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  1. #1
    fanatik Speedub.Nate's Avatar
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    Strida XT "for tall riders" w/ 18" wheels...

    As trueno92 posted in his Strida 2009 thread elsewhere in this forum, Strida will be showing a few new models at Interbike next week, including the Strida XT (Extra-Tall?) with 18" wheels.

    Attached is a picture of what is supposedly the XT, though I can't make heads or tails of the size difference. Can you? I'm not sure if I should expect a longer stem, or if that's unnecessary due to the presumably greater height of the bike. Also, the larger 18" wheels ought to throw off the perspective just enough to make any changes in frame size difficult to distinguish.

    Retail is listed by my Areaware email at $1000. No word whether the Schlumpf 2-speed crankset will be an option with this one, as it is on the newly announced Strida Duo model -- conventially sized, of course!

    A very interesting development. I'd love to see some folded side-by-side pics if anybody attending iBike can snap some off. Much thanks, in advance!

    STRiDA XT for Taller Riders
    The STRiDA XT was designed to accommodate taller riders with a larger frame and 18" wheels. Available in brushed aluminum. Retail $1000.

    Last edited by Speedub.Nate; 09-18-08 at 02:24 PM.

  2. #2
    lube addict
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    Strida Sport Duo is $1200.00! The MAS Special is $1400.00! Wow, the Schlumpf 2-speed drive really adds cost for one extra gear.

  3. #3
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    How much taller?

    I'm over 1.8m and I can handle the current models.

  4. #4
    fanatik Speedub.Nate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carlos71 View Post

    How much taller?
    Dunno. I, too, am 6' and find the standard model to be a bit too small / short.

    Unfortunately, the email was devoid of any size information. Anyone got anything on this?

  5. #5
    babylon by bike Standalone's Avatar
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    The site claims that it's sized for 5'10" to 6'10!

    Now I really want one-- it would be ideal for my commute. Small size and relatively high price were putting it out of contention, but now it's only price. That, and I've never tried one to see whether I like to ride it.

    http://www.areaware.com/proddetail.a...15&subCatID=79

    none in stock at the moment, but I did see a used one f/s in the Manhattan CL. Someone buy it before I do!
    The bicycle, the bicycle surely, should always be the vehicle of novelists and poets. Christopher Morley

  6. #6
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Standalone View Post
    The site claims that it's sized for 5'10" to 6'10!

    Now I really want one-- it would be ideal for my commute. Small size and relatively high price were putting it out of contention, but now it's only price. That, and I've never tried one to see whether I like to ride it.

    http://www.areaware.com/proddetail.a...15&subCatID=79

    none in stock at the moment, but I did see a used one f/s in the Manhattan CL. Someone buy it before I do!
    Shameless plug - I'm selling mine. Listed in the San Francisco CL. I'll ship if needed.
    http://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/bik/991032513.html

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Standalone View Post
    The site claims that it's sized for 5'10" to 6'10!

    Now I really want one-- it would be ideal for my commute. Small size and relatively high price were putting it out of contention, but now it's only price. That, and I've never tried one to see whether I like to ride it.

    http://www.areaware.com/proddetail.a...15&subCatID=79

    none in stock at the moment, but I did see a used one f/s in the Manhattan CL. Someone buy it before I do!
    I wonder what 18" tires will be available or if they are ERTO 355 like the Birdy..

  8. #8
    Bicycling Gnome
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    Unless the gearing on the pulleys has been altered (it may have been, I don't know) the bike will have a higher gearing with an 18 inch wheel.

    I find my 56 inch geared knock off pretty good starting off, climbing mild hills, and on the flat it's a breeze, but it runs out of steam really quickly on the slightest downhill, and my legs become a blur at about 13 - 14 mph.

    If mine had 18 inch wheels with the same cogs, I'd be straining badly on some of the routes I use, and probably having to dismount.

