Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    best lock for dahon curve d3

    Greetings Everyone

    I haven't owned a bike since I was a kid, but I have ordered a dahon curve d3 and I need advice on a good lock. I imagine myself riding to the beach or to a cafe and having to lock my bike for maybe 1-2 hours...as of now, I don't intend on locking it for anymore time than that. What are some good options for me and how much can I expect to pay? Now that I think about it, size is an issue also...I mean I don't want to be riding around and having to carry some HUGE lock with me....I'd like something simple but reliable, especially considering the short time span I think I'll be locking my bike. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member old_school_dave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    The foothills of California
    My Bikes
    2008 Vitesse D7HG, 2007 Curve D3
    Posts
    65
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not the definitive person to ask, but my impression is it would be hard to cover all the bases you want. A lot of it depends on how crime-worthy the place is that you would be leaving it. For instance, beaches seem like a likely place to lose a bike.

    A good U-lock is the thing to lock the frame and one wheel to a fixed object. Again, the more secure the lock, the heavier it would be, up to the Krypto NY locks which are very heavy. Then you can look at running a chain and lock (or a cable lock if you don't mind trading some security for a lighter lock) for the other wheel. The general idea is that the kinds of tools that could break a U-lock are different than the ones that cut chains/cables.

    As a new owner of a Dahon who's brought up this subject here, I am convinced more and more that the only really safe solution is to use the bike's folding capabilities and have the bike with you all the time. The more I think about it, the more it looks like no lock provides total security against theft. It seems more of a visual deterent to the casual opportunist.

  3. #3
    Senior Member snafu21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Mangroves, UK
    My Bikes
    None.
    Posts
    1,896
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can undo the combination cable lock I bought for my Dahon in the dark by touch alone. I have a couple of large fat chain locks from my motorcycle. Where possible, take the bike with you, already.
    - every mile of road has two miles of ditch -

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    London
    My Bikes
    2011 Jetstream P11 Alfine
    Posts
    858
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To a bike thief 1- 2 hours isn't a short time - is a life time !

    As a minimum you need two different types of lock, in that they require two different methods to break them. forget 99% of cable locks, they can be cut in milliseconds with minimal throw away equipment. A substantial chain, in a shroud for paint protection, with the best padlock you can afford, to lock the frame to rack, post, whatever. Back this up with a D lock, New York for preference, and as tight a fit as possible, this also to secure the frame, then, and only then, maybe a cable to secure the saddle, wheels etc. Yes, its a lot to hump around, but its either that, or get some really good insurance.

  5. #5
    New usename ThorUSA brakemeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Southern Illinois USA
    Posts
    2,469
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    yes there is simply no truly safe lock , if somebody wants to steal it, it will be gone.... It is in my opinion however counterproductive to schlepp 30 pounds of chain and padlocks around with you ... Most people have the idea to do that, buy all the locks and than never take them.... leaving the bike completly unlocked... It is better to have a small good quaility cable with a decent but not oversized lock ..with you and use it, than plan to use Fort Knox security and than not have it with you ...

    its no dterrent for a pro bike thief, but will keep the bike safe from 90% of drug addicts / petty thiefs

    thor

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    My Bikes
    Too many....................
    Posts
    3,070
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    tie a pitbull or a doberman to it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member mrbrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Singapore
    My Bikes
    Upgraded Scott Sub 20 in silver; Specialized Hardrock Comp Disc 2006 in limited edition Army green; Dahon Curve D3 foldable in white; Dahon MU P24 in blue.
    Posts
    342
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i used to pack u-locks and such to secure my bikes then to end this, I got a Dahon Curve so I never let my bike out of sight anymore. The best lock is a Bike You Can Take With You. Haha.
    Mercy overtakes
    even when you push fifty
    pedaling His paths


    My blog | My podcasts | My Flickr | My Rides

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    New York
    My Bikes
    Brompton
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mrbrown View Post
    i used to pack u-locks and such to secure my bikes then to end this, I got a Dahon Curve so I never let my bike out of sight anymore. The best lock is a Bike You Can Take With You. Haha.
    Total agreement. I've had a Brompton for a month and no lock-- it is always with me either under a table in a restaurant or rolling on it's rear rack in a store as a shopping cart. I have a regular bike and never use it in New York as it has too many things to lock up--quick release wheels etc. It's also getting much much tougher to find a spot to park a bike in the city as the racks are full up and bike sales are booming.

