very enjoyable! I much prefer the compactness of the Brompton.

    I will probably keep the MU for my girlfriend or for longer, hilly rides.

  17. #17
    basia
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    feedback on mu p24

    Sorry about the long lapse- I said I would follow up. Here's a long, detailed one to make up for it! I did buy a spare rear wheel and had the front ring changed out to allow lower gears without the dual drive. But-- I ran out of time before I left home and didn't have a chance to try out the single drive rear wheel, so I wound up traveling with the dual drive (not so good an outcome as I had hoped- read on). For packing, I removed both wheels, wrapped in cardboard and bubble wrap and put them into one bag with my clothes for extra padding, and then put the frame into another bag, again wrapped in bubble wrap and clothes and then cardboard (I hate bubble wrap for enviro reasons but I reuse the heck out of it, and now you can get what they call "enviro-wrap" at the U-Haul stores in the US, which supposedly is made with recycled plastic and is nice and thick). I didn't travel with a hard suitcase because I wanted to be able to fold up my bags. For the frame, I bought a large sturdy Cordura nylon duffle bag at the Army surplus store for around $45 USD. The brand is "Camp Inn". Very good purchase. Then I put strong nylon straps (the kind we use for rafting) around the whole thing to make it more compact and sturdy. No problems there. I wasn't charged for an oversize bag, though it was a tad over-sized (British Airways). For the wheels I bought a backpack style bag from Downtube which is made for their bikes. The straps tore away from the bag even though I didn't have a whole bike in there, only the wheels and some clothes! My husband also bought one and had the same problem. The stitching on the straps is the problem.
    Anyway, when I got to my destination I found little slips of paper from the US authorities saying they had searched my bags. So this was before the bags were loaded onto the plane... The frame bag was fine but the contents of the wheel bag had been re-arranged, with the consequence that the wheels weren't properly padded and the little shifting rod that goes into the rear hub (for the dual drive) was broken. It looks like a pin and the head can be screwed on- the head was sheared off and the rod bent. It's called a "shifting rod"- maybe that's what NorthwestRider was referring to in his/her post on May 17, it's not called a Quick Release though. There's the black plastic box that slides onto it which is called a "Clickbox" and then the Dual Drive SRAM shifting rod is the little pin-like thing that the Clickbox connects with. I'm trying to get a replacement here in the UK. It probably wouldn't be too hard in a larger city but I'm in Bangor, Wales. In retrospect, it might have been fine had I simply unscrewed that piece prior to travel. I'm not sure. I've been told that if we can extract the rod then we can simply screw in a new one. The part itself is quite inexpensive, and tiny, so I would definitely recommend having one or two spares. My bike dealer says he shipped the bike with a spare, but there was some miscommunication and I wasn't aware of it.
    I've been riding the bike without use of the dual drive- so I have only the 8 gears. Luckily I have the low gears (it's hilly here in North Wales). The downside is that I don't have higher gears for downhill and flat terrain, so it's a bit slow going. I'm very glad I got the Big Apple tires because there is a lot of rough terrain (gravel bike paths). So far the bike is great, even without all those extra gears.
    As far as shifting goes, it's pretty smooth most of the time (the 8-speed cassette shifter on the right, that is). I rode the bike a bit in Seattle before my trip, with the dual drive, and I found the shifting great with all the hills.
    Overall I would definitely recommend the bike, though I have no other folders to compare it to. I'm sure it is heavier than a Brompton, but doesn't the Brompton have smaller wheels? My hubby bought a Bike Friday New World Tourist with 16 gears so we'll be able to compare once I get my dual drive fixed and he travels here this week. The one thing I don't like about the Dahon front rack is that you have to remove it to get the front wheel off, because the rack blocks the brakes so you can't release them. The BF front rack is better in that regard.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
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    About frame material and ride quality....for anything other than racing conditions where you seek to eke out the last 1% of performance, tune your ride quality with tire selection and not frame material choice. The tires you run and the PSI you run them at will after ride quality far more than the type of material used to construct the frame. You can also add a Thudbuster (seatpost suspension) to help absorb bumps.

    Frame material is more relevant in considering the longevity of the frame with the type of riding that you do. If you jump curbs, trees, logs (none of which you should be doing on a folder), then steel is probably a better choice for you. Under hard riding conditions, aluminium frames seem to last about 10 years. Cracks to alu. cannot be easily repaired whereas steel can simply be welded back.

    The benefits of alu. is the lighter weight. But the frame tends to be thick to compensate for the relatively weaker strength of aluminium when sized identically with steel frames. So that becomes a matter for aesthetics.

  19. #19
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    Wish there were color choices in the States.

  20. #20
    basia
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    mu p24 shifting rod

    Got the SRAM dual drive shifting rod today and the bike is now back to normal Luckily, an easy fix. But I had to wait several days for the part. They're so tiny and inexpensive, it's worth it to have a couple of spares.

    I agree with puppypilgrim about the tires- nice thick tires (like Big Apples) that are not fully inflated soften the ride. Highly desirable when you're traveling and not sure what kinds of surfaces you'll encounter.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by basia View Post
    My hubby bought a Bike Friday New World Tourist with 16 gears so we'll be able to compare once I get my dual drive fixed and he travels here this week. The one thing I don't like about the Dahon front rack is that you have to remove it to get the front wheel off, because the rack blocks the brakes so you can't release them. The BF front rack is better in that regard.
    How does the NWT compare to the Mu P24? I'm considering both and would love to hear from someone with both!

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