    If two gears could be arranged more cost effectively than the schlumph drive, it would be really good to have it set up for say 50 inches and 65 or maybe 70. The strida wouldn't be a bike I'd like to be doing 25 or 30 on for sure, but I'd feel less daft going downhill at 18mph rather than 12 or 13 with my legs spinning.

  9. #9
    babylon by bike Standalone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SesameCrunch View Post
    Shameless plug - I'm selling mine. Listed in the San Francisco CL. I'll ship if needed.
    http://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/bik/991032513.html
    You have the specs for the regular Strida 5 listed on the Ad, not the Strida 5 xt....
    The bicycle, the bicycle surely, should always be the vehicle of novelists and poets. Christopher Morley

  10. #10
    Senior Member edwong3's Avatar
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    I wonder if Strida's designer has ever considered using the time proven Sturmey Archer 3 speed internal hub? Could it be because of the rear fork design, the width of the wheel, etc?

    The AW hub on a normal 56" gearing would provide something like a 42" gear on 1rst, and almost 75" on 3rd. That is a fairly useful range.

    Regards,
    Edward



    Quote Originally Posted by EvilV View Post
    Unless the gearing on the pulleys has been altered (it may have been, I don't know) the bike will have a higher gearing with an 18 inch wheel.

    I find my 56 inch geared knock off pretty good starting off, climbing mild hills, and on the flat it's a breeze, but it runs out of steam really quickly on the slightest downhill, and my legs become a blur at about 13 - 14 mph.

    If mine had 18 inch wheels with the same cogs, I'd be straining badly on some of the routes I use, and probably having to dismount.

    If two gears could be arranged more cost effectively than the schlumph drive, it would be really good to have it set up for say 50 inches and 65 or maybe 70. The strida wouldn't be a bike I'd like to be doing 25 or 30 on for sure, but I'd feel less daft going downhill at 18mph rather than 12 or 13 with my legs spinning.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Amuro Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chainstrainer View Post
    Strida Sport Duo is $1200.00! The MAS Special is $1400.00! Wow, the Schlumpf 2-speed drive really adds cost for one extra gear.
    The sticker with Mark Sanders' signature on it, different colour, without rear rack and fenders cost another $200!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amuro_Ray

    Folding Forum - The Community Site for all Folding and Micro Bicycles
    http://www.foldingforum.com/forum

  12. #12
    Senior Member Amuro Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceMetras View Post
    I wonder what 18" tires will be available or if they are ERTO 355 like the Birdy..
    Information from Strida Europe website:
    http://www.strida.nl/en/english/products.php?subpage=xt
    For the 18" rims (Strida XT, or upgrade kit), we use the Schwalbe Kojak tire. This type of Schwalbe tire weighs only 230 grammes.
    Futhermore the tires can be inflated to 100PSI and the threadless tire surface reduces splashing water and increases mechanical grip, even during wet circumstances!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amuro_Ray

    Folding Forum - The Community Site for all Folding and Micro Bicycles
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  13. #13
    Bicycling Gnome
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwong3 View Post
    I wonder if Strida's designer has ever considered using the time proven Sturmey Archer 3 speed internal hub? Could it be because of the rear fork design, the width of the wheel, etc?

    The AW hub on a normal 56" gearing would provide something like a 42" gear on 1rst, and almost 75" on 3rd. That is a fairly useful range.

    Regards,
    Edward
    The stub axle design of the way the wheels are mounted would mean that the hub axle could only be held on one side. I've just looked at my Knock offs - strida and Brompton types and you might be able to do it, but the SA hub is much wider than the strida wheel. Also the width of the rear belt pulley is much more than the sprocket.

    The main issue would probably be that the SA hub has a hollow axle and bearings have dimensions and designs that are specified with the expectation that it will be supported on both sides, quite unlike the strida design.

    Some good engineer might be able to lash up something that would allow it to work, but I doubt the axle would stand it for long taking all the load on one side. I think you'd need a new version of the hub engineered to be supported only at one side of the axle.