  9. #9
    jur
    jur is online now
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    6,158
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes, rather get a slip cover or Ikea bag and take it with you. I have been surprised how little resistance I get. The only place where I gave up was at the courts during jury duty. They wouldn't even let me bring in my bike tool.

    That said, there are mini versions of the D locks.

    I stopped using my D lock in favour of a padlock with one of those long sliding shackles. I put the shackle through the back wheel enclosing both chainstays or seatstays, and slide the lock body on. Then one of those lock cables is included looped around a pole.

    This strategy is not as secure as a D lock, but it immobilises the bike, protects the expensive back wheel, and ties it to a structure. A very light to carry solution which I use for light security situations like quickly popping into some shops. It would be easy to cut the cable but you'd still either need a good bolt cutter to free the bike or would need to carry it away. Plus the lock is mostly inaccessible to reach with bolt cutters, only the curved portion is available for cutting. Plus it's hardened steel.
    Last edited by jur; 07-18-08 at 05:15 PM.
    My folding bike photo essays www.dekter.net/

  10. #10
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,076
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by poboxnyc View Post
    Total agreement. I've had a Brompton for a month and no lock-- it is always with me either under a table in a restaurant or rolling on it's rear rack in a store as a shopping cart. I have a regular bike and never use it in New York as it has too many things to lock up--quick release wheels etc. It's also getting much much tougher to find a spot to park a bike in the city as the racks are full up and bike sales are booming.

    I agree. My own folders are always with me when I am out and about with one of them. Racks, signposts, poles, and the like are poor subsitutes for the folding bike's unique means of security. And do think about it. If bike sales are booming (a good thing), then the demand for shady, questionable sales of fenced or stolen bikes (not a good thing) probably will increase too. That means any bike-no matter what style it is or how old-will become more valuable to the thief. And the folding bike will reign "theft resistant" over all.

  11. #11
    Senior Member neilfein's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Highland Park, NJ, USA
    My Bikes
    "Hildy", a Novara Randonee touring bike; a 16-speed Bike Friday Tikit; Dahon Curve D3 folding bike; a green around-town cruiser; and a Specialized Stumpjumper frame-based built-up MTB.
    Posts
    3,778
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, the lock kind of defeats the purpose of the folding bike, but I can see how you wouldn't want to roll it around for hours. The U-locks are more secure, but the cable locks are lighter, you'll have to make that call based on the security of the area.

    Since the D3 frame is a straight tube, the only place on the bike to hook a lock onto is the stay that leads to the bottom bracket. It's accessible to a U-lock when you fold the bike.

    Since the seatpost is huge (and pretty heavt, with the integrated pump) taking the saddle along isn't really an option. I'd suggest looping a cable lock through the saddle rails.
    Tour Journals, Blog, ride pix

    I'm in the celtic folk fusion band Baroque and Hungry. "Mended", our new full-length studio album, is now available for download.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the responses...and wow you guys sure know a lot about biking. I do like the idea of just folding the bike and taking it with me, but everytime you fold it, isn't it a hassle to have to find the right height for the seat and handlebars? Also, doesn't always folding/unfolding create unecessary wear and tear on the bike, or am I just overthinking things?

    I am still considering a lock, but definitely not a U-lock.....more likely, the cable lock, as, if I'm correct, I can just wrap it around my seatpost?

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    My Bikes
    Too many....................
    Posts
    3,070
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just put a mark where you want the seat post height and handlebars positioned. Keep the hinge lubed and should give you many years of service.

