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Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

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Old 10-11-08, 07:49 AM   #1
markhr
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Birdy now has disc brakes as standard!!!!

AFTT!

Looking through the R&M configurator the Birdy Rohloff and Birdy Speed versions (both versions only available in polished aluminium) come with disc brakes as standard.

Apparently all my calls about disc brakes to the marketing geeks in Germany finally got through their skulls Sure makes a change from being laughed at the first time I called

In reality it's probably a combination of the Birdy BD-1 Ti having disc brakes (therefore a welding jig already made) and Chop's much publicized customized Birdy rather than anything I did

http://www.r-m.de/produkte/produktfi...ohloff/orange/

edit: If this isn't news then apologies for crowing
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Last edited by markhr; 10-11-08 at 08:08 AM. Reason: slow on uptake
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Old 10-11-08, 09:11 AM   #2
somnatash
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Its sure good to know they have it in the configurator now. Not brand new the news, I posted pix from Eurobike:
Eurobike, new Dahons and other folders

The Disc-Version will only come in polished alu (at least for now) and it will be an "either or" choice. The frame will have no cantilever adapters. The disc bikes only come with Rohloff hub or "Speed"-version (with tune crank)

Last edited by somnatash; 10-11-08 at 09:14 AM.
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Old 10-11-08, 09:33 AM   #3
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Nice - thanks for the link - I hadn't read that thread.
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Old 10-11-08, 10:28 AM   #4
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What is disc brake? And why is it better than your standard padded brake?
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Old 10-11-08, 11:40 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by markhr View Post
AFTT!

Looking through the R&M configurator the Birdy Rohloff and Birdy Speed versions (both versions only available in polished aluminium) come with disc brakes as standard.

Apparently all my calls about disc brakes to the marketing geeks in Germany finally got through their skulls Sure makes a change from being laughed at the first time I called

In reality it's probably a combination of the Birdy BD-1 Ti having disc brakes (therefore a welding jig already made) and Chop's much publicized customized Birdy rather than anything I did

http://www.r-m.de/produkte/produktfi...ohloff/orange/

edit: If this isn't news then apologies for crowing
I am still trying to find a reputable Birdy dealer in Canada/ US but it seems to be a challenge.
The last thing I want is to have an expensive bike and no support.
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Old 10-11-08, 12:22 PM   #6
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vincentnyc

I recommend you buy yourself a basic bicycle maintenance book so you can fill in the gaps in your knowledge. In the UK we have Haynes Bike Book.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bike-Book-Fr...3749238&sr=8-1
Try and buy something like that in the US and I think it will help you alot

Here is some help for beginners http://sheldonbrown.com/beginners/index.html Reading through this will help also

Last edited by joose; 10-11-08 at 03:30 PM. Reason: added info
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Old 10-11-08, 03:10 PM   #7
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Disc configuration eliminates anti-dive geometry

With the caliper located on the bottom arm, the line of action of the braking force passes near the suspension pivot and virtually eliminates the anti-dive characteristic designed into the Birdy suspension with their standard brake arrangement.

I wonder how much difference that will make for steep downhill braking?

David
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Old 10-11-08, 04:01 PM   #8
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With the caliper located on the bottom arm, the line of action of the braking force passes near the suspension pivot and virtually eliminates the anti-dive characteristic designed into the Birdy suspension with their standard brake arrangement.

I wonder how much difference that will make for steep downhill braking?

David
I thought a lot about how the anti-dive works and have finally settled on the explanation that as brakes are applied, a torque is exerted by the wheel on the leading link. You can imagine someone else applying the brake, then you grabbing the front wheel by the tyre and trying to rotate it forwards. The bike will tend to lift at the back and stretch the front suspension open. Using this thought experiment, I don't see a difference at all where the actual braking takes place, as long as the brake mounts are somewhere on the leading link.
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Old 10-13-08, 05:12 AM   #9
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I still cannot understand why so many people are after disc brake. They add up lots of weight (Hubs, spokes, calipers, rotors) and scratching sound from bent rotors is sooooo anoying. If you properly set up V-brakes you can easily lock both wheels anyway. They are good for muddy offroad riding of course, but I don't think birdy is designed for that situation.
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Old 10-13-08, 06:46 AM   #10
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I was disappointed that Strida went to disc brakes as they just don't need them. However, from what I read, drum brakes are now more expensive to source.

Disc brakes seem to be where the 'fashion' is going whether their suitable or not?

There is a argument that the stopping power of disc brakes is too much for tire traction to cope with (and this is on full sized bikes) so should folding bikes gain more weight when a lighter way of stopping (v-brakes, drum brakes) are available?

On a loose link, reminds me of the camera battles of ever larger megapixels when you really need the sensor to match or you get no use from those extra megapixels.

Last edited by joose; 10-13-08 at 07:37 AM.
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Old 10-13-08, 02:11 PM   #11
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Disc brakes have the decided advantage that the rims don't wear out. For those riding on wet roads this is a very big advantage as rear rims will wear out in only several 1000km. The reason I stopped using back brakes except as backup.
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Old 10-13-08, 02:22 PM   #12
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Disc brakes have the decided advantage that the rims don't wear out. For those riding on wet roads this is a very big advantage as rear rims will wear out in only several 1000km. The reason I stopped using back brakes except as backup.

How does the advantages of that compare to the drum brakes on the older Strida? I was under the impression that they are also good in the rain.
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