    I think it is no accident that the geared stridas work with a two speed crank. What we need is some Chinese company to make a knock off schlumpf drive for 50 - then I'll buy one and get me some gears . The price of 375 is pretty steep for a thing like that. Its the cost of being virtually hand made in Switzerland by a small engineering company, I think. In contrast, I recently bought a brand new back wheel for the merc with an SRF3 SA hub for 35. The schlumpf is necessarily less complex since it just locks in or out the epicyclic gears.

    The first link shows the schlumpf in action and the second is to the schlumpf site.

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=OZoXbfccW6U

    http://www.schlumpf.ch/antriebe_engl.htm


    The internals look really interesting - images from schlumpf site:











    The PDF manual is very interesting too:

    http://www.schlumpf.ch/handbuecher/WHB.sd.engl.pdf
    Last edited by EvilV; 01-15-09 at 11:28 AM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Amuro Lee's Avatar
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    Interesting e-mail reply from Strida UK 2 years ago when Strida Netherlands had not taken over the sales of Strida in the UK:
    Quote Originally Posted by Strida UK
    dear amuro

    thank you for your email enquiry and interest in Strida.

    strida was designed to be a zero-maintenance, ultra-light, "a to b" bike. for flat terrain, you can ride the bike indefinitely - on steep hills the range is limited, though one owner rode the strida the length of new zealand.

    because the bike is so light, it doesn't take much energy to pedal and the gear inches have been optimized through both application of theory and extensive test riding. interestingly, we learned after finalizing gear ratio that the one spec'd was the same one on all the british postal service single-speed mail-delivery bikes. - 56 gear inches.

    in short the terrain found in such cities as new york, and london is suited for the strida.

    we recommend taking a look at the evaluation provided by journalist tim pestridge, who experimented with replacing his 24 speed bike with a strida for his daily 11 mile daily commute. see http://www.pestridge.com/strida3.html

    when evaluating whether you'll need gears or not ask yourself what sparked your question and where would you anticipate using bike?
    for most city commuters gears are far from essential.


    p.s. following is more chatty response offered by mark sanders, inventor of the strida, to a customer inquiry in 2005 on the subject:

    "Yes I have made several prototypes of geared versions, 2 speed & 3 speed, these were also retro-fittable ... but no plans for production .... most people prefer the simpler, lighter, fuss-free single-speed strida....... which has a lowish 56" gear. I found the only real benefit to the geared versions was faster decents, hill climbing was only marginally better, with a lower gear."

    "Try a Strida as it is - single speed suits its uncluttered, clean and minimalist design philosophy.... Strida IS fast in its natural urban habitat ! For example in London its as fast as all but the lycra boys, its also about overall journey time and ease of use ..... which includes near instant folding (5-7sec), and convenience when folded (just wheel along - no carrying and no bruised shins).
    Strida.co.uk has a 60-day money back trial - so If you find you can't live with it, chop it in for a conventional folder of which there are plenty to choose from - all very similar, 'F' frames."

    we thank you for all your comments and confirm that they have been forwarded over to management. we do appreciate feedback.

    if you need any further information regarding this matter, please do not hesitate to contact us.

    kind regards

    debbie - strida customer services
    Here are photos of a prototype geared Strida on Mark Sanders' web album:
    http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/MAS.DP...35275302027810
    http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/MAS.DP...76508813672882
    Last edited by Amuro Lee; 01-15-09 at 03:01 PM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amuro_Ray

    Folding Forum - The Community Site for all Folding and Micro Bicycles
    http://www.foldingforum.com/forum

  15. #15
    Bicycling Gnome
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    I sympathise with the points raised in Amuro Lee's post. The design is perfectly suitable for a short commute, though maybe not in a very hilly location. My home is on top of a 240 foot hill, and I have to cross a valley in order to get most places I want to get to. I can still ride the 56 gear bike around most of my routes, though there are a couple of routes that I can ride on the Merc that I avoid on the Strida K off. If I go the very steep way, I just get off and walk up on the way back. It isn't that far and only takes six or seven minutes of walking to get back.

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