Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-21-08, 03:13 PM   #1
MarMek
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 18
Should I really bother?

Hey, I've got this snazzy Boardwalk S1 I just got not too long ago, but I've recently careened into a rose bush. The bike's fine, and I'm okay.. but I've now got a flat tire. I'm wondering whether or not I should just replace the tire on my own, or go to a bike shop. My theory is that I can replace it on my own with a four buck tire, or bring it in to a store and spend fifteen. It really can't be that hard, right? I'm a newcomer to all of this, and have been using the bike to get to local markets and whatnot, so I have never changed a tire on a bike before. Any thoughts on this? or can anyone please tell me how to do this?

If it helps any, its the front tire that's flat; and that as far as I know, I just need to unscrew the tire from the bike, get the old tire off and slightly inflated new tire on, get the whole thing screwed back in, and then inflate to required amount. But I pretty much don't know the details in between those steps.
MarMek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-08, 03:29 PM   #2
vik 
cyclopath
 
vik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Victoria, BC
Bikes: Surly Krampus, Surly Straggler, Pivot Mach 6, Bike Friday Tikit, Bike Friday Tandem, Santa Cruz Nomad
Posts: 5,265
I'd take the time to learn how to fix a flat. If you have a patch kit or care to buy one you can simply fix the tube and not have to replace anything at all. Plus it will be a useful skill to know when a bike shop is not close at hand and you need to get rolling again.

If you are unsure how to fix the flat just do a Google search there are loads of easy to follow instructions online.
__________________
safe riding - Vik
VikApproved
vik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-08, 05:30 PM   #3
Scott.Whitaker
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Orlando, FL
Bikes: Bacchetta Giro 20
Posts: 7
This guy has a how-to video. Check out his other videos, too.

http://bicycletutor.com/fix-flat-tire/
Scott.Whitaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-08, 06:10 PM   #4
MarMek
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 18
The issue I'm having is that I can't seem to figure out how to remove my front wheel in the first place. I can understand everything else about getting the tube replaced, but I just can't get the wheel off. As far as I know, I'm just supposed to unscrew the nut that's holding it there using a wrench. But that doesn't seem to work. I keep seeing things about quick release wheels, but I can't find anything on getting a non-quick release wheel off.
MarMek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-08, 07:34 PM   #5
Lalato
Senior Member
 
Lalato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bay Area and Sacramento
Bikes: Bike Friday Tikit
Posts: 1,159
Unscrew both sides. Then the wheel should just pull right off. Give it a good tug, if it feels tight even after you've loosened things up.

--sam
Lalato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-08, 07:39 PM   #6
vik 
cyclopath
 
vik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Victoria, BC
Bikes: Surly Krampus, Surly Straggler, Pivot Mach 6, Bike Friday Tikit, Bike Friday Tandem, Santa Cruz Nomad
Posts: 5,265
Worst case pay a LBS to show you how the first time.
__________________
safe riding - Vik
VikApproved
vik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-08, 07:51 PM   #7
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 6,789
And don't forget to unhook the brake noodle. Just this weekend I saw a girl struggling to get a front wheel off a bike she just bought; went over to help and found the brake noodle still connected. I think there would be images at sheldonbrown and park tools but don't have the time to look now.
jur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-08, 08:18 PM   #8
veggie_lover
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 239
You need a #15 wrench to take the two nuts off that holds the tire. It can take quite a bit of force to get them loose, particularly if you have a short wrench. I use a hammer to hit the wrench head to get it loose.
veggie_lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-08, 12:25 AM   #9
MarMek
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 18
Thanks everyone! I figured out what I was doing wrong. Those two nuts that hold the tire on were stuck there insanely tight. I was afraid that needing to use a lot of extra force would break something, but after decided to bite the bullet, a lot of extra force was what it needed. Had to put a pipe onto the end of the wrench for more leverage.
MarMek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-08, 06:11 AM   #10
Sammyboy
The Legitimiser
 
Sammyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Southampton, UK
Bikes: Gazelle Trim Trophy, EG Bates Track Bike, HR Bates Cantiflex bike, Nigel Dean fixed gear conversion, Raleigh Royal, Falcon Westminster.
Posts: 4,847
They're holding the wheel on. To be clear, a wheel is made up of rim (the metal ring round the outside) spokes (which connect the rim to the hub), and the the hub (the bit in the middle). The tire is just the rubber casing on the outside. Inside that, you'll find an "inner tube", which is what actually contains the air. When you get a flat tire, unless there's significant damage to the external casing of the tire, all you usually need to do is repair or replace the tube. I'm giving you these terms not to be a pain in the arse, but because using the correct terminology will help you get assistance quicker.
Sammyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-08, 06:17 AM   #11
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...
Posts: 15,542
Just to thoroughly complicate matters, you don't actually need to take the wheel off the bike to fix a hole in the tube.
rhm is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:10 PM.