  14. #14
    Senior Member snafu21's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Mangroves, UK
    My Bikes
    None.
    Posts
    1,896
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "isn't it a hassle to have to find the right height for the seat and handlebars"

    Sharpies are your friends...
    - every mile of road has two miles of ditch -

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh yeah and how do I know the correct height for the handlebars and seat post?.........I like to sit up on my bike, rather than to lean forward....is it just a matter of trial and error? But even with the trial and error, is there some standard that I should be looking at, ie, your arms should be a certain degree in front of you, etc?

  16. #16
    Senior Member neilfein's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Highland Park, NJ, USA
    My Bikes
    "Hildy", a Novara Randonee touring bike; a 16-speed Bike Friday Tikit; Dahon Curve D3 folding bike; a green around-town cruiser; and a Specialized Stumpjumper frame-based built-up MTB.
    Posts
    3,778
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Adjust the bike so it's comfortable. The Dahons are mostly designed to be ridden in a semi-upright position. I find that keeping the bars a shade aove saddle height works for me, but all that depends on how you're proportioned.

    The hardest part of getting a folder to fit you isn't finding the right heights, but learning to unfold it to the perfect proportions. Stopping to adjust the seat is a pain in the saddle.
    Tour Journals, Blog, ride pix

    I'm in the celtic folk fusion band Baroque and Hungry. "Mended", our new full-length studio album, is now available for download.

  17. #17
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been commuting to work with the Curve SL for about 8 months now, I was able to keep it under my desk for the first few months until the head concierge spotted me one day and informed me that "bikes of any type are not allowed in the elevators". Since that time I've had to lock up my bike for 8-10 hours a day. Make no mistake, the Curve is definitely more of a hassle to lock up than a regular bike. Here's what works for me:

    1) I use a Kryptonite Evolution Standard size U-lock to lock the frame. I normally prefer to use the Mini Evolution for my mountain and track bikes to lessen the chance of leverage attacks, but due to the unique shape of the Curve and its low profile, a Mini Evolution is not always long enough to reach around the bike rack or pole provided. I feel the New York lock is too heavy to carry around.

    2) I also use a cable lock to secure the wheels and the frame to the bike rack. The bike is small so you don't need a long one. The handle bars on the Curve can be stolen if a thief/vandal decides to cut the brake and shifter cables, so I usually fold the handle bars down and tie the cable lock around them.

    3) For the seat, I take it with me when I go to the office (Who wants to steal a seatless bike?). If I'm tooling around town and need to stop into a coffee shop or restaurant I'll use a Kryptoflex loop cable (the smallest and thinnest one they have) to loop around the seat rails and attach to the U-Lock. The Curve SL also has removable peddles.

    4) The U-Lock and cables can be easily carried around on the optional rear bicycle rack. It comes with a very secure shock cord. I can even attach a small pannier to the rear rack while my lunch box goes on top. I highly recommend getting the rear rack and fenders installed. I can ride through puddles and not get wet.

    5) Ditto for the recommendation on marking the seat and handle bar post with a permanent marker so that you can quickly set the seat height back to riding height.

    6) I keep the bike folded to save space at home. It seems pretty durable despite all the folding I put it through.

  18. #18
    Junior Member carmat3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Santa Monica, California
    My Bikes
    DownTube IV FS
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Santa Monica, California

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey thanks for the responses. I am leaning towards a cable lock cos they are lighter and easier to use and I like travelling light, but I may still consider a U-lock--they do look heavy though. Is there a lock that I can wrap around the seatpost so it's not in the way? If you were to recommend a cable lock that's light, yet full functional, which one is good?

    Again, I'd probably only lock the bike with a lock for a few minutes, while eating lunch at a cafe or something or to zoom inside a store. Maybe I'm dreaming, but the idea is that if I use a lock, the bike will be within my eyesight 90% of the time in case someone tries to steal